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Revolver question

bigoutsidebigoutside Member Posts: 19,443
edited March 2016 in Ask the Experts
I have the opportunity to replace a 4 inch security six (my first firearm, that I wish I'd never sold).

Of course, my friend has a used one. New Old Stock would be nice. But that's not where we are. [;)]

Problem is, it's been 30 years since I've spent any time with a revolver.

How much wiggle is acceptable in the cylinder?

The one he's offering g certainly isn't bank vault tight. And I don't expect it to be.

But what is serviceable? And what should I pass on?

Answers:
I checked for "wiggle" by cocking hammer, pulling trigger and lowering hammer with my thumb. Then seeing if I could move the cylinder fore and aft or rotationally.

Fore and aft seemed reasonable. But rotationally is a tic more than I remember.

It appears that everything is lining up when it is supposed to (with my squinty eye and a really bright flashlight.

The cylinder stop is engaging appropriately. But once engaged, it will wiggle in its slot in the cylinder frame if I try to rotate the cylinder by hand while locked.

And that's the bear. How much is too much? The stop looks pretty worn.

I have never heard of the paper bag test. I'll certainly give that a whirl and see what I can see.




The crane appears to be fine. Bore looks great. No forcing cone issues that I can see without dye and a lamp.


Ordered a $8 part with $4 shipping. [;)]

I'll try that drag test too! Thanks all for your input so far!!

Comments

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    p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    Any revovler that has the cylinder rotating counter clockwise is going to have some play in it. Bad engineering.

    Stainless steel Ruger. Probably okay.
    As long as the cyliner is linear with the barrel, doesn't shave lead, and timed within eyeball acceptance, give it a whirl on the condition you can return it if you don't like it.
    Reasonable time after any hold up is okay.
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    charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 6,579 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have seen new in the box stuff I wouldn't own that were made by all the big name folks. I would never buy a firearm sight unseen unless I could send it back without cost or it was such a good deal I could afford to get it fixed and still be money ahead.

    Wheel guns need to have some "slop" to work. Besides the cylinder play side to side there is end shake and the barrel to cylinder gap to be considered. Next is crane alignment, people that slam the cylinder closed by snapping their wrist should be regulated to just throwing rocks. Last consideration is the chambers' roundness and consistent throat diameter.

    I like the paper bag test for wheel guns to see if they are a lead spitter. Large brown paper grocery sack with most of the bottom cut out. Hold pistol in the sack low side of dead center. Fire all the chambers. Inspect the sack for punctures.

    Ruger's are heavy duty boat anchors. It is likely fine unless it was abused.
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    yoshmysteryoshmyster Member Posts: 21,342 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Buy it. Shoot it. Send it to Ruger for fix [:D].
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    nmyersnmyers Member Posts: 16,881 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Big, how do you check for "wiggle"?

    Neal
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    62fuelie62fuelie Member Posts: 1,069 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    When you do the "bag test" fire the shots double action, some revolvers will lock-up just fine on single action shots, but may be slightly out of time on the DA shots. Another function test to try is with an EMPTY gun; very slowly pull the trigger while looking at the cylinder bolt (the little stud the pops up in the bottom of the cylinder "window" and engages the locking notches on the cylinder) this should pop up and lock the cylinder just before the hammer drops. Next try to move the cylinder in its rotation - either clockwise or counter-clockwise after the triger has been pulled completely through its stroke and while you are still holding it back in the fully pulled position. If it moves there, you aren't getting full lock-up at the moment of ignition and will surely shave lead.
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    SP45SP45 Member Posts: 1,758 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The wiggle you are concerned with is when the cylinder stop is engaged. After checking the "timing" as described above you can use a rod (the diameter of the lands +- .0005) and drop it down the muzzle on each cylinder chamber with the cylinder stop engages and it should pass into each cylinder chamber with no resistance. This will show that each chamber is properly aligned with the bore. The barrel forcing cone does the rest. Ron Power may make an oversize cylinder stop that has to be fitted if that is necessary. I know they make them for S&W
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    iceracerxiceracerx Member Posts: 8,860 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Another 'test' (taught to me by a revolver smith) is to hold the revolver with the muzzle pointed up (unloaded of course), apply 'drag' to the cylinder with your weak hand, slowly pull the trigger through double action and see if the cylinder 'locks up' before the hammer drops. It should if the timing is OK.
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    bigoutsidebigoutside Member Posts: 19,443
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by SP45
    The wiggle you are concerned with is when the cylinder stop is engaged. After checking the "timing" as described above you can use a rod (the diameter of the lands +- .0005) and drop it down the muzzle on each cylinder chamber with the cylinder stop engages and it should pass into each cylinder chamber with no resistance. This will show that each chamber is properly aligned with the bore. The barrel forcing cone does the rest. Ron Power may make an oversize cylinder stop that has to be fitted if that is necessary. I know they make them for S&W


    Poorly fitted stop appears to be the problem.
    Thanks to each of you for all your help!!!

    A little time and filing, and I should be good.
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