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Double action Civil War percussion revolver?

GunHawkeGunHawke Member Posts: 576 ✭✭✭
edited July 2007 in Ask the Experts
The sunny south again [8D],

Got some sun on purpose today and waxed down the stock and forearm of my Rem. 11-48 ya'll have helped me with!!

Here's one....I was watching the 1st DVD in the series of Ken Burns Civil War and noticed a soldier's portrait where he is holding a large frame double action percussion revolver!!?? I only guess at the double action because of the trigger attitude being set mid trigger guaud like a S&W mod. 10. Any guesses as to what I saw? Is the double action guess correct?

I LOVE that documentary!!!!

Thanks again,
Jim
GunHawke

Comments

  • rhmc24rhmc24 Member Posts: 1,984 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I didn't see it but most likely a Starr DA. There were two Starrs, DA & SA. In the Civil War era there were English DAs.

    The Starr DA was not a DA as we know them today. The trigger had a little slider on it that when positioned properly, the trigger cocked the piece. The trigger finger is the placed behind the cocking trigger and the piece is fired as with a normal SA. In the other position of the slider put it into the SA mode. The hammer was cocked and trigger pulled as usual with a SA.

    I have a Starr DA that was unfired when I got it in 1943 for $24 at the Far West Hobby Shop in San Francisco. Shot it a few times before it became valuable.

    Been there, done that!
  • GunHawkeGunHawke Member Posts: 576 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    THAT'S IT!!!! THE "SLAB" SIDE IS WHAT CAUGT MY EYE ALONG WITH THE TRIGGER!!

    Thanks....I always get a kick out of new info like this!

    Jim
    GunHawke
  • rhmc24rhmc24 Member Posts: 1,984 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Correction - Got to thinking and pulled out the old Starr DA.

    The hammer cannot be thumb-cocked. It has to be cocked by pulling the trigger as described above. The slider keeps the main trigger from pulling far enough to fire it.
    In the other position, the main trigger fires it as in a DAO (double action only).

    See photo of DA Starr
    http://collectorsfirearms.com/admin/product_details.php?itemID=12831

    The little slider that limits stroke of the trigger to cock it is visible. In the back of the trigger guard is the secondary trigger that is used for single action firing.
  • john carrjohn carr Member Posts: 1,717 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Remington made a Belt Model double action in .36 caliber. I have one. The Remington letter said it was made in 1864. Not militarily marked, but could have been used in the War. Quien Sabe?
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