In order to participate in the GunBroker Member forums, you must be logged in with your GunBroker.com account. Click the sign-in button at the top right of the forums page to get connected.

Rifle Stock Float it or leave it alone

bvshooterbvshooter Member Posts: 136 ✭✭
edited May 2017 in Ask the Experts
I just acquired a mint, unfired, 1981 Ruger 77 in 257 Roberts,tang safety, red pad. I quit hunting over 20 years ago but now will again on a limited basis, mainly shooting feral hogs. I always free floated all my barrels before,as I hand loaded,and wanted the best accuracy. I really hate to sand the channel of this mint rifle's stock, so is it really an advantage to float, or should I leave it be? The stock should be well cured as it is 36 years old.I have not fired it yet and will be using factory loads. Thanks for any opinions.

Comments

  • navc130navc130 Member Posts: 970 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If it shoots well (or well enough), then let it be. You can always shim-up the action and chamber area to create a free floating barrel.
  • PA ShootistPA Shootist Member Posts: 669 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Old saying, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it". I would guess that its accuracy is fully up to any needs for hunting feral hogs, whitetail deer in the woods, etc. Sometimes a forearm bedded with a bit of upward pressure makes for very accurate shooting. Try shooting before thinking, and remember "Minute of Feral Hog" at the ranges you shoot them is all you need.
  • bvshooterbvshooter Member Posts: 136 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by navc130
    If it shoots well (or well enough), then let it be. You can always shim-up the action and chamber area to create a free floating barrel.
    Thanks. I did a shim experiment and it floated it as far back to where the barrel gets larger and I would have to sand the channel out in that area. Otherwise, the way it is now, the barrel fits perfectly, almost as if it were a full glassed channel.
  • Horse Plains DrifterHorse Plains Drifter Member, Moderator, Sr. Moderator Posts: 37,619 ***** Sr. Moderator
    edited November -1
    Give it the dollar bill test. If a dollar will slide I'd leave 'er alone. FYI I have had a couple Rugers that pressed hard on the bottom of the barrel in the front inch of fore end. If it needs cleaning, I'd clean it. No sense in having a "mint unfired rifle" that does not shoot good IMO. Especially if you're going to take an unfired rifle and fire, and hunt with it.
  • bvshooterbvshooter Member Posts: 136 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by PA Shootist
    Old saying, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it". I would guess that its accuracy is fully up to any needs for hunting feral hogs, whitetail deer in the woods, etc. Sometimes a forearm bedded with a bit of upward pressure makes for very accurate shooting. Try shooting before thinking, and remember "Minute of Feral Hog" at the ranges you shoot them is all you need.
    Thanks. My shots will be 115 yards at the most and I will shoot it before doing anything. Apparently the factory would not install the lug at the front of the stock otherwise. Best regards
  • beantownshootahbeantownshootah Member Posts: 12,776 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by navc130
    If it shoots well (or well enough), then let it be. You can always shim-up the action and chamber area to create a free floating barrel.


    This.

    First see how well the thing shoots.

    Only if its not as accurate *as you need it to be* should you start worrying about floating/shimming/bedding, etc.

    I'll guess that the stock gun, as it is, is probably perfectly accurate enough to down hogs at <150 yards.
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,348 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    It will used and not mint soon enough. Do what it takes to get it to shoot good enough for you and your ammo. I make sure all the wood is sealed like the mag well and under the pad etc.

    I like about 5# of up pressure at the end of the stock to help dampen oscillations.

    Good copper solvent like Shooter's Choice and JB bore Paste would be on my list during breakin.

    added I would, could have dust and old dried oil in the there. Polishing will help to smooth the initial roughness let from the manufacturing process.
  • bvshooterbvshooter Member Posts: 136 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by beantownshootah
    quote:Originally posted by navc130
    If it shoots well (or well enough), then let it be. You can always shim-up the action and chamber area to create a free floating barrel.

    Just mounted the scope and bore sighted. Now waiting on ammo to come in
    This.

    First see how well the thing shoots.

    Only if its not as accurate *as you need it to be* should you start worrying about floating/shimming/bedding, etc.

    I'll guess that the stock gun, as it is, is probably perfectly accurate enough to down hogs at <150 yards.
  • bvshooterbvshooter Member Posts: 136 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by charliemeyer007
    It will used and not mint soon enough. Do what it takes to get it to shoot good enough for you and your ammo. I make sure all the wood is sealed like the mag well and under the pad etc.

    I like about 5# of up pressure at the end of the stock to help dampen oscillations.

    Good copper solvent like Shooter's Choice and JB bore Paste would be on my list during breakin.
    Saying clean the bore first before firing ?
  • nononsensenononsense Member Posts: 10,935 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    bvshooter,

    Please do not take offense, I'm just trying to help.

    quote:I just acquired a mint, unfired, 1981 Ruger 77...
    quote:I really hate to sand the channel of this mint rifle's stock
    quote:will be using factory loads
    quote:Saying clean the bore first before firing ?

    I pulled these phrases out to simplify the questions.

    It's a Ruger. There are more important problems with these rifles than whether or not to 'float' a barrel. The angled action screw will destroy more accuracy than free floating the barrel. Bedding this screw is a nuisance and often doesn't solve the problem as anticipated. It's probably a hammer forged barrel which cost Ruger all of about $7.00 when it was manufactured. These barrels had more problems than free floating will ever cure. The one upside to this model is that the trigger can be tuned a little to be much better than the original from the factory.

    It may be mint/unfired right now but your intent is to fire it so this has no bearing on the condition at all.

    If you're intent upon using factory loads your limits will be those factory loads which are usually notorious for being produced cheaply no matter what price is charged by the manufacturer.

    Always clean the bore first before doing any shooting. But...

    quote:
    Good copper solvent like Shooter's Choice and JB bore Paste would be on my list during breakin.

    If you read the poster's comment completely you'll see that he meant to clean during the break in session.

    Best.
Sign In or Register to comment.