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Epoxied Action Screws

TWalkerTWalker Member Posts: 2,372 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited March 2015 in Ask the Experts
I bought a used Tikka T3. All's well except the action screws won't loosen. I'm afraid if I use more pressure I'll break the screws. The scope was fastened the same way, I had to cut off the screw heads to remove the rings. I've had tight screws before but always could get them loose by freezing and/or heating. I think these screws are set for life. Any suggestions appreciated.

Comments

  • CapnMidnightCapnMidnight Member Posts: 8,520
    edited November -1
    There are two tricks I've learned over the years to loosen tight screws, without boogering them. Scope mounting screws, if they have been lock-tightened, heat them with a hair dryer, or a heat gun. Put a damp rag over the stock wood to protect the finish.
    Use a proper fitting plastic handled screw driver and a plastic hammer. Put torque pressure on the screw and swat it with the hammer at the same time. Works like an impact screw driver.
    Money invested in good screw drivers, is money well spent.
    W.D.
  • nononsensenononsense Member, Moderator Posts: 10,319 ******
    edited November -1
    TWalker,

    Control the rifle in a properly padded vise. You can't do this while trying to hold onto the rifle.

    Use a good old-fashioned soldering iron to apply local high heat to the head of the screws. The heat has to be local not broad like a hair dryer. It may take a minute or two to get the temp up to the point where the epoxy is affected.

    Best.
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,351 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Some of the screwdrivers have a square shank (or a hex nut at the handle) so you can use a wrench to apply torque with one hand and pressure into the screw head with the other. Apex brand hex bits (ground to fit slot in screw) in a 1/4 or 3/8 ratchet.

    Slightly or more undersized drill rod, heated to dull red - then held to screw to transfer the heat.

    A small drop of Kroil on each end of the screw every day for a few days to a week.

    Properly fitting screwdriver swatted with a lead hammer to shock the threads.

    Hope that Bubba didn't paint the threads with iodine, or you will be drilling and tapping those chemically welded screws out and often to the next larger size.

    Good secure padded vice or cradle and even a extra pair of hands.
  • MobuckMobuck Member Posts: 11,339 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    "Use a good old-fashioned soldering iron to apply local high heat to the head of the screws. The heat has to be local not broad like a hair dryer. It may take a minute or two to get the temp up to the point where the epoxy is affected."

    ^^^^^^^^^^THAT^^^^^^^^^^^^ has worked for me better than any other solution.
  • navc130navc130 Member Posts: 737 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I cannot emphasize enough to use a snug fitting (width and thickness) screwdriver tip and a right-angle handle to apply torque.
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