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H380 powder

strokn47265strokn47265 Member Posts: 749 ✭✭✭✭
Well does anyone use this powder? I took a chance and got an 8 pound jug and a 1 pound jug for 60 bucks. I have found some reloading recipes, but would like to have more.. It will be for a AR15, with 24 inch barrel, 223. Would like to load 55 gr spie points or boat tails. Help help appreciated.

Comments

  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,348 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Great price. Hornady Handbook Rifle Pistol vol. II. 55gr Spire Pt. Starting 26.9 gr @ 2700 fps Max 28.5 gr @ 2900 Rem cases Rem 6.5 primer in a Colt AR-15 Sporter 20" bbl
  • dcs shootersdcs shooters Member Posts: 10,969
    edited November -1
    I came up with 25.5-27.5 for that bullet.
  • SoreShoulderSoreShoulder Member Posts: 3,054 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    there's always the load data on hodgdon.com
  • NeoBlackdogNeoBlackdog Member Posts: 14,464 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by SoreShoulder
    there's always the load data on hodgdon.com


    I looked there, as I'd never heard of H380, and they don't have it listed. Is this a pretty new powder?
  • SoreShoulderSoreShoulder Member Posts: 3,054 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    No, it's in a certain manual I have from 1974.

    Since I made you look for no reason, I dug it up (Speer No.9) and for 55gr 223, Remington cases, and their 55gr spitzer bullet, they suggest 27.0 gr and a CCI 450 give 2739 fps, 28gr gives 2863, and the max charge of 29gr gives 2952 fps.

    They advise only going up to the middle load for semiautos.

    It's a little slow for 223. It was named by Bruce Hodgdon for giving accurate results with 38.0 grain charges behind a 52gr bullet in the 22-250, a much larger round, and the manual lists 39gr as a max charge.

    OTOH it is one of the few non-flattened spherical powders and will meter even better than most of those.
  • FrancFFrancF Member Posts: 35,278 ******
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by strokn47265
    Well does anyone use this powder?

    Yes! when I can get my hands on it. Bruce Hodgdon first used it. When a 38.0 grain charge behind a 52 grain bullet gave one hole groups from his 22 caliber wildcat (now called the 22-250), he appropriately named the powder H380. H380 is also a superb performer in the 220 Swift, 243, 257 Roberts and other fine varmint cartridges.

    I am thinking it might be a little slow for .223. but if you have a .22-250 or other mid sized cal.'s it's a great powder. Just not a lot of data for .223.
  • RobOzRobOz Member Posts: 9,539 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by NeoBlackdog
    quote:Originally posted by SoreShoulder
    there's always the load data on hodgdon.com


    I looked there, as I'd never heard of H380, and they don't have it listed. Is this a pretty new powder?


    Been around for years. It used to be the "only" powder for the 22-250.
  • XXCrossXXCross Member Posts: 1,374 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    H380 is an excellent mid-range powder. I've burned a tonne of it in
    7mm Mauser and 30-06. I'd agree that it probably isn't the best choice for a small capacity case like the 223.
  • strokn47265strokn47265 Member Posts: 749 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks for the input....[:)][:)]
  • 243winxb243winxb Member Posts: 264 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Use a magnum primer. The Rem 6 1/2 should not be used in 223 rem. H380 would not be my choice for the 223 rem, but the price is right.
    [url] https://saami.org [/url]
  • Ray BRay B Member Posts: 11,822
    edited November -1
    If your
    AR has a fast enough twist to stabilize a heavier bullet (60+ grs) the H380 would work well.
  • AmbroseAmbrose Member Posts: 2,952 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    FWIW: I checked out at the library an old book by Warren Page. If you recall, he was in on the ground floor of benchrest shooters organizations. He was instrumental in getting Remington to produce the 7 1/2 primer. He stated that the primer is the same as the 6 1/2 except it has a thicker primer cup to better handle the higher pressures. Of course, that was long ago and it may (probably) have been changed since then. But it is still called a benchrest primer as opposed to magnum.
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