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Value of Ruger single shot 100 year commerative?

lololand11lololand11 Member Posts: 34 ✭✭
edited October 2007 in Ask the Experts
Love the gun. Simple engraving with the 30.06. 500 made. I have never collected before. Do you think this might make a good beginning for a collection?

Comments

  • duckhunterduckhunter Member Posts: 7,615 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Great gun. Do not expect it to increase in value. Just because only 500 made does not mean it will become a collectable. Buy the gun to enjoy.
  • lololand11lololand11 Member Posts: 34 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by duckhunter
    Great gun. Do not expect it to increase in value. Just because only 500 made does not mean it will become a collectable. Buy the gun to enjoy.


    Any suggestions on a direction to go? All I can afford is about $1,500.00 per year. I got the almost identical cooments on this gun as you on the Ruger Forum. I really like Ruger but maybe that's not the way to go. Do you happen to know a source out there that gives the beginner collector a "blueprint" on how to get started? I grew up with utility guns such as the Rem 1100 that are all good shooters but I'm not going to even pretend they have collectable value.

    Thanks for the input!
  • lololand11lololand11 Member Posts: 34 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by lololand11
    quote:Originally posted by duckhunter
    Great gun. Do not expect it to increase in value. Just because only 500 made does not mean it will become a collectable. Buy the gun to enjoy.


    Any suggestions on a direction to go? All I can afford is about $1,500.00 per year. I got the almost identical cooments on this gun as you on the Ruger Forum. I really like Ruger but maybe that's not the way to go. Do you happen to know a source out there that gives the beginner collector a "blueprint" on how to get started? I grew up with utility guns such as the Rem 1100 that are all good shooters but I'm not going to even pretend they have collectable value.

    Thanks for the input!


    Oh, I guess I should have noted that my collection would be geared for long term appreciation versus personal or sentimental value although that would be icing on the cake.
  • SCOUT5SCOUT5 Member Posts: 14,701 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If you want to collect for long term investment and appreciation firearm collecting is like every thing else. You can speculate on what is or what isn't going to be a wanted collectible in the years to come or you can invest in what is already a wanted collectible. When you buy new on speculation the product usully drops in value as soon as you leave the shop. To ever be worth more than your investment it must first over come this initial drop and then surpass it. All firearms do this eventually, in somewhere around 10-20 years. Rarely will you find that really good one that will make up for the other average ones. In my opinion you are better off in the stock market, though I admit it isn't near as much fun.

    There is a much better time tested approach. Buy what has already become a solid collectable, not a hot fad collectible. These item continue to increase in value and are always worth what you gave for them or more, provided of course that you bought well to start with. Buying well just means not giving more than the item is actually worth. Everyone loves to run accross that special bargian, fine if you can find them. There is nothing wrong with giving what a truely collectable item is worth, just don't give more. Doing this just requires a little simple research. For example, for $1500 dollars, if you shop wisely you could buy 3 collectible Savage 99 rifles or 2 of the rarer ones or maybe only one of the very first model 250-3000 in great condition and have a little left over. In 5 years they will be worth more than you gave for them, provided you don't over pay. There are lots of collectable firearms just research the matter.

    You could but your $1500 dollars a year in a money market account until you save enough to invest in some of the old collectible double barrels. Buy well and they also will make you money.

    Any used gun bought at fair value should increase in value even the utility guns you speak of. Buying new on speculation is risky from a financial stand point. That being said there are occasionaly offerings that will make money when bought new. Figuring out which ones is more effort than I would want to invest.

    Best wishes............Scout
  • hslaterprycehslaterpryce Member Posts: 927 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    In my 40+ years of buying, trading, selling and enjoying guns one thing has always been clear. Buy what you like, what you personally like. Get to know that brand, caliber, type as best you can. If you "like" them this part will be easier. Do research, ask questions, visit gun shops and pawn shops when you travel to get an idea of what drives the business geographically. But I always say go back to what YOU like. Investing in guns, or any manufactured product, is dicey at best. But buying and enjoying that commodity because you like it - that is priceless and yes, over time, your selections will appreciate in value. Just some more than others. There are no guarantees but you can have fun! Just my humble opinion...[^]
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