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boresighter

michaelsmichaels Member Posts: 6 ✭✭
edited January 2012 in Ask the Experts
Hey all,

Im wanting to get a laser boresighter for a buddy for christmas, any advice on a cheaper yet good quality laser boresight.

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    michaelsmichaels Member Posts: 6 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I am currently in the market for a boresighter for occasional use and am wondering what you would consider the best choice. Which are best...the mechanical or laser borsighters? I would like to use it to boresight an in-line muzzleloader (.50 cal) and ultimately see other possibilities as I upgrade optics on various other rifles.
    Thanks.
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    perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,107 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    MECHANICAL one. is my vote one with an ARBOR for each caliber from 17 -50

    EDITMore damage has been done POKING a cleaning rod down the bore then these precision turned arbors . as to the magnetic ones this relies on the muzzle to be turned Exactly 90 DEGREES in relation to the bore I have seen muzzle get dinged but the crown is recessed and accuracy is great. Not trying to argue but just stating my expierence.
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    tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    The best bore sighter you can get is a good rifle vise, to hold your rifle absolutely still, and a paper target on the wall, about 20-25 feet away. This IS "bore sighting". Looking thru the bore, center the target in the bore, and lock the rifle into place with the target centered. Then adjust your sight accordingly.

    The devices, that you refer to as bore sighter's, and are frequently marketed as such, are actually columnator's. They are supposed to help you get the scope's vertically, and horizontally squared to the rifle. Actually a level, and a plumb bob, or two plumb bobs can do this for you as well.

    I don't particularly like the idea of sticking something metallic in the muzzle end of the rifle, that may, can, and will mess up the crown(the last thing that touches a departing bullet). They have fooled, and disserviced many a shooter's over the years, who, unknowingly have confided in the "manufacturer's must know what they are doing" idealogy. The manufactures make things to sell. Any thing to sell to put money in their pockets. In these times one must use that thing attached to the top of their neck, to percieve these things.

    Yes, the true bore sighting, does not work well with fixed breech, or weapons where you don't have open access to the breech end of the bore, but there are ways around that too.

    Lastly, if you are still so inclined to spend your hard earned George Washingtons on this device, I would endorse the magnetic one by Leupold.

    Best

    EDIT 1

    perry shooter,

    While I do agree with most of your statement, I don't agree with the "precision turned"term. I know what it takes to precision turn, and granted they are mostly done on a CNC machine center, at the cost of some of the lower grade makes and model's, it cannot be that precise of a machining operation.

    Best
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    llamallama Member Posts: 2,637 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by tsr1965
    The best bore sighter you can get is a good rifle vise, to hold your rifle absolutely still, and a paper target on the wall, about 20-25 feet away. This IS "bore sighting". Looking thru the bore, center the target in the bore, and lock the rifle into place with the target centered. Then adjust your sight accordingly.

    The devices, that you refer to as bore sighter's, and are frequently marketed as such, are actually columnator's. They are supposed to help you get the scope's vertically, and horizontally squared to the rifle. Actually a level, and a plumb bob, or two plumb bobs can do this for you as well.

    I don't particularly like the idea of sticking something metallic in the muzzle end of the rifle, that may, can, and will mess up the crown(the last thing that touches a departing bullet). They have fooled, and disserviced many a shooter's over the years, who, unknowingly have confided in the "manufacturer's must know what they are doing" idealogy. The manufactures make things to sell. Any thing to sell to put money in their pockets. In these times one must use that thing attached to the top of their neck, to percieve these things.

    Yes, the true bore sighting, does not work well with fixed breech, or weapons where you don't have open access to the breech end of the bore, but there are ways around that too.

    Lastly, if you are still so inclined to spend your hard earned George Washingtons on this device, I would endorse the magnetic one by Leupold.

    Best


    Great advice, hard to do wtih something besides a single shot or bolt gun....
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    HawkshawHawkshaw Member Posts: 1,016 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    +++++ For the Leupold---- Hawkshaw
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    bull300wsmbull300wsm Member Posts: 3,289
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by perry shooter
    MECHANICAL one. is my vote one with an ARBOR for each caliber from 17 -50


    +1
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    fordsixfordsix Member Posts: 8,554 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    i have had very good luck with the laser types
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