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Winchester 300 mag

wishponywishpony Member Posts: 5 ✭✭
edited March 2009 in Ask the Experts
My husband found this gun in his father's collection. All he can see on the outside of it is 300 win mag and the stamp on barrel is 6811. We were wanting to know how else we can find out more information on it.[?]

Comments

  • Wehrmacht_45Wehrmacht_45 Member Posts: 3,377
    edited November -1
    Post pics of it on here.
  • MIKE WISKEYMIKE WISKEY Member, Moderator Posts: 9,750 ******
    edited November -1
    if that's ALL there is on the rifle it's probably a custom rebuild. Pictures would help a lot. see the 'sticky' at the top of this form for picture posting instructions.
  • nononsensenononsense Member Posts: 10,934 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    wishpony,

    Welcome to the Gunbroker Forums!

    "All he can see on the outside of it is 300 win mag and the stamp on barrel is 6811."

    That's unusual for the most part since most if not all manufacturers have their name on a firearm somewhere. There are a couple of exceptions such as refinished military rifles that have been 'scrubbed' to remove the identity by sanding and grinding.

    I can suggest a couple of things to start with:

    - Use strong, direct light to see any markings that have been worn or sanded away. Sunlight is great. Try a magnifying glass or strong readers to see smaller marks.

    - Remove the scope and bases if there are any on the rifle. That way you can see what was under them.

    - Take the barreled action out of the stock and look at the bottom and underside of both the barrel and action. There could be maker's marks there or other information we can use to assist with getting you more information.

    - We really need good sharp photographs of the action top, sides and bottom. Sharp overalls will help also.

    Best.
  • wishponywishpony Member Posts: 5 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Okay, haven't gotten the pictures yet of it. But on the bolt is the mark of L with a 2 circled. He pulled the bolt. I have been trying to find instructions for him to disassemble the gun so he can clean it. It doesn't have a scope but is set up to put a scope on it. It has no front sites. Does that help any?
  • MIKE WISKEYMIKE WISKEY Member, Moderator Posts: 9,750 ******
    edited November -1
    "Does that help any? ".............nope we still need the pix's, this is just an example of a customized mauser, the letters/numbers you gave use don't tell us much
    8mmai.jpg
    from your pictures, we can see that you have a commercial m-98 mauser with a f/n action, possibly put together by sako ( they used f/n actions into the early 1950'2).
  • wishponywishpony Member Posts: 5 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have pictures on my hard drive...how do I post them here?
  • yearofspideryearofspider Member Posts: 1,657 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by wishpony
    I have pictures on my hard drive...how do I post them here?


    Open this link and then follow the instructions: http://forums.gunbroker.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=259294
  • wishponywishpony Member Posts: 5 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    SDC10124.jpg
    SDC10125.jpg
    SDC10128.jpg
    SDC10131.jpg
    SDC10134.jpg

    Bolt action 300 Mag Winchester under the barrel is stamped Belgium and the trigger mechanism is made in Finland. There are two stamps on the bottom of the barrel...L and a small 2 with a circle on it.
  • ern98ern98 Member Posts: 1,725 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Fn of Belgium barrel from the look/sound of it and the pic of the bolt looks like what I'd expect a FN bolt should look like so hopefully the action is too. Pics of the rear of the action, where the bolt closes, would help id what sort. There are both commerical and military Mausers that could have been used. Also take some pics of the stock so we can see the overall shape (several angles please) and close ups of the checkering (if any), forstock tip, recoil pad or plate and grip cap. There were all kinds of commercial FN Mausers imported under one name or another, but there would be a name. Tens of thousands of custom and semi custom Mauser conversions have been made over the years on both commercial and military actions and the quality of the stock will be key in identifing what grade it is. Putting a value to custom rifles with no provanonce(sp) is tricky as you can't say who built, for who, when or anything else about it, it just is. So lots more photos please.....
  • nononsensenononsense Member Posts: 10,934 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    wishpony,

    One of the clues that we can actually use is that the trigger is Made in Finland. That can indicate this rifle was made by Sako in the late 40's, early 50's while they were trying to develop their own designs for bolt action rifles.

    "A rifle that was the first long action Sako imported into the U.S. after WWII; the Sako High Power Mauser Sporting Rifle, with Fabrique Nationale action. Importation began in the early 1950s and most sources say it ended around 1957."

    "This rifle was built around the world famous F.N. Mauser 98 type action barreled and stocked by Sako. Calibers imported into the U.S. were two great classics, the .270 Winchester and 30-06 Springfield. There are likely other calibers that have made their way across the pond in the more common European calibers like 9.3x62 and such, but these would be rare."

    sakofnmauser2.jpg

    sakofnmauser.jpg

    I will suggest again that you should remove the scope mount bases from the action so that you can see and photograph the information on the front ring.

    Please don't take this wrong but your photos leave something to be desired insofar as what we can see in them. Blurry, out of focus photographs don't let us see the detail(s) that we need to help solve your questions. Please read your manual and find the subject of taking 'macro' photos. Then try to use a tripod or some sort of support to help with the longer exposures.

    We lock these topics at 10 replies so please start a new thread with the new photographs and let's see where we can go from there.

    Best.
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