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flying to cancun- anyone been there?

rambo rebelrambo rebel Member Posts: 4,028
edited December 2001 in General Discussion
going next week for 3 days- anyone been there and have any advice to offer? what to see/do or what to avoid? (besides the water) where can I find good stuff to bring back?on or off the beaten tourist trap. may just hang at the hotel and sip cold ones although I can do that here. your input would be appreciated. thanks - v

Comments

  • TARZANSEALTARZANSEAL Member Posts: 27 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    GO SCUBA DIVING THERE AND COZUMEL.CANCUN IS VERY TOURISTY. THE LARGER HOTELS TREAT THEIR WATER. YOU WONT GET SICK STAYING WITH THEM. EATING THE FOOD AWAY FROM THE MAJOR HOTELS IS RISKY.PETTY THIEVERY IS COMMON. LEAVE NO VALUABLES ON THE BEACH OR IN YOUR TAXIS. ALSO OFF THE TOURIST BEAT THE BARS WILL SERVE YOU 1.2 BEER AT FULL PRICE.DO NOT RENT A CAR IN MEXICO I SAY AGAIN DO NOT RENT A CAR IN MEXICO FROM ANYBODY. HAVE YOUR HOTEL GET YOU A DRIVER AND CAR FOR THE DAY $50.00?.THEIR IS A CABANA 10 MILES OUT OF TOWN CALLED MIGALS. SURVE THE BEST IGUANA TACOS AND EL SOL BEER ON THE BEACH. HAVE A GOOD TIME I'M JEALOUS.
  • BullzeyeBullzeye Member Posts: 3,560
    edited November -1
    This is very informative. It is from the US State Department's Travel Information website. Pardon the length, I think you will get something out of it. You may want to cut, paste, and print it:
    American citizens should remember that when they are in Cancun, they are subject to the laws of Mexico. An arrest or a serious accident in Cancun can not only spoil travel plans, but can also result in a difficult legal or medical situation, sometimes at great expense to the traveler. Mexican law can impose harsh penalties for violations, and the fact that someone is a U.S. citizen in no way exempts him or her from full prosecution under the Mexican criminal justice system. If U.S. citizens find themselves in legal trouble, they should contact the U.S. Consular Agency in Cancun or the U.S. Consulate in Merida (see "Contact Information" below). U.S. consular officials in Mexico can visit the arrested American citizen in prison, provide information about the Mexican legal system, and furnish a list of Mexican attorneys, among other assistance, but they cannot arrange for Mexican officials to release the arrested American. Excessive alcohol consumption and unruly or uncontrolled behavior can lead to serious problems with Mexican authorities. Alcohol is involved in the vast majority of arrests, accidents, violent crimes and deaths suffered by American tourists in Cancun. Disturbing the peace, lewd or indecent behavior, littering, driving under the influence, drinking on the street or on public transportation, using public transportation without payment, or making obscene or insulting remarks are considered criminal activities by Mexican authorities. The importation, purchase, possession or use of drugs can incur severe penalties, including imprisonment without bail for up to a year before a case is tried and imprisonment of several years following a conviction. Cancun is now a fairly large city, approaching 500,000 inhabitants, with increasing reports of crime. Crimes against the person, such as rape, commonly but not exclusively occur at night or in the early morning hours, and sometimes involve alcohol and the discotheque environment. Therefore, it is important for travelers to be aware of their surroundings and to take general precautions. To protect against property crimes, valuables should be left in a safe place or not brought at all. Do not leave belongings on the beach while swimming, and keep your passport and other valuables in a hotel safe. If you are a victim of a crime, immediately notify the U.S. Consular Agency in Cancun or the U.S. Consulate in Merida at the telephone numbers provided below. NOTE: The Department of State wishes to alert gun owners to leave their guns at home when they go to Mexico. Mexico has severe penalties for taking in any type of firearm, weapon, or ammunition without first obtaining written authorization from Mexican authorities. It does not matter whether U.S. citizens are licensed to carry the firearm in the United States, or if they unintentionally transport it while driving in their vehicle, or have it in their luggage while traveling by commercial or private plane or boat. It also does not matter if visitors to Mexico are U.S. law enforcement or military officials. Mexican authorities strictly enforce laws restricting the entry of firearms and ammunition along their borders and at air or seaports. Each year dozens of Americans are arrested or fined in Mexico in connection with weapons violations. About 35 U.S. citizens are currently incarcerated in Mexican prisons on weapons-related charges. Many of them inadvertently transported a firearm that they were licensed to carry in the United States without realizing they were violating Mexican laws. Some were driving across the border for a day visit, to shop or to eat in a restaurant. Remember that if caught bringing in a firearm, ammunition, or other weapon, Mexican authorities may confiscate a visitor's vehicle or other personal property and place the individual under arrest. Detained Americans may spend months in pre-trial detention while their case is being investigated. If convicted, they may face several years in a Mexican prison. While the U.S. consul can visit U.S. citizens in jail, make sure that they are being treated humanely, and provide a list of attorneys to assist with the Mexican judicial process, the U.S. consul cannot get U.S. citizens released from jail. U.S. citizens who approach Mexico along the land border or who arrive by boat should check carefully to ensure that someone else has not left weapons or ammunition in the vehicle or boat. If U.S. citizen visitors realize they are in possession of firearms, ammunition, or other weapons, they should not proceed into Mexico. They should not attempt to enter Mexico - even to turn around - or go through Mexican Customs. All land border crossings have pull-offs or turnarounds on the U.S. side. The only way to legally import firearms and ammunition into Mexico is to secure a permit in advance from the Mexican Embassy in Washington, D.C. or from a Mexican Consulate in the United States. Mariners who have obtained a Mexican firearm permit should contact Mexican port officials before attempting to enter Mexican waters, to learn about specific procedures to report and secure weapons and ammunition.
  • the loveable rat...the loveable rat... Member Posts: 969 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    check out tulum(1 hr south), chichen itza, and cozumel...bring your fish pole and fish the estuary at night w/ the locals or try the flats...what a hoot!
  • 7mm_ultra_mag_is_king7mm_ultra_mag_is_king Member Posts: 676 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks bullzeye, I have crossed the border several time from El Paso, Larado and San Luise AZ( I know I spelled it wrong) and never knew just what the place was like. Kinda went in blind thinking I would be ok with the laws. Boy was I wrong!
    when all else fails........................
  • simonbssimonbs Member Posts: 1,051 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I went to Cancun on my senior trip.You can find nice leather, silver, and marble (chess sets) goods for great prices in the street shops. Don't pay what they ask for the stuff though. Dabble with them on the prices hard, and they'll come way down. The money exchange rate was around 8 pesos to one buck when I was there. It would fluctuate up to 8.5 and down to 7.5. Buy pesos at the higher rate and sell them back at the lower rate. I made a little extra cash doing this.There are buses that run up and down the island that will take you anywhere you want to go. I think a bus ride is 3 pesos. If you take a cab, dabble with the cab drivers too, they'll come off their rates.I stayed too lit up to do anything productive like snorkeling or sight seeing, but I wish I would've done stuff like that now. Although, the sights in the clubs, on the beach, and by the resort pool were really nice, wink, wink.
  • HAL-9000HAL-9000 Member Posts: 38 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    There are tours you can set up at the hotel.Tulum is great. Go to the big park XEL-HA.Take the little speed boat snorkling trip, what a blast. Senior Frogs for the night life. Last but not least....The pirate lobster booze cruze, a real good time.To get around town take the bus, cheap and gets you there, cabs are ok but cost a lot more(you'll have to take cabs at night)Everyone of the tours will come and pick you up at your hotel. Carry bottled water with you, don't eat anything raw! All resturants carry bottles water. Take about $50.00 in one dollar bills as tipping money, $1.00 is a good tip. Beers and Soda on the street cost a buck.Common sence rules, whats illegal here is really illegal there.you'll have a great time.Happy New YearHAL
  • BullzeyeBullzeye Member Posts: 3,560
    edited November -1
    The Mexicans are Nazis when it comes to firearms.Like the passage above says, you bring even a fully licensed weapon into Mexico without prior government approval and you will most likely spend several years in a Mexican jail.
  • mudgemudge Member Posts: 4,551
    edited November -1
    You didn't say where you're staying. Most hotels are within a block of the beach though. Taking the bus is good advice. One more piece of advice HAGGLE!!!!! About EVERYTHING. The most they can do is say NO!As far as money exchange goes, I usually exchange each day if I we're staying a week or more. The rate fluctuates and you can sometime save some $$.Mudge the world traveler
    I can't come to work today. The voices said, STAY HOME AND CLEAN THE GUNS!
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