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223 crimping

Neruda1Neruda1 Member Posts: 8 ✭✭
Is it necessary to crimp 223 ammo ?

Comments

  • MG1890MG1890 Member Posts: 4,649
    edited November -1
    I never do.....
  • dcs shootersdcs shooters Member Posts: 10,969
    edited November -1
    I crimp for my AR,S [;)]
  • HawkshawHawkshaw Member Posts: 1,016 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    If you ask the experts at Nosler, they will tell you to NEVER crimp a cartridge, UNLESS THE BULLET has a cannelure for that purpose. Where do you think the brass is going to go if you crimp a std. bullet???
  • MobuckMobuck Member Posts: 11,558 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I use cannelured bullets and crimp ALL my AR handloads. Whether one does or doesn't seems to be a matter of preference right up to the time when a bullet gets pushed back into the case and blows the rifle up.
  • AmbroseAmbrose Member Posts: 2,719 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The forces involved with an AR type rifle tend to move the bullet out of the case similar to an inertia bullet puller. You don't want that, either, so crimping is a good idea. My .223's are bolt actions so I don't need to crimp.
  • chiefrchiefr Member Posts: 11,090 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    This topic has been debated on other forums hundreds of times.
    If you are shooting a bolt action or single shot, there is no need to crimp.

    The debate tends to get interesting when dealing with autos. I always crimp when loading for any auto. The inertia of the bolt slamming a cartridge can push the bullet back in the case or if the tip of the bullet hits something while being fed. I have seen this happen enough times with a variety of autos to recommend crimping.

    You will find people that disagree and say they never crimp for automatics. My answer has always been "Maybe so, but all military ammo is crimped"
  • armilitearmilite Member Posts: 35,195 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I always crimp with cannelured bullets everything else gets a light crimp. I believe Lee Precision makes a die just for this purpose.
  • 1KYDSTR1KYDSTR Member Posts: 2,357 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Yes, Lee makes the "Factory Crimp" dies that crimp into a cannelured grove, or MAKE a crimp groove in a non cannelured bullet. Crimp is normally the enemy of gilt edge accuracy, but in auto loaders, it is de rigeure as mentioned. One work around for increasing neck tension is to remove the dies expander ball/rod, chuck it in a drill and using fine Emory cloth, take the diameter down a few 10 thousandths at a time until you get better purchase on the bullet. Still, in an auto loader,I crimp.
  • spiritsspirits Member Posts: 363 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I use my AR 5.56X45mm 1 in 7 twist barreled carbine for deer and hog hunting using long 70 gr SPs. The OCL of my reloads matches the max length for the magazine less 0.01 inches. I don't want the bullet moving at long. So I use a Lee collet factory crimper 1 full turn of the crimper die is all it takes; and the reloads are accurate and function reliably in my AR. I only wish Lee made a carbide roll crimper for semi-auto cartridges like they do for pistol cartridges.
  • reload999reload999 Member Posts: 3,164 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have only AR types in that caliber, so I use a Lee Factory Crimp die. Thus far I've used only 55 gr bullets with a cannelure.
  • mark christianmark christian Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 23,016 ******
    edited November -1
    We hit ten posts in ATE, so I'll move it over here and let the reloading forum boys have it.
  • mondmond Member Posts: 6,458
    edited November -1
    If you set your dies correctly, there no need ;)Unless you have a cannelured grove on the bullet, then its an option.. It also shortens the life of the cases !!
  • goldeneagle76goldeneagle76 Member Posts: 4,359
    edited November -1
    Lee FCD here as well for all AR loads, cannelure or not.
  • Neruda1Neruda1 Member Posts: 8 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thank you all for the information I have bought a Lee cripper And it works great !!!!
  • Neruda1Neruda1 Member Posts: 8 ✭✭
    edited November -1
  • 6mmBCC6mmBCC Member Posts: 5 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I will only crimp in the cannelure and use a Lee Factory crimp. For a bullet that does not have a cannelure when I size the brass I use a smaller expander spindle, all things dependent on variables of the neck thickness, the die and the hardness of the brass. That usually gives me a tight enough fit in an AR to the bullet in place. I polish my expander spindle's to a .221 and .222. I keep one at .220 for thick neck brass or wanting a good tight fit as long as it irons out the case mouth. All things once again, dependent on how small the necks get by the die you are using, the softness and thickness of brass the itself. That is the way I do it.
  • MobuckMobuck Member Posts: 11,558 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    "One work around for increasing neck tension is to remove the dies expander ball/rod, chuck it in a drill and using fine Emory cloth, take the diameter down a few 10 thousandths at a time until you get better purchase on the bullet."
    On my "redneck progressive" turret press, the powder check uses a neck sizer die w/o expander. This works well with boattail bullets(which is what I load on this press exclusively.
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