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Storing guns

dodge69dodge69 Member Posts: 954 ✭✭
edited September 2016 in Ask the Experts
What is a good product for storing my guns to keep them from rusting? I have heated safes and I keep them in protective socks in the safe. I wipe them down with Rem Oil cloth every now and then and every time after they are handled. One guy told me about a product called armadillo but that must not have worked out as it is no longer available.
I just wondered if it really is a good idea to put a gun oil that prevents rust is the right way to go as the blue is rust and over time would it attack the blue on a gun.

Comments

  • dodge69dodge69 Member Posts: 954 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I was just wondering if bolt action rifles should be stored in the fired position. Does it harm the spring to leave it cocked?
  • truthfultruthful Member Posts: 1,706 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    A crystalline wax is far superior to any oil providing better protection and is much longer lasting. It hardens quickly, does not run or get absorbed by wood or leather. In fact, we wax the entire gun. We use Renaissance wax which is the same thing many museums use, including the British Museum, to protect all kinds of valuable items. I believe it is available from Brownell's.
  • Bill DeShivsBill DeShivs Member Posts: 1,264 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Wax is not good for long term protection.
    Renaissance Wax is meant to protect items that are not handled. It is designed to be easy to apply and easy to buff off.
    Oil certainly won't attack bluing! All oil does is prevent oxygen and moisture from getting to the steel.
  • dodge69dodge69 Member Posts: 954 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have a few Like NIB's, never been fired guns but the rest of them can and will be shot. I do not buy a gun that could not be shot or one that I can not have ammo made for or can not buy ammo for with the exception of a commemorative which I purchased early on in my collection. I do like to show them off to my friends so all of them do get handled from time to time.
  • slumlord44slumlord44 Member Posts: 3,702 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Are your guns rusting now? If not there is nothing wrong with what you are doing now. Used to do what you are doing. Been using Renaissance Wax for several years with no problems. Still go over them at least once a year to be sure.
  • dodge69dodge69 Member Posts: 954 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I go through a schedule of about three months with all my guns and from time to time I have just a little rust film on a few of them. I have good safes and have a heating rod in each one. I try not to leave them open other than to get the gun I want. I normally use the Rem wipes and wear cotton gloves.
    I had never heard of using a wax on a gun before. I use Amish Wood Milk on the stocks.
  • perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    Ballistol IS a great product for all metals wood and leather Non toxic
  • RadarRadar Member Posts: 2,306 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Break Free Collector.
  • nmyersnmyers Member Posts: 16,793 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    "A little rust film" indicates a serious problem. I suspect changes in ambient temperature & humidity in the room containing your safes. I would also consider changing from a heater (you mean Goldenrod?) to a can of dessicant, refreshing it frequently.

    The curators at the Springfield Armory National Museum put wax on the metal of guns only for long term storage & non-use. They have also said gun wood doesn't need oil or wax, ever.

    Neal
  • dodge69dodge69 Member Posts: 954 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    The ambient temperature stays nearly the same in my gun room. And yes I use the goldenrod, One thing I do not have is a in the safe gauges for the temp and humidity. I just ordered a set of those. The Nibs and guns that have fancy wood or some special option are all in one safe and that is the one I am a little more concerned with as I do not handle them very much.
    I am a bit surprised to hear wood does not need oil or wax. I have seen guns with dry cracks and some of the old ones that the wood has had some shrinkage. Of course these guns more than likely never seen the inside of a safe.
  • 45er45er Member Posts: 245 ✭✭
    edited November -1
  • marlinman93marlinman93 Member Posts: 23 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I use plain old Minn Wax paste on both metal and wood. Have done so for many decades, and never seen any signs of rust, or harm to my old firearms.
    Since I also USE my old guns for shooting, and hunting, it also protects them when out in the elements. If I encounter rain, the moisture simply beads up and runs off both wood and metal.
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