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Colt Police Positive

SnigleySnigley Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
edited March 2015 in Ask the Experts
The local pawn shop has recently added 4 Colt Police Positive revolvers to their display case. All show a patent date of July 4, 1905. One in particular is chambered 38 S&W, with a 6" bbl., s/n 866xx. This gun is parkerized. Could that be original? And if so is it rare and how would it effect value. The finish is 95% plus.

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Comments

  • SnigleySnigley Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have a Colt Police Positive .32 Police CTG. with last patent date of October 5, 1926. Serial #339756.

    Can you help with age of gun and what type of cartridge can be safely used in this gun. I have never fired it, and it has been in my gun safe for 20 years.

    Thank you
  • SnigleySnigley Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Guys I recently inherited an old Colt Police Positive in .22 caliber. I noticed that when the hammer is cocked it only rotates the cylinder about 98%. You have to slightly bump the cylinder to get it ot lock onto place. Anyone know a good gunsmith in the Houston area that might be able to repair this? The gun probably has far mor sentimental than collector value, but I want a knowledgable individual to do the work. Thanks!
  • SnigleySnigley Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I stopped in a local gun shop today and was looking at a Colt Police Positive he was selling for a widow. Here's what I recall:

    Serial #1148xx matching on barrel and inside of frame, conservatively 95%+ factory nickel plating, clear markings and rampant colt on left side of frame, factory pearl grips with Colt medallion, 4" barrel, .38 special caliber, mint bore and excellent action. It was carried by her late Police officer husband and looks like it was hardly ever fired. It has his badge number lightly engraved in the bottom of the butt strap.

    These are not my specialty but it's a pretty little gun. Can anyone give me a rough idea as to its value?

    Thanks!
  • SnigleySnigley Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Just before Christmas I came across a CPP , RanchoPaul was so help full on the info I needed.Now cleanin the pistol up I find in the backstrap of the handle these intial: AM RY EXP. Space just as you see it. Any Ideas? Thanks
  • SnigleySnigley Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have a Colt Police Positive, ser. #882767 (on frame, letter "B" under number). It has bluish looking grips, with thumb rest on the left. Colt rampant stallion stamped in right grip (not medallion). On the underside of the barrel are the letters CA1 SI ALB VT. The 1 after CA could be an I. Any information about this would be greatly appreciated.

    TH Gibbs
  • SnigleySnigley Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I JUST CAME ACROSS A COLT P/P SERIAL #125248 a IN 38 cal.IT IS IN VERY GOOD SHAPE JUST BARELY HAS RING ARROUND CYLINDER, IT HAS A BAKEALITE OR PLASTIC LOOKING GRIPS. CAN ANYONE GIVE ME AN APROX YEAR THIS WAS MADE? ANY OTHER INFO WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATED.
    KEITH ([email protected])
  • SnigleySnigley Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have an old colt police positive, i think it is first gen. since the serial is 15xxx.my question is that it has a very small "3" on the frame on the left side right above where the trigger guard meets the frame (rear of cylinder). What does this signify?thanks Scott
  • SnigleySnigley Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I recently aquired a Colt Police Positive .38 and am trying to determine the value:if it's a collectable.The gun is chrome plated, with pearl handled grips.It has a 3in.barrel and is in very good/excellent condition.there is very little wear in the barrel or cylinder.the gun has a serial# of 137xxx and a capital B below the ser#.any help or info will be greatly appreciated.Thanks,
    Horner666
  • SnigleySnigley Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hi everyone: I have a Colt Police Positive 38 Special. Unless I overlooked it, the only number on the gun is A 1540. I checked several websites, in an effort to obtain the year this gun was made, without any success. Can anyone tell me the year this gun was made, or where to find the information? Thanks in advance to any and all who reply.
  • SnigleySnigley Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Came across a 4" CPP looking to find year of manufacter,I am unfamilair with colts ,I know this is a first issue.It does not take 38 specials,but will it take 38 S&W,any info will be appreciated Thanks......



    Don't piss down my back and tell me its rainin
  • SnigleySnigley Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have a Colt Police Positive in 38 special chambering that I have a question about. On the left side of the frame where the Rampant Colt is, there is an extra engraving that I don't know what is. There is an engraving or stamping over the Rampant Colt that looks like a "C", only it is wider than it is tall. Can anyone tell me what this is and if it is something special, or just period for the gun?

    Thanks,
    Jimmy
  • SnigleySnigley Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Gun has 5 in. barrel.Marked on barrel is Colt Police Positive 38. Marked new police under standing horse. Number 5709 marked on swing out. Pat. date 1884 and 1905 on barrel.Gun has very little blue left but no major dings or scratches. What cartridge does this gun take. When was it made. Has no serial number.What is it worth.Thinking of putting it on G.B.
  • SnigleySnigley Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have a Colt Police Positive, first issue, 4" barrel. .38 short.
    I have a blue book but this Colt has been refinished. It has nickel plating. They did a good job. You can read all the print and dates. The Colt on the frame is lite. The only real noticeable piting is on the rear of the cylinder. The overall look is good, real shiny. The grips look real good. They look correct. I dont know if they are original.No wear or chips on the grips. Can anyone give me a dollar estimate of the value of this Colt? Thankyou very much, steve
  • SnigleySnigley Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I was visiting a lady in North Carolina and she showed me this revolver. It's a Police Positive in WRF. The serial # I believe is 32,3XX and the revolver is very tight, the blue's pretty fair and it seems to function O.K.
    She got the gun and holster from her late uncle and knows nothing about it. I'm clueless about Colts, but would like to know the approximate age and value of this one. Also, is the WRF chambering less common? Any information would be appreciated. She's not interested in selling it. Thanks.
    colt%20ploice%20positive.jpg
    colt%20police%20positive%202.jpg
  • jim_lemayjim_lemay Member Posts: 3,074 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Consider cleaning/blowing out the area where hand comes out of frame.

    What you describe is either contamination from 22lr (notoriously dirty caliber) or pistol needs work on timing.

    Check with Collectors Firearms on Fondren in Houston for reference to gunsmith if they won't help. I have bought 2 Colt Police Positives from them recently and other pieces over the last 25 years.
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,272 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    First thing I would do, would be to carefully take the side plate off. Using the proper screwdrivers. Clean out all the accumulated, 70+ year old crud.

    After getting it back together. Test it with snap caps in the chambers. The bolt should lock up into the cylinder, just after the trigger is pulled. Just prior to the hammer impact.

    Timing on the old Colt revolvers. Is a can of worms. If there is, a timing problem. It requires a knowledgeable smith, who is familiar and has replacement parts for these old Colts.





    EDIT #1,

    A gunsmith has a special tool, called a "range rod". That is used to verify proper alignment of the cylinder and barrel.

    This will address your concerns. If the cylinder and barrel are indexed correctly, when the hammer falls. And the cylinder can't be moved because the bolt is secure in the cylinders locking notch. Your good to go.
  • SnigleySnigley Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I had previously removed the side panel and given it a through cleaning, along with the rear of the cylinder (there was 70 years of gunk in it). While I'm not an expert, it appears to me that the pawl that actually rotates the cylinder may be worn. I have no problem sending this across country for a proper repair, I was just hoping there might a qualified individual locally.
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,351 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    http://www.gunpartscorp.com/Manufacturers/Colt-33188/Revolvers-35751/DFrame-37997/PolicePositive-35911.htm?results=All

    Inspect both part #24 hand and #30 ratchet. Also look at the #2 bolt and the bolt notches in the cylinder. The pins screws etc. that these ride in/on is important as the working surfaces.
  • SnigleySnigley Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Part #24 is my primary concern, but it is possible that something is not moving it the necessary distance.
  • nunnnunn Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 34,999 ******
    edited November -1
    OK, so the cylinder falls short of locking upon cocking the hammer. How about when the trigger is pressed? Does it go ahead and lock up before the hammer falls? That feature was one of Colt's big selling points.
  • SnigleySnigley Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Now my wires are really crossed. When the hammer is cocked, it is only a micron from locking. When the trigger is pulled the cylinder does fall into the lock notch, but I can't tell if it's vibration or the cylinder actually turning. Is there anyway to actually tell? I've never actually shot this weapon because I was concerned about safety. I had never heard that this might be a normal condition, but I'd like to be certain before I start pouring the coal to it.
  • SnigleySnigley Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Guys, I'm going to bump this up one last time to see if I can get a clarification on Nunn's comment. How can I tell if the cylinder timing is actually safe and the way it was intended to work?
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,272 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Snigley
    Guys, I'm going to bump this up one last time to see if I can get a clarification on Nunn's comment. How can I tell if the cylinder timing is actually safe and the way it was intended to work?




    Might consider reading with comprehension. The edit I added to my original post. Course if you have problems with your cognition? Might not do any good.[:D]
  • dfletcherdfletcher Member Posts: 8,057 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Snigley
    Now my wires are really crossed. When the hammer is cocked, it is only a micron from locking. When the trigger is pulled the cylinder does fall into the lock notch, but I can't tell if it's vibration or the cylinder actually turning. Is there anyway to actually tell? I've never actually shot this weapon because I was concerned about safety. I had never heard that this might be a normal condition, but I'd like to be certain before I start pouring the coal to it.


    The Colt uses a two stage hand. The 1st (top) gets the cylinder moving and the 2nd stage (lower) pushes it to full locking, moving & holding the cylinder in place as the trigger is pressed. Note the hand is on the trigger, that final press up moves it into position. You can also probably get it into position by thumb cocking all the way to the rear - the hammer will "lift" the trigger just enough to make the distance.

    Fitting a Colt hand is more difficult than a Smith & Wesson. Further, Colt parts have a higher degree of interdependence than Smiths, Rugers, etc. And a new hand may move the cylinder too soon, before the cylinder bolt drops, causing hesitation and will be felt via the trigger.

    With a tight action the cylinder bolt will drop into place on a slow thumb cocking of the hammer, you'll feel a slight "rub" on the hammer if you then slowly lower it with your thumb. That means the SA sear notch is releasing just as the 2nd stage of the hand "locks" the cylinder in place. Most Colts have some kind of wear

    It sounds like your hand is just a touch tired, not by much, and should be perfectly safe to shoot. On occasion slight peening of the 2nd stage of the hand gives just enough lift to make the cylinder cut. But keep in mind the only difference between "whacking it with a hammer" and "peening" is the ability of the person wielding the hammer - it's basically the same thing, with (unfortunately) differing result.

    Since you've already removed the sideplate once it may be interesting to remove it again, then put the cylinder back in place. If you slowly, in a controlled manner thumb cock the hammer with the sideplate off you'll easily see the hand's interaction with the cylinder ratchet. Just be sure to hold the hand in place as it rides on the corner of the frame opening. It has a tendency to work out. If it does just lift the rebound lever a bit and reseat the hand stem.
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