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S&W Hand Ejector

ruger41ruger41 Member Posts: 14,437 ✭✭✭
edited August 2008 in General Discussion
I'm thinking of getting one in .32/20 or .32 Long-as they seem to be much cheaper than the .44 special versions. I want one that was made after 1905 and I see there are different transitions but I don't know what those are--are they just internal things or options--my gun blue book doesn't say what the changes are. I already own a 1905 Colt Army Special in .38spl so I'd like the Smith in a different caliber. Any of you own one and if so do you shoot it--I also like the 1917's in .45acp so I guess that is an option too-thanks for any help.

Comments

  • ruger41ruger41 Member Posts: 14,437 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I'm kicking myself as well--I had the chance to buy a .32/20 square butt for $275 that was in decent condition and I passed on it because I was in the middle of moving from CA to WA. I'd love to get a .44 special triple lock but they are just out of my price range. I know they make "new" versions of them in S&W's Classic line but I like the looks of a gently used older gun.
  • DocDoc Member Posts: 13,899 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The K frame Military & Police Model of 1905 (4th Change) remained pretty much unchanged until 1944 when the new safety block was added to lessen the chance of an AD when the gun was dropped.

    In 1946 the post-war version was introduced with the short-throw action.

    I always thought that a 32 caliber M&P would be fun but for some reason I never bought one.
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    Too old to live...too young to die...
  • ruger41ruger41 Member Posts: 14,437 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    oh cool Doc-i did not know there were long or short throw actions--there seem to be quite a few for sale on GB at ok prices and i'm gonna go to a gun show here this weekend to see if i can find one i like.
  • Marc1301Marc1301 Member Posts: 31,822 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    What was the difference in the Regulation Police .32?
    I sold one 12/2006. I think it had something to do with the grips, and the butt.
    It was fairly old, but I don't remember the date now,.....serial number was 5098** range.

    Also sold a .38 M&P 1905/4th. change 4374** SN. That was 1/2007.
    "Beam me up Scotty, there's no intelligent life down here." - William Shatner
  • DocDoc Member Posts: 13,899 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The Regulation Police was built on the I frame, much smaller than the K frame. The largest caliber offered on the I frame was the 38 S&W because the 38 Special was too long for the cylinder window in the frame.
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    Too old to live...too young to die...
  • Marc1301Marc1301 Member Posts: 31,822 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Doc
    The Regulation Police was built on the I frame, much smaller than the K frame. The largest caliber offered on the I frame was the 38 S&W because the 38 Special was too long for the cylinder window in the frame.

    Doc,....it also had IIRC a round butt, with a set of walnut "square butt" grips.
    Someone told me that was another difference. I don't really know.
    Certainly much smaller frame than the M&P.

    It was the original nickel finish, and was 98% at least.
    The fellow that bought it here was thrilled.
    "Beam me up Scotty, there's no intelligent life down here." - William Shatner
  • DocDoc Member Posts: 13,899 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    They have become popular with collectors in recent years.
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    Too old to live...too young to die...
  • ruger41ruger41 Member Posts: 14,437 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    ah so that small version is an I frame--I did not know S&W even had an I frame--I know Colt does. I have seen a few of those smaller framed S&W's at gun shows--they are pretty cool.
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