.

Dangers of reloading

frankcastle13frankcastle13 Member Posts: 1,182 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited February 2007 in General Discussion
I was just wondering how dangerous reloading is. I've been trying to tell my mom I would like to reload once I get my hunting rifle but she keeps telling me its dangerous. I mean I know dealing with some of those components there's gonna be some danger, but I dont think that it's that bad. I'm almost 17 and she wants me to only do it with supervision of my uncle or grandpa, who live 3 hrs away, or my stepdad, who is in Washington DC right now. I just think buying .300 magnum ammo will start to add up quick.

Comments

  • CubsloverCubslover Member Posts: 18,601
    edited November -1
    Reloading requires your utmost attention, knowledge about what you are doing and the possible effects of what will happen. Reloading itself is not dangerous, common sense will keep you safe. Buy a reloading manual or two and read them cover to cover, then read them again. "The ABC's of Reloading" is a FANTASTIC book. I taught myself with the help of some people on here and a few manuals. Remember it's Quality over Quanity, Safety over Quality. Common sense things are like, wear safety glasses when priming cases, don't smoke or have candles around you, no TV, I think a radio is ok, some don't. Attention to detail on each step is crucial to create a good round and to do that safely. NO shortcuts!
    Half of the lives they tell about me aren't true.
  • frankcastle13frankcastle13 Member Posts: 1,182 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Yeah I'll make sure and check that out. She acts like I'm gonna be reloading by candlelight while smoking a cigarette, with a propane heater going.
  • Slow_HandSlow_Hand Member Posts: 2,835
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by frankcastle13
    Yeah I'll make sure and check that out. She acts like I'm gonna be reloading by candlelight while smoking a cigarette, with a propane heater going.


    I'll bet that there are a few dimwits out there who probably have done exactly that AND are in a continuous low orbit somewhere over Australia as you read this.[;)][:D][:D]
  • CubsloverCubslover Member Posts: 18,601
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Slow_Hand
    quote:Originally posted by frankcastle13
    Yeah I'll make sure and check that out. She acts like I'm gonna be reloading by candlelight while smoking a cigarette, with a propane heater going.


    I'll bet that there are a few dimwits out there who probably have done exactly that AND are in a continuous low orbit somewhere over Australia as you read this.[;)][:D][:D]
    [:D]
    Half of the lives they tell about me aren't true.
  • p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    Let you mom know that reloading is no more dangerous than having a frying pan full of hot oil on the stove, or using a pressure cooker. Diligence and attention to detail is required. Like the cooking oil, reloading is a fire hazard rather than an explosive hazard.
  • jbw1776jbw1776 Member Posts: 3,056
    edited November -1
    The dangers of actually reloading, while there, are minimal. Common sense and paying attention to what you are doing should eleminate those. I'd worry more about firing a double charge because you didn't pay attention and devote the time needed to do the first part correctly.

    If you think you can devote the UNINTERUPTED time (no phone calls or friend stopping by to chat, etc.) and concentrate on what you are doing, then it can be a very rewarding hobby.

    Ben
  • Ray BRay B Member Posts: 11,822
    edited November -1
    Make sure you know what you are using- buy powder and primers only in their factory package w/unbroken seals. An example- a fellow bought some powder at a gun show. The can was for 4895- a fairly fast, as far as rifle powder is concerned, powder. He loaded up some 30-30s and went to the range. The first one he fired put his Marlin 336 into several pieces. His arms, chest and face had several cuts. Turns out the fellow from whom he bought the powder had bought a large canister of Bullseye, a very fast powder by any comparison, and had put it into one pound cans that he had laying around, and made no attempt to identify it. It was estimated that the pressure inside the Marlin was better than 250,000 psi; about five times the maximum.
  • n/an/a Member Posts: 168,427
    edited November -1
    Another point not listed by anyone yet: Lead!

    I have a friend who had to stop his reloading due to lead levels in his blood riseing to dangerous levels.

    I am sure there are precautions you can take for this, but since I don't reload yet I am not sure what these are.
  • brier-49brier-49 Member Posts: 6,326 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I reload using lead bullets.I cast,size and lube all my own.I have a large exhust fan over my pot, wear surgical gloves while sizing and reloading.I have no noticable lead levels in my blood.Some people who handle lead just don't take precautions to avoid lead poisoning.I have been doing this for about 10 years.No problems.I've heard many stories of people casting in their kitchen using the exhust fan over the stove,not nearly strong enough.Casting is done in the garage,I size and reload in the house, never had a problem.Read the books,and stay focused on what you are doing.
  • abcguns2abcguns2 Member Posts: 2,320 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    O.K. , I Do Not shoot ( nor will sell in our shop ) any RELOADS , I used to reload , its time consuming and a pain in the kiester and I have have seen more problems with reloads (mine and others) but at the same time almost No Problems with factory loads ...I used to work @ Winchester (as a Gunsmith) and have shot more ammo than most people have ever seen ...With No Problems ...
    Thanks !!!
    d.a.stearns
    Gunsmith / LEO
    Niota , Tn
  • jimbowbyjimbowby Member Posts: 3,496
    edited November -1
    [8D]--Very good advice from these guys---

    --just a question-is this your first rifle ?? and have you shot it yet ???

    --A 300 mag is a BIG gun for a youngun, you'll need some real help if you're goint to reload for it. just be methodical and careful--

    --[8D][8D]--=JIMBO
  • codenamepaulcodenamepaul Member Posts: 2,931
    edited November -1
    I do not reload-let's start there. I have tried it under the tuteledge of likely, the only person I'd ever trust with my life. Because-ultimately-that is what you are doing. I would suggest a mentor with not only vast experience, but a no BS-never take a shortcut with anything- principle of life. It is a hobby I know well enough (and myself) to not likely get into, because of my lifestyle and its inherent distractions. I have, however,shot thousands of my tutors reloads and never had so much as a squib.

    In short-have fun, stay safe, find a tutor/mentor that you mom will trust.
  • buddybbuddyb Member Posts: 3,822 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    codenamepaul gave some good advice.I have been loading my own for many years but when I started I knew only one experienced handloader.He lived about 30 miles away but I called him many times for advice.Read all the reloading info you can find and do like mom wants and have someone around when you first start loading.After a while she will know that you are mature enough to reload and lose most of the fear she has about your safety.Be careful and you can post any questions here.Most of us old guys will help you if we can.
  • WulfmannWulfmann Member Posts: 4,845 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Reloading is not about saving money. You will never recoup the investment in what is needed to reload unless you are shooting thousands of rounds.
    Reloading is about custom tailoring your loads for accuracy or a particular application. I much prefer my loaded ammo to factory but will not shoot other people's reloads.
    I know exactly what I did. I have no idea what someone else did!
    It does expand your understanding about ammunition greatly and is itself a separate hobby within a hobby.
    A 300 winmag is a gun you shoot very little so if that was my round I would stick with factory.
    I am sure your a bright guy but one day you will understand when I say your mom is right here. You should have experienced help.
    Its not dangerous if you know what you are doing.
    Same with flying an F-16.

    Wulfmann
    3YUCmbB.jpg
    "Fools learn from their own mistakes. I learn from the mistakes of others"
    Otto von Bismarck
  • allen griggsallen griggs Member Posts: 32,961 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    You'll put your eye out.
  • FrancFFrancF Member, Moderator Posts: 35,278 ******
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Wulfmann

    Reloading is about custom tailoring your loads for accuracy or a particular application. I much prefer my loaded ammo to factory but will not shoot other people's reloads.
    I know exactly what I did. I have no idea what someone else did!
    It does expand your understanding about ammunition greatly and is itself a separate hobby within a hobby.
    Wulfmann


    That sums it up nicely. Knowing the dangers of WHAT could happen is a plus, but if you pay attention you will not have any problems. Worst thing I have ever happen is a bad primer here and there.
  • idsman75idsman75 Member Posts: 14,524
    edited November -1
    .300 Win Mag or .300 Wby Mag? I know it has nothing to do with the topic but I'm just curious. I just bought my first magnum rifle--a new Remington Sendero SF II in .300 Win Mag. I thought about reloading for it myself. I have to wait until I get to where I am moving. If I live in on-post housing then there may be restrictions. I know that reloading was prohibited in military housing when I was at Fort Lewis, WA.

    If we both get into it then maybe we can swap recipes or something. What kind of rifle did you get? Which .300 Magnum cartrige is it chambered for?
  • FrancFFrancF Member, Moderator Posts: 35,278 ******
    edited November -1
    I don't have a .300 but I do know that baby drinks lots of powder!
  • KEVD18KEVD18 Member Posts: 15,037
    edited November -1
    i think reloading is very badass
  • bpostbpost Member Posts: 30,978 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by frankcastle13
    I was just wondering how dangerous reloading is. I've been trying to tell my mom I would like to reload once I get my hunting rifle but she keeps telling me its dangerous. I mean I know dealing with some of those components there's gonna be some danger, but I dont think that it's that bad. I'm almost 17 and she wants me to only do it with supervision of my uncle or grandpa, who live 3 hrs away, or my stepdad, who is in Washington DC right now. I just think buying .300 magnum ammo will start to add up quick.

    I'm 49 and have been loading on my own since I was 14. Get a book and read it. Look at the equipment and understand the process. The danger is in not understanding; not in doing.

    P.S. Moms tend to place unfounded phobia's upon the shoulders of children. Tell her to trust in her being a good parent and you being a responsible teen. (hey, Responsible teen, that is a oxymoron)
  • john wjohn w Member Posts: 4,104
    edited November -1
    no tv, no radio, no distractions period. Double check your powder measurement and double check the amount of powder in the cases you have charged before seating bullet and make sure it is the right powder for your application. When you prime or reload always wear safety glasses and keep the powder off the bench except for the powder you are using and keep it capped at all times, other than that it is easy and fun but takes your full attention.
  • GUNFUNCOGUNFUNCO Member Posts: 2,920 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I think handloading, when done by a responsible person is no more dangerous than putting gas in your lawnmower and cutting the grass. If you are not responsible enough to reload, you should not be cutting the lawn either.[:D]
  • frankcastle13frankcastle13 Member Posts: 1,182 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    once again thanks for all of your help. i'm not sure about the 300 mag any nore because my uncle said he could get me a Ruger no 1 in 30-06 for only 400 bucks and I really like his.
  • JustCJustC Member, Moderator Posts: 16,036 ******
    edited November -1
    Reloading is simple,..but this is of course ASSUMING you have educated yourself BEFORE you begin. The science of it is really quite simple,..but if you don't apply it within it's limitations, you will experience quite the increased education in both metalurgy and plastic surgery.

    THAT being said,..your mother really has no reason to be concerned. If you are the type who can carry good grades, you can also reload harmlessly. A simple grasp of the method coupled with an ADHEREANCE to the loading manuals powder charges and suggested OAL's will keep you plenty safe.

    MISTAKES!!!!!
    1. not paying attention each round,..every time
    2. experimenting where you shouldn't be, until you know your dookie
    3. thinking one powder is as good as any other
    4. thinking you can get away with not having one of the few basic tools you need to load safely
    5. NOT HAVING READ AT LEAST 2 LOAD MANUALS PRIOR TO STARTING
    6. being ignorant of high pressure sings
  • n/an/a Member Posts: 168,427
    edited November -1
    Another good book is the cartridge book of the worlds ammunition. Gives all the specs for virtually any round and the different powders and different bullets with ballistics for reloading..27.95.
  • HighballHighball Member Posts: 15,755
    edited November -1
    You win your Mom over by acting responsible...you take the trash out when asked, you pick up your room...that sort of thing.

    What does picking up your room have to do with anything ? Simple....leaving several cannisters of powder open on a loading table is DISASTER waiting to happen..allowing primers to fall carelessly about...PRIMERS are High Explosive...dump them into a single heap in acontainer...and the resultant explosion will blow your hand off...and perhaps your eyes, also...

    I have been reloading for 40-odd years...and a safer, more enjoyable 'hobby' can scarely be imagined. The rounds that I have had trouble with count less then the fingers of both hands....and I still have ten fingers, by the way...tens of thousands of rounds, over the years....

    Ignore the 'no cost savings'...or the "reloads are junk' comments...because those are precisely the reloads I will not shoot...other guys that refuse to take the time and trouble to 'get it right'....and if you cannot take the time to study the subject inside and out...do the gun community a favor and don't reload.

    Simply put..stupidly done, reloading is deadly...for you and anyone within shrapnel distance.

    Study, learn, ask questions....and reloading is addictive and endlessly fun.
  • bobskibobski Member Posts: 17,868 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    if youre not getting straight a's in science or bio lab, dont try it unless accompanied by an adult skilled at reloading. regardless of your age, reloading should always require a tutor. its an exacting science. almost or close enough will kill you.
    Retired Naval Aviation
    Former Member U.S. Navy Shooting Team
    Former NSSA All American
    Navy Distinguished Pistol Shot
    MO, CT, VA.
  • victorlvlbvictorlvlb Member Posts: 5,004
    edited November -1
    Reloading is safer then hunting with the vice president or riding with Ted K, its probably safer then living in a big city.You can reload better rounds for your rifle, pistol then you can buy across the counter.The only reason you won't save money reloading is that you'll load a hundred rounds and shoot them all at the range.Where as if you bought two boxes of store bought ammo , you'd only shoot two boxes of ammo.You do need to do your home work and watch a good dvd,( if you can't find a tutor),Then follow the directions for the shell you reloading for.
  • bpostbpost Member Posts: 30,978 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hey; tell your mom that reloading is a lot safer than SEX. That will get you the best reloading equipment sold.[:D][:D][:D][:D][:D][:D]
  • lfi guylfi guy Member Posts: 68 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    [}:)] Pay attention to to the brass, correct length, no splits, or deep dents/nicks. No powder, low powder, and especially DOUBLE charges of powder are your chief items to look out for. Use the crimp die to keep bullets from moving deeper into the case from recoil.

    Suggest you don't cast bullets because of potential lead poisoning. Wear a respirator in an indoor range.
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