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Small town LEO question

cbxjeffcbxjeff Member Posts: 14,686 ✭✭✭
edited February 2017 in General Discussion
I moved to this little town (pop of 488 in 2010) back in '82. At the time we had a town marshal that was a great guy. He passed a number of years ago and was replaced with two local policemen and new cars. I've been wondering who they report to and what training they have. Does the county oversee their credentials?

Thanks guys,
It's too late for me, save yourself.

Comments

  • us55840us55840 Member Posts: 31,304 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I'm sure your town mayor can answer your question.

    No town mayor? Contact the local county commissioner.

    Just a thought.
    "This country, with its institutions, belongs to the people who inhabit it. Whenever they shall grow weary of the existing government, they can exercise their constitutional right of amending it, or exercise their revolutionary right to overthrow it." Abraham Lincoln
  • AlpineAlpine Member Posts: 14,466 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Credentials would be mandated by the state, generally POST.

    Marshall would be county, police would be city.
    ?The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money.?
    Margaret Thatcher

    "There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics."
    Mark Twain
  • nmyersnmyers Member Posts: 16,316 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    It all depends upon the city, county, & state laws. In most places, you need to be sworn in, & sign a register, in order to make an arrest. You may have limited powers in surrounding jurisdictions.

    At one time, the mayor could just pin a badge on you if he liked you. Today, no department would put an officer on the street without extensive investigation & training in a certified academy. Firearms certification would be required for armed officers.

    Small town PDs & some county PDs often pay other jurisdictions to train their officer recruits; it may be too expensive for them to have their own training academy.

    Neal
  • shilowarshilowar Member Posts: 38,807 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Your local government would be the place to inquire or your local courthouse. Each state is different in their governmental subdivisions.
  • LesWVaLesWVa Member Posts: 10,490 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    The one that governs the town would be over the police force.

    Here the elected Mayor is over the force. Policy is same as the Sheriff's Deputy. LEO must attend and complete the states police academy before they are allowed to preform the duties of an officer. Canidates considered for hire can ride with officers to learn the ropes up until the next class at the academy starts. But about all they can do is flag traffic.

    Also due to the high turnover rate for town clowns. The Mayor is also put in as chief of police. He can only draw a paycheck for being one or the other. But not both due to "double dipping" laws.
  • fideaufideau Member Posts: 12,023
    edited November -1
    Unfortunately, small town police are for the most part just one step up from Mall Cop. Kojak wannabes. Not every one, but enough to be skeptical of most.
  • JamesRKJamesRK Member Posts: 25,672 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    One thing I didn't like about the Andy Griffith Show was they had Andy, the county sheriff, reporting to the town mayor.
    EDIT:
    On a side note, something I just happened to think of today, the mayor of Mayberry on TV was also Chester on Radio Gunsmoke.
    The road to hell is paved with COMPROMISE.
  • montanajoemontanajoe Member, Moderator Posts: 51,003 ******
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by JamesRK
    One thing I didn't like about the Andy Griffith Show was they had Andy, the county sheriff, reporting to the town mayor.
    That never occurred to me,but now that you mention it,,[:0][:0][:0]
  • WranglerWrangler Member Posts: 5,788
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by cbxjeff
    I moved to this little town (pop of 488 in 2010) back in '82. At the time we had a town marshal that was a great guy. He passed a number of years ago and was replaced with two local policemen and new cars. I've been wondering who they report to and what training they have. Does the county oversee their credentials?

    Thanks guys,


    Your state is the one that should oversee licensing of Peace Officers. In Texas, it is the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement (TCOLE).

    http://www.tcole.texas.gov
  • shilowarshilowar Member Posts: 38,807 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by fideau
    Unfortunately, small town police are for the most part just one step up from Mall Cop. Kojak wannabes. Not every one, but enough to be skeptical of most.


    Typically low pay, poor benefits, and less than stellar equipment leads to the hiring of officers that likely had to leave previous LE jobs under dubious circumstances. You get what you pay for.
  • john carrjohn carr Member Posts: 1,717 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by cbxjeff
    I moved to this little town (pop of 488 in 2010) back in '82. At the time we had a town marshal that was a great guy. He passed a number of years ago and was replaced with two local policemen and new cars. I've been wondering who they report to and what training they have. Does the county oversee their credentials?

    Thanks guys,

    If your little town is anything like the one I live about a mile from, I believe they would report to the mayor and city council. We no longer have any LEO's specifically working for the town and rely on the county sheriff who make their rounds. Our mayor, who is an "Eddie Albert type of guy in Green Acres", called me a couple years ago and said he was thinking we ought to have a marshal to keep things in order. I asked him why he thought this and he said that he had had complaints that one resident was urinating in his yard. No marshal was hired. Its possible that this matter could have to be cleared with the county sheriff, but I'm not sure.
  • JamesRKJamesRK Member Posts: 25,672 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by john carr
    If your little town is anything like the one I live about a mile from, I believe they would report to the mayor and city council. We no longer have any LEO's specifically working for the town and rely on the county sheriff who make their rounds. Our mayor, who is an "Eddie Albert type of guy in Green Acres", called me a couple years ago and said he was thinking we ought to have a marshal to keep things in order. I asked him why he thought this and he said that he had had complaints that one resident was urinating in his yard. No marshal was hired. Its possible that this matter could have to be cleared with the county sheriff, but I'm not sure.
    The mayor should just tell the resident to piss in his own damn yard.
    The road to hell is paved with COMPROMISE.
  • 1BigGuy1BigGuy Member Posts: 4,032 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The small town/village in which I reside did away with their local police force years ago and entirely contracts with the county sheriff's department now.
  • Aztngundoc22Aztngundoc22 Member Posts: 2,070 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    OK :

    What state ? and Yes : Bottom line , POST is a major factor in all of this , a local township : Mayor , police board , police commisioner , ect.ect. : Ask around .......

    Thanks !!!
    The more people I meet : The more I like my Dog :twisted: :twisted: :twisted:


    I Grew Old Too Fast (And Smart Too damn Slow !!!) !!! :o :?
  • mlincolnmlincoln Member Posts: 5,039 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by shilowar
    quote:Originally posted by fideau
    Unfortunately, small town police are for the most part just one step up from Mall Cop. Kojak wannabes. Not every one, but enough to be skeptical of most.


    Typically low pay, poor benefits, and less than stellar equipment leads to the hiring of officers that likely had to leave previous LE jobs under dubious circumstances. You get what you pay for.


    This weekend I took a tour of the local fire department with the cub scouts. I was stunned by how fancy, new, and sophisticated all the equipment was, and by how the firefighters knew their jobs up, down, left and right. The amount of technical knowledge they had and the amount of training they do were stunning.

    Then again, taxes in our area are sky high, and their budget is huge.
  • NavybatNavybat Member Posts: 7,006
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by JamesRK
    quote:Originally posted by john carr
    If your little town is anything like the one I live about a mile from, I believe they would report to the mayor and city council. We no longer have any LEO's specifically working for the town and rely on the county sheriff who make their rounds. Our mayor, who is an "Eddie Albert type of guy in Green Acres", called me a couple years ago and said he was thinking we ought to have a marshal to keep things in order. I asked him why he thought this and he said that he had had complaints that one resident was urinating in his yard. No marshal was hired. Its possible that this matter could have to be cleared with the county sheriff, but I'm not sure.
    The mayor should just tell the resident to piss in his own damn yard.


    James, on a side note, I love the portraits you have on your signature line. [:D]
  • mrs102mrs102 Member Posts: 907 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Another possibility is these officers are full time employees elsewhere and work in your little village part time.

    In my area the Sheriff may also enter into a contract with small communities to supply police officer(s)/deputy(s)for agreed numbers of hours and times of day for a negotiated price.
  • JamesRKJamesRK Member Posts: 25,672 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Navybat
    James, on a side note, I love the portraits you have on your signature line. [:D]
    Thanks.
    The road to hell is paved with COMPROMISE.
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