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Reloading equipt.

Gene248Gene248 Member Posts: 356 ✭✭✭
What is your personal thoughts on the Hornady Lock N Load classic kit? I will not be reloading great amounts of ammo per month. Are the Hornady dies a good quality? I used to use strictly RCBS but sold all that years ago. Now I wish I had it all back. Also, is any one having luck with finding powder?

Comments

  • RobOzRobOz Member Posts: 9,539 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    They make a good product.
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,348 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I'm still using my Lyman Orange Crusher. I think I have had about 20 presses of all kinds. Lock and loads look interesting but I'd bet it cost more. I think their dies are ok, RCBS isn't my first choice.

    A while back the local Sportsman Warehouse had powder on the shelf. Cabela's had primers didn't see any powder. Local gun shop says they have everything in stock at new lower prices what ever that means.
  • XXCrossXXCross Member Posts: 1,374 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hornady does make a good product. However, unless you are loading for more than a few (3?) cartridges, I'm not sure the extra price is worth it. (some guys do load a lot of different shells)
  • Ray BRay B Member Posts: 11,822
    edited November -1
    I have a Pacific press, made after they were purchased by Hornady. It is good quality. I have no experience with the Lock-n-Load system. My preference in dies is LE Wilson, Redding then others.
  • Gene248Gene248 Member Posts: 356 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by XXCross

    Hornady does make a good product. However, unless you are loading for more than a few (3?) cartridges, I'm not sure the extra price is worth it. (some guys do load a lot of different shells)


    I plan on just starting out with 3 calibers (25/06,223, and 243) Right now those are the ones I need. Later, I will be reloading 9mm,45acp,40SW,30/30 and others.
  • JimmyJackJimmyJack Member Posts: 4,739 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I switched to the Hornady and I love it. It is personal preferance, but I do think it allows better repetition from batch to batch. The cost isnt too much more if you buy in quantity and shop ebay. I started with a dozen
  • gunnut505gunnut505 Member Posts: 10,290
    edited November -1
    Hornady makes good lead wadcutters.
  • Gene248Gene248 Member Posts: 356 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I bought the Lock N Load kit. Now I am getting the dies, powder, etc that I need to get started. I am having problems with getting powder and primers but managed to find a little of each.
    Thanks for your thoughts on the Hornady equipt.
  • TfloggerTflogger Member Posts: 3,056 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hornady makes the best dies.
  • RobOzRobOz Member Posts: 9,539 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Tflogger
    Hornady makes the best dies.


    That's debatable
  • gunnut505gunnut505 Member Posts: 10,290
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Tflogger
    Hornady makes the bestless expensive, but not quite Redding quality dies.


    Fixed it for ya.[;)]
  • nononsensenononsense Member Posts: 10,935 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Gene28,

    quote:What is your personal thoughts on the Hornady Lock N Load classic kit?

    Like most of the 'kits' offered by the various manufacturers, the Lock-N-Load Classic is fine for general purpose reloading for the vast majority of reloaders. It's simple to just buy the kit and start reloading when you add the components and dies. There are two basic drawbacks to buying 'kits':

    - Cost. The manufacturers put everything into a kit you can possibly need to get started. As a result you pay an inflated price for the kit as opposed to shopping for the best price for the individual pieces you need or want. This process takes more time and effort which is the biggest selling point for the kits, it saves time and effort.

    - Choice. You have no choices as to the pieces included, so if you don't like a particular scale or trickler, too bad. You buy the pieces you don't want and then let them sit (costing you more money) or you have to try to sell them while you buy the type you really want.

    There are few if any real differences between the majority of the average dies on the market today. Most of these discussions revolve around highly personalized opinions and not any scientific or manufacturing differences. Most of the dies on the market today will produce acceptable ammunition for the average hunter and plinker. Occasionally we all get a bad die that slipped through QC (if there is anything like this anymore...). But for the great majority, the generic, run-of-the-mill dies work just fine. The makers name is of little consequence.

    Everything else is just marketing and opinion. Given valid testing procedures, one brand does not supersede another when it comes to producing acceptable hunting quality ammunition. One particular maker is really no better but it is significantly more expensive than the others. This is the same marketing concept used by Nosler years ago to boost their profits and market standing. Over-price the product, sell it in smaller quantities making it appear more precious and then sell it as being much better because it costs more. Then let the consumers argue it out on the internet.

    The nice feature of the Hornady Lock-N-Load is the bushing concept for the dies. This can save a bunch of time and aggravation once you have the dies set for producing the ammunition you want. Leaving the bushings on and remove the units from the press gets you the same set up the next time without the hassle of screwing the dies in and out for adjustment.

    quote:Also, is any one having luck with finding powder?

    Powder is coming back into the market albeit slowly. If you're shopping locally in person, the only suggestion is to start calling every store within your limit of driving distance. Failing this, I'm seeing a huge rise in the amount of trading taking place between reloaders, powders as well as bullets. Forums and bulletin boards are great for notices and responses. Shooting clubs often host swap meets where you might find a connection.
    Other than this, you are left with the internet and paying Hazmat plus shipping to get the powder you want if it's available.

    Local Cabela's and other retailers have been showing some stock although higher prices are in effect. Maybe suggest to a few reloaders to go together to secure a bigger buy and make a longer trip to a supplier with the powder in stock. Use your ingenuity to solve the logistics of a larger buy.

    Enjoy your renewed interest in reloading!

    Best.
  • Gene248Gene248 Member Posts: 356 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Question about primers. I can get a bunch of the CCI BR4 primers.
    Will they work on the 223 round.( I was told they would work) What is the difference between the BR primers and the regular CCI primers?
    Thanks
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,348 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I think the are select a run for more uniformity than normal. They cost more. I tried them in a varmint special 700 223, didn't seem to make it shoot better.
  • RobOzRobOz Member Posts: 9,539 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Gene248
    Question about primers. I can get a bunch of the CCI BR4 primers.
    Will they work on the 223 round.( I was told they would work) What is the difference between the BR primers and the regular CCI primers?
    Thanks


    They say they have their most experienced workers running the BR batches. I used them when they were just a couple more bucks a brick for a couple of my varmint rifles, but now the price difference is substantial. When I have used up the last of them I will switch over to my regular 200 and 400. I always used Federal 215's in one of my 308's and recently had to buy the 215 match because that was all they had. I think I paid 50 bucks a brick.

    In the 223 I use more 41's and 450's than anything else.
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