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CCW?

D@D[email protected] Member Posts: 4,407
edited February 2012 in Ask the Experts
Thinking about getting my CCW and had a few questions. Does it matter what pistol you use for the range test, do I have to carry that one? When/if I get my CCW could I carry one of my brothers pistols seeing how its in his name without any problems? Sorry in advance if these are dumb questions.

Yes I'm in Texas

Comments

  • Old-ColtsOld-Colts Member Posts: 22,423 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    In Texas if you qualify with an automatic/semi-automatic pistol, then your license will be coded for carry with any pistol or revolver. However, if you qualify with a revolver, then your license will be coded for revolver carry only.

    Edit to add: From your profile it would appear that you'd be applying for a Texas CHL, so I'll clarify to state that I'm a current Texas CHL holder and have been for some time. You can qualify with any handgun you want to and in many cases the Instructor will even loan you a handgun for qualifying if you don't have one. The important thing during qualification is that you know how to handle a firearm and can demonstrate acceptable safety and proficiency.

    However, your license will, in fact, be coded to reflect the type of handgun you used during qualification; either Semi-Automatic (SA) or Not Semi-Automatic (NSA); and this will be the basis for the type of handgun that you can legally carry concealed. In the case of NSA the license states "Only handguns that are not semi-automatic". In the case of SA the license states "All handguns, whether semi-automatic or not". I took this off of my current CHL.

    If you can't feel the music; it's only pink noise!

  • kylewkylew Member Posts: 95 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Do not "carry" a side arm that is not yours. If you have to present it things will go from real bad to real more bad. Both you and your brother will spend time in the pokey, and it sounds like you have had some experience with that before.
  • D@D[email protected] Member Posts: 4,407
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by kylew
    Do not "carry" a side arm that is not yours. If you have to present it things will go from real bad to real more bad. Both you and your brother will spend time in the pokey, and it sounds like you have had some experience with that before.


    I don't really know what your tiring to say there fella but I've never been in trouble with the law in anyway shape or form.
  • HerschelHerschel Member Posts: 2,035 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    kylew, I don't understand your comment. It seems to me that a person legally qualified to carry concealed and legally in possession of the gun he is carrying would have no problem. Please explain how things could go from bad to worse if you have to present it. I am assuming present means drawing it and legally using or displaying it. What law would be violated that would cause the carrying person and the legal owner of the firearm to spend time in the pokey? If you are in one of the anti-gun states you may be correct. In my gun friendly state I don't see that there would be a problem.
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,409 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    It varies by state on the requirements on what firearms can or can not be used when qualifying for a CCW.

    In AZ last time I qualified folks were using any thing from .22's to .45's, and everything in between. If you didn't even have a handgun the folks running the class would lend you one. Also there is no requirement for listing the type and serial number of the firearm on the CCW. Once you passed the class and got your CCW, you could carry anything from a .22 Derringer to a Desert Eagle.
  • kylewkylew Member Posts: 95 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Two responses here ... first DD stated that his brothers pistol is "without any problems" I assumed from that that the pistol DD has does have has "problems". I would take that to mean that DD may have had previous brushes with the law and may be a restricted person. He also said "when/if". "If" he can get a CCW also indicates to me that there may be a problem. I admit I may have misinterpreted the actual question.
    Second... If DD were to have to discharge said pistol and it was not his own because he was a restricted person then it will not go well for either of them, DD or his brother for giving a pistol to a restricted person. The same issue applies here with the ammo. If you were to discharge a side arm and you are using reloads then that gives a cause of action for the other party. From here you had better use "new in the box" ammo.
  • D@D[email protected] Member Posts: 4,407
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by kylew
    Two responses here ... first DD stated that his brothers pistol is "without any problems" I assumed from that that the pistol DD has does have has "problems". I would take that to mean that DD may have had previous brushes with the law and may be a restricted person. He also said "when/if". "If" he can get a CCW also indicates to me that there may be a problem. I admit I may have misinterpreted the actual question.
    Second... If DD were to have to discharge said pistol and it was not his own because he was a restricted person then it will not go well for either of them, DD or his brother for giving a pistol to a restricted person. The same issue applies here with the ammo. If you were to discharge a side arm and you are using reloads then that gives a cause of action for the other party. From here you had better use "new in the box" ammo.


    What I meant by when/if is when or if I decide to get my permit not that I'll have any problems legally attaining one. As to the carrying of one of my brother's pistol he has a smaller handgun and would be more comfortable carrying in hot Texas weather. Without any problems meant if I do get stop and have to show my permit & weapon is there going to be any problems/trouble for carrying a pistol in my brother's name.
  • kylewkylew Member Posts: 95 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I am sorry I responded to this post. I will just say this as a general comment.
    If you get into a spot where you must present your side arm and discharge it the following will happen. If you handle yourself correctly your weapon will still be at ready when the leo's show up. In fact it would be better that you call them with your off hand. When they come through the door you need to loudly explain that you are not the bad guy. That the bad guy is on the floor dead. At this point you will be disarmed, thrown to the floor and treated not so nicely. From this point you will be detained and possibly arrested. If they find out the side arm you have is not yours or if you used anything but new ammo then all this gives cause for the family of the dead guy. In almost all cases that family will sue you even if you are not charged by the state or city. You will spend your life savings trying to defend yourself and anything but a "perfect" response will make your defense even harder and could easily result in a loss.
    It's a really bad idea to carry or ultimately discharge either as described above. Both the state and the family will grasp at anything they can to make you look bad and will use any and all small things to break you and your brother.
    Any person who takes on the responsibility of carrying on a regular basis needs to think through all of the possible outcomes. Not only during the action but also the aftermath. Your life will be changed forever no matter what happens.
  • kylewkylew Member Posts: 95 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    One last thing. This advise is worth exactly what you paid for it. $0.00
  • kylewkylew Member Posts: 95 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I'm sorry I can't help myself.
    This is what you face..... if you obtain a CCW . You must assume that some day you will need to act with that weapon. If and when you do, and if you survive these are the resulting facts:
    #1. you will be spending some time in custody of the police.
    #2. when it's over you will have less money than you now have.
    #3. you will be changed from the experience.

    All of this regardless of the outcome. regardless if you discharged or not. regardless if the rounds hit anything or not. Some say you have the right to carry and other say you have the obligation to carry. I happen to agree with the latter. Learn the law and follow it as best as you can. Get Jeff Coopers little book on the principles of self defense and live by them and be wise.
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