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303 jungle carbine

dusty123dusty123 Member Posts: 50 ✭✭
edited January 2012 in Ask the Experts
After having a 303 No4 for while i just managed to get a No5. its slightly the lighter/shorter version, named the jungle carbine. Has anyone had zeroing problems with the receiver been cut? what impovment have you guys made? As you seem to have the anything accessory available?
regards Ray

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    dusty123dusty123 Member Posts: 50 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Looked at a lee enfield jungle carbine in 303 british last week but something seems strange. Manufacture year stamped under bolt says 1960 and left side of receiver is stamped " no 5 mk1 . I thought the no 5 was dscontinued in 1947. It has the hollow bolt knob, peep sight,flash supressor, rubber butt pad and sling attaches to side of buttstock trying to decide if it is a fake or real no 5 "jungle carbine"
    It is also pretty accurate
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    armilitearmilite Member Posts: 35,485 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    There was a large lot of them that were brought into the country back in the 1960's.
    I think the company was Golden State Arms that is probably what you have. They were being advertised at the time in the Shotgun News.
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    rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,650 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    You might try checking the flash hider with a magnet. The original Brit ones were steel. The Golden State repos were aluminum, so I've been told.
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    dfletcherdfletcher Member Posts: 8,164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    There was also a company out there about the same time doing the same as Golden State named "Santa Fe Arms". Usually marked somewhere on the gun.
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    rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,650 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by dfletcher
    There was also a company out there about the same time doing the same as Golden State named "Santa Fe Arms". Usually marked somewhere on the gun.


    "Santa Fe Arms", I believe, was a Trade Name used by Golden State on some of the imported rifles they sold.
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    HangfireHangfire Member Posts: 3,010 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Also, Navy Arms, and it's spin-off Gibbs Rifle Co., mucked up countless Enfields.. Any parts that would fit .. They offered unknown variations, as well as made-up Jungle Carbines..
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    heavyironheavyiron Member Posts: 1,421 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hi,

    I have two original No. 5, Mk I rifles - one Shirley made in 1945 and one Fazakerley made in 1944. Many the No. 5's do not have "No5MkI" on the left side of the receiver for whatever reason. Neither of my rifles do. Perhaps the later ones did because they were not under war-time pressure to manufacture and the stamping took time.

    Check the stock socket for the manufacturer and the production year. The usual markings on the stock socket are "M" for BSA Shirley rifles or "F" for Fazakerley followed by a four digit date indicating the year of manufacture.

    They were loosely No. 4 Enfields that were lightened with a heavily milled receiver, bolt, and barrel to reduce weight. "Jungle Rifle" is just a nickname, they were never officially called Jungle Rifles.

    The Gibbs replica was based on an Ishapore 2A and chambered in 7.62 NATO caliber. There have been many replicas over the years made in Canada, United States, Australia, and India. And why not? These rifles are popular, have a devoted following, and there are not many originals available anymore.

    If this rifle has what looks like a bevel on the rear left side of the receiver and also at the chamber end of the receiver(you have to remove some furniture to see the cuts there),a cut almost the length of the bolt body, a cut in front of the bolt handle on the receiver, and a hole drilled in the end of the bolt handle it is an original or at least original parts. These are the lightening cuts milled on the No. 4 receiver to lighten the rifle. The rifle should be .303 caliber which won't be marked on the rifle either. The lightening cuts and caliber are what discern genuine No. 5's. No other rifle had the lightening cuts in the places mentioned above and are very distinctive.

    There should also be a hard rubber butt plate which is supposed to be the recoil pad, and, in actuality, doesn't offer much recoil reduction. The No. 4 magazine is interchangeable with the No. 5.

    The No. 5 went into production in September 1944 and was declared obsolete in July 1947. There were 169,807 rifles made by Fazakerley and 81,329 Shirleys (BSA). This is the rifle famous for the "Wandering Zero". Many of the No. 5's saw extensive service in Asia and India and have heavy wear.

    Also be sure to look at the bore of your rifle. These rifles were used hard and most of them have decades of crude in the bore. It took me days to scrub mine out, but when finished there was still plenty of good rifling.

    Hope this helps.

    Heavyiron

    The lightning cuts on the receiver are visible in the below photograph:

    dcs489130_10.jpg

    Manufacturers marks M 1945 (M is the BSA mark) on the stock socket:

    DCP_0116.jpg

    Photo of the entire rifle:

    DCP_0119.jpg

    PS: Stack - your rifle was made by Fazakerley in 1947. Fazakerley often marked on the left side of the receiver. BSA would mark on the stock socket. Best
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    StackStack Member Posts: 100 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Here is a picture of the markings on the left side of my No5 MK1 "Jungle Carbine".
    IMG_0073.jpg
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    mondmond Member Posts: 6,458
    edited November -1
    It could be a genuine JC 303 you have , some were surplus & recommisioned to india 1960. check as above, for the lightening , trigger guard, barrel, bolt handle etc. is it like this ?

    755547a2.jpg

    f4563377.jpg

    2010f1aa.jpg

    This also has 5 flute rifling ,does 1" @ 150yds & that wanderin zero myth is BS !I found this in the Scotish Highlands, wrapped in wax crud & paper, as new [:)]

    The ishapor was a 7.62 not to get confused with.
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