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Mauser military or commercial action?

v35v35 Member Posts: 13,200
edited August 2003 in Ask the Experts
Saw a beautiful Mauser sporter in 257 Roberts with slender, full length Mannlicher type stock. The owner says the action is a commercial model but the receiver bridge was covered by a scope mount.
There was some stippling type engraving on the bridge that extended below the mount. It had the Mauser name and address on the left side of the receiver.
It was my understanding that commercial actions didn't have the stripper clip thumb groove that's on this one.

Comments

  • p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    The commercial STANDARD MODELL had them so I would guess that information about not having them is incorrect.

    He That Pays The Piper Calls The Tune.
  • mark christianmark christian Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 22,789 ******
    edited November -1
    One of the very first Mauser commercial sporter catalogs (from around 1898) clearly depicts a large ring Mauser with the clip grooved receiver and a five shot stripper clip next to the rifle. Nearly all sporters had this feature...whether useable or not. Calibers available at that time were 10.75mm, 9.3mm, 9X57 mm, 8mm, 7mm, and 6.5mm.

    Mark T. Christian
  • v35v35 Member Posts: 13,200
    edited November -1
    I assumed the bridge engraving was done to obliterate military markings. Are there any identifying features that would differentiate
    the sporter action from a sporterized military action ?
  • p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    Commercial proofing instead of military proofing is about the only way. Exactly what is it you are trying to figure out. If you just want to launch projectiles and the rifle is pretty to you, buy it. Doesn't really matter what the parentage is does it?

    He That Pays The Piper Calls The Tune.
  • Der GebirgsjagerDer Gebirgsjager Member Posts: 1,685 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    v35--I'm looking at Chapter 7 of Ludwig Olson's book "Mauser Bolt Rifles", "Original Mauser Sporters And Cartridges", and almost all of the photos (but not all) definately show a charger bridge. Most of the photos are right side views and the thumb cutout isn't visible, but there is one which is canted more toward the right where it is visible, and one top view where it is visible. Doesn't make sense that they would provided the bridge for clip charging and not the thumb cutout. I've examined several originals and I believe that the stippling was just for decoration and perhaps to reduce glare. If the Mauser factory "banner" is on the rifle that would convince me that it was genuine factory production. Many of the Mannlicher-style sporters had double set triggers and a butterknife bolt handle, but others had a single trigger and knob handle.
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