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Driving Cell Phones

niklasalniklasal Member Posts: 776 ✭✭✭✭
edited January 2002 in General Discussion
Just yesterday I was riding my motorcycle and almost got run over by people talking on their cell phones and not paying attention. Nevermind the countless times I was side swiped, cut off, and swerved through intersections because they ran the light or stop sign.Is it just me, or do any of you out there also beleive that we need to draw the line with this issue?
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Comments

  • concealedG36concealedG36 Member Posts: 3,824
    edited November -1
    I have to agree with you, many people are simply incapible of driving while talking. While I hate to support yet another law (I think we have far too many already), something has to be done. Maybe stricter penalties for people found to be carelessly driving while using a cell phone? Stay safe,G36
    Gun Control Disarms Victims, NOT Criminals
  • mudgemudge Member Posts: 4,551
    edited November -1
    Nik....to answer your question...yes, talking on the phone while driving should be against the law. I don't care what you folks that do it say, research has been proven it to be a distraction.We also need to get something straight about your "motorcycle". Definition of "motorcycle"....anything NOT made by Harley-Davidson.Definition of "Bike"....anything made by Harley-Davidson except the Buell and the V-Rod.DO NOT listen to ANYTHING 7MM has to say abouthe subject. He's got a "go fast" affliction that may prove to be terminal Mudge the biker scum
    I can't come to work today. The voices said, STAY HOME AND CLEAN THE GUNS![This message has been edited by mudge (edited 01-30-2002).][This message has been edited by mudge (edited 01-30-2002).]
  • niklasalniklasal Member Posts: 776 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    You were right mudge - It's an '81 Honda with a bulletproof engine I bought a couple years ago for $300. That's what happens when you spend all your money on guns! Actually I don't think there are any laws regarding cell phones. My aunt got into an accident with someone on their cell phone and the cop gave the guy no ticket. As a matter of fact I have several friends who are LEOs and they do it al the time.
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  • GrandWizardGrandWizard Member Posts: 109 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    There are already laws in place, it's called inatentive driving. LEO's don't enforce them..and they won't enforce any new laws that are passed regarding cell phones. These feel good laws are too far down on the priority list.Folks who ride bikes are already at risk because many motorists ignore them, or don't see them because they already have their heads up and locked...I'm afraid another law isn't going to help you...be careful out there.
  • offerorofferor Member Posts: 9,168
    edited November -1
    Nah, I'm not too impressed with the logic of this. In fact, a study was just completed indicating that using a speakerphone in the car rather than a handheld job made NO improvement in avoiding road emergencies. That means that if two people in a car are holding a similar conversation, they are just as much at risk, maybe moreso, because if you watch the dork ahead of you crawling in the left lane you will often find that his/her head is turned sideways talking to the passenger. If talking is distracting to driving, I'm not sure it matters how it's being done. I know I've used my phone in the car with common sense and great success. I've put the cops on one or two wildly drunk drivers, for example. I tend to use mine for urgent business, to notify when I'm running late or something. I don't just get on the phone and yack, for either business or pleasure. I think the biggest offenders are drivers who love to blab at passengers, and workaholics who call their secretaries every time they get in the car. And that's all I have to say about that.
    "The 2nd Amendment is about defense, not hunting. Long live the gun shows, and reasonable access to FFLs. Join the NRA -- I'm a Life Member."
  • niklasalniklasal Member Posts: 776 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I really don't mind the "hands free" models. You are right, they are just like talking to a passenger.I do admit, for emergencies it is prudent to use one, no matter what kind. However, it is difficult to sympathize with the "hands-on" talkers when you're driving in gravel, forced off the road by someone gabbing, with their view obstructed by a right hand holding a phone. It's not just when I ride a motorcycle. That incident happened a month ago while I was in a car (thank God).
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  • nunnnunn Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 35,764 ******
    edited November -1
    One day while I was on patrol, this subject came up on a radio talk show. The discussion was about whether there should be a law prohibiting the use of a cellular phone while driving. The host was opposed to such a law, and his guest was in favor.I could not resist. I called the station, got on the air with the host and said,"I am a police officer on patrol. I am calling your show on my cell phone. I am also driving my patrol car, watching for violators, monitoring radio traffic, drinking a cup of coffee, and smoking a cigarette."The host was pleased.Some people cannot walk and chew gum at the same time. Should there be a law to restrict the rest of us because of them?I bet you bikers, if you have been at it long enough, had plenty of close calls before the advent of cell phones. It comes with the territory. The only way I kept from getting killed a number of times while riding a scooter was to pretend I was invisible and always figure the other guy was about to do something stupid.
    Certified SIG pistol armorer/FFL Dealer/Full time Peace Officer, Moderator of the General Discussion Board on Gunbroker. Visit www.gunbroker.com, the premier gun auction site on the Net! Email [email protected] Jesus is Lord!
  • old single shotsold single shots Member Posts: 3,594
    edited November -1
    I find it hard to believe that anyone needs to make a call so bad that they can't first pull off to the side of the road and stop the vehicle.How did these people survive before cell phones? I say--BAN their use in a moving vehicle.
  • LowriderLowrider Member Posts: 6,587
    edited November -1
    We don't need anymore laws in this country. There are * behind the wheel who can't drive worth a damn even when giving it 100% of their concentration. If phones are outlawed then I guess we need laws against tuning the radio, fiddling with the tape/CD player, talking to passengers, picking noses, etc.If they are screwing-up behind the wheel, for any reason, pull 'em over and write the ticket.Test EVERYBODY every year.Get incompetent drivers off the road.
    Lord Lowrider the LoquaciousMember:Secret Select Society of Suave Stylish Smoking Jackets She was only a fisherman's daughter,But when she saw my rod she reeled.
  • wundudneewundudnee Member Posts: 6,060 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Lowrider,Right on!Dumb is dumb, no matter how it is exibited.
    "If stupidity got us into this mess, then why can't it get us out?" Will Rogers
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  • smokinggunsmokinggun Member Posts: 590 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I agree with Lowrider. Nik, there's already a law against what you experienced, "reckless driving". How about all those reckless Jap motorcycles I see weaving thru traffic at high rate of speed? They should go after them too if they outlaw the phones. I guess you'll say that not everyone on a motorcycle drives that way. Well, not everyone who drives while on a cell phone is reckless. Not everyone who owns a firearm is a criminal, but pass enough laws and it could make everyone with a gun an outlaw. [This message has been edited by smokinggun (edited 01-30-2002).]
  • niklasalniklasal Member Posts: 776 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Yes, there are people out there who can talk on their phones and drive. I can also drive with my knees. I can also eat a cheesburger and fries while I drive (i'm not counting sitting in traffic or a light). It doesn't mean I should.There are a lot of things we could do simultaneously. Granted, chewing gum and walking never killed anyone, but this is not that trivial. Smokinggun, you are right. Cell phone law or no, they should be pulled over, but rest assured... Every biker I know who wove through traffic at one point or another has had reconstructive surgery or had his calf re-attached. With those guys, Darwin will prevail. BUT then again, if a bike hits you at 100 mph in your car, I doubt you will be seriously injured.Nunn, to be perfectly honest, your reply scared me. On the phone, smoking a cigarette, monitoring radio, observing traffic... That's a lot on one's mind for anyone. Cop or not, all that and up to 6 vehicles to keep an eye moving around you, I'm going to steer clear.Ultimately, I feel that our cars are not lounges. They are methods of conveyance. We are in control of 1/2 ton chuncks of metal and plastic moving at high rates of speed. It is our God given right to risk our safetyas we please. Is it our right to endanger those around us in the process?
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  • davcondavcon Member Posts: 139 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    New York State has banned the use of cell phones while operating a motor vehicle. The only allowable usage is with a handsfree device.
  • OtomanOtoman Member Posts: 584 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If anything will help you become a defensive driver it is Motorcycles..
  • offerorofferor Member Posts: 9,168
    edited November -1
    Frankly I've never seen anything to compare with the idiocy in California called "lane splitting," which believe it or not is legal. A biker may ride straight down the line between any two lanes loaded with cars in a traffic jam, at any speed he feels he can handle. Since Los Angeles freeways are jammed every day much of the time, lane splitting is a routine mode of travel. Obviously, a lane change or an open car door at the wrong instant and you've got a swiss cheese biker. P.S. You can't pull over to call much of the time because you can't drive under 45 on many highways and you can't stop on a berm except in an emergency. But I like the officer's "walk & chew gum" comment the best.
    "The 2nd Amendment is about defense, not hunting. Long live the gun shows, and reasonable access to FFLs. Join the NRA -- I'm a Life Member."
  • will270winwill270win Member Posts: 4,845
    edited November -1
    Wanna ban something? Let's find out what the anti-gunners like and ban that, not cell phones. (Except maybe those "assault" cell phones that cause crime) Teehee, That's called California logic.
    If you can't fix it with a hammer, take it to a mechanic. [email protected] ~Secret Select Society Of Suave Stylish Smoking Jackets~
  • COWBOYKIDDCOWBOYKIDD Member Posts: 261 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Sure thing.. another law? that will make it a safer place for all.. what a bunch of crap.Hey you know alot of accidents result in head injuries. Maybe a law that when you step into a vehicle you have to put on a brain bucket(helmet). That will help Joe Doe if he gets in a wreck. Not too absurd, look at motorcycle laws. I rode my Harley for ten years and had a couple almostest. But yes indeed lets make biker Joe Doe safe and make a law where he has to wear a helmet.Simply stated "we have too many dumb laws" already without creating more.Nunn. good job you gave me a chuckle. But you forgot the donut dangit.Lowrider right on
    Thieves in 3 piece suits = Politicians,Doctors & Lawyers
  • niklasalniklasal Member Posts: 776 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Those of you that are all for talking on your phones when you drive, I'm glad you have a differing opinion. That's how we all learn different views and get to understand each other. However, I find it difficult to take some posts seriously when you don't support your opinion with some kind of fact. COWBOYKID - I appreciate your feedback and your analogy. I don't like wearing a helmet either, but if I chose to or not to wear a helmet will only hurt me, not someone I run into by not paying attention. Now, I'm no advocate of helmet laws, but I choose to. One visit www.rotten.com convinced me. Check out the "Nothing comes between me and my Harley" and see what ahppened to this guy who didn't wear one and had his face hit the pavement at 40mph. By the way... He survived...Enjoy!
    [email protected]
  • Gordian BladeGordian Blade Member Posts: 1,202 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    What drives laws like the one in NY State previously mentioned is similar to what drives some (not all) gun laws: specific incidents that people want to prevent somehow without thinking it through. There was a case about two blocks from my house in a suburban neighborhood about a year ago where a middle-aged woman talking on a cell phone went too far right (not off the road) and killed a pedestrian. But about a year before that a couple more blocks away, a teenager killed a pedestrian the same way, but no cell phone was involved. A few more years before that and a few miles away, a grade school kid was killed crossing a busy road on his way to school and as far as I know, there was no cell phone involved. So what I'm saying is that in all cases, you can bet the driver was distracted by something. In none of these fatal accidents was control of the steering wheel with one hand or two the problem, it was distraction. Getting rid of cell phones won't solve the problem, especially if hands-free phones are still allowed. But even if they weren't, there's always something, even if it's only thinking about your personal problems or being too tired. Where did we get the notion that we can legislate ourselves into 100% safety?[This message has been edited by Gordian Blade (edited 01-31-2002).]
  • dhdh Member Posts: 127 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I work for Schlumberger,a world wide company,and many of the employees have company phones for work,just like I do.It is forbidden to answer a phone while your vehicle is moving.You are expected to let the phone ring and switch over to phone mail and when you can stop you can retrieve the message.This is a very new policy and I am quite sure it will be enforced,just like the seat belt rule.
  • BullzeyeBullzeye Member Posts: 3,560
    edited November -1
    Since I live in New York State, I feel I can shed some light on the motivation behind this law.*cha-CHING*Same reason for mandatory seatbelt laws, same reason for mandatory helmet laws, same reason for why the cigarette tax is the highest in the country.The idea that they give a black rats-behind about the average schmoe's well-being is hilarious to me. But that's sure how they portray it.It's just the way New York does commerce.Yes, I'm looking into moving away.
  • gunpaqgunpaq Member Posts: 5,025
    edited November -1
    NIKLASAL: This subject gets me fired up. Four years ago I was crippled for life by an idiot talking on a cell phone who veered into the wrong lane and hit me headon. That was the last cell phone call that he would ever make. He was cited for an illegal lane change and was awarded a life time residency in a nursing home at age 26 by my employer's insurance company. Had I not been driving a truck I would have probably been killed but that may have been better than dealing with spinal injuries and not being able to work again. Two weeks prior one of our drivers was broadsided by a guy who ran a stop sign while talking on a cell phone (no injuries). The answer to the problem and the debate to regulate or not, is not to restrict the use of cell phones but to make it a felony if you cause an injury accident while using one. If one has such expertise to operate a motor vehicle in traffic while engaged in an animated conversation on a cell phone then one should pay the consequences when one injurs or kills someone. I would like to also mention that two years after I was disabled one of our drivers rolled a truck off a curved bridge ramp while talking on a cell phone to his girlfriend. The guy who hit me was also talking to his girlfriend. The question to ask oneself when you just have to talk on that cell phone while driving is "Is this cell phone conversation worth the risk and do the other drivers feel lucky?".[This message has been edited by gunpaq (edited 01-31-2002).]
  • hunter280manhunter280man Member Posts: 751 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I guess I'll jump in on this one also. From my limited experience, I have seen one very severe accident from a person who pulled over to talk on a cell phone, They obviously didn't pull over far enough! I have almost hit someone trying to pull over on a buisy rural road, after they swerved and tried a head-on unsuccesfully. I like my cell, but try not to be distracted by it. I guess my opinion would be to use the existing laws to prosecute and ticket dangerous behavior.
    The Buck Stops Here...
  • sandman2234sandman2234 Member Posts: 894 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    My favorite gun-nut/shooting partner/financier of stupid items/overall best friend will not talk on the phone while driving. Can't walk and chew bubblegum, but is amazed at me for the hours I spend on the phone driving an 18 wheeler in traffic, and around town. Really gets him when i tell Him I have to go, because I am already backed up to a dock, between 2 other trucks, and the receiver is waiting on me.But I can't dial the number without looking at the phone.(too many buttons), so if I ever have a wreck with a cell phone, it will probably be during the dialing process. Hands free won't help that. Did have a phone (Highwaymaster, for all you truckers) that could be dialed using voice commands. Hit one button and then start talking to it to get the phone call made. Too bad the calls were .50 cent a minute. Most trucking companies disabled the dial out properties, unless it was 911 or to dispatch. But you could call highwaymaster and have it turned back on, using your own credit card. Cell phones are only dangerous if you let them become dangerous. Pay attention to what you are doing, and if you can't pay attention to what your doing... HANG UP.
    Have Gun, will travel
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