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Semi auto slide stop/release

gundummygundummy Member Posts: 281 ✭✭✭
edited April 2002 in Ask the Experts
This is a topic that was started from another so lets try not to stray again. Should one use the slide catch lever to release the slide to chamber a round, or should one pull back on slide and let it snap back forward to chamber a round? To clarify, we are talking about a loaded mag here and not an empty one.

This will draw mix responses, but for me, I use both methods. I normally go to the range every week and fire 300 to 500 rounds thru my P220 since it's my carry gun. There's a lot of responsibility with carrying a gun, so I take practice very seriously. When practicing for a shoot out, I will use the lever only to release slide when changing mags. There would be no time for pulling slide back, even if it's only a split second. When I am practicing for accuracy, I will pull slide back (relieving catch lever from slide) then release to let slide slam forward to chamber a round. This minimizes wear between slide catch lever and slide. Pulling slide back IS NOT necessary, but I choose to do it. I pull back all of my semi auto slides on all of my non carry guns simply for that reason.

Some people think that you can't have wear by releasing slide with lever only. That cannot be true. I've replaced a couple of slide stops already because previous owners chose to use lever as the only method of release. IMHO, both methods are acceptable, but use of lever only WILL have more wear.

I've been into guns for only a couple of years now and have shot thousands of rounds, but I am no expert. The above is only my opinion based on my very short experience with firearms, so any objections is welcomed if I need to be corrected by the REAL experts. Thanks, GD

Comments

  • William81William81 Member Posts: 20,756 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I always pull the slide back and then release it. That was the way I was taught. I was told just pushing the stop down could cause enough drag on the slide to keep it from going into battery.

    Interesting question...
  • JudgeColtJudgeColt Member Posts: 1,802 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I disagree with William81. Releasing the slide with the slide stop will not cause drag on the slide. The slide will be totally free when the stop is pushed down far enough to release the slide.

    On the other hand, pulling back the slide to release the slide stop, if done correctly, gains a tiny bit of slide travel, which may slightly increase the slide velocity and slightly increase the likelyhood that the round will be fully chambered. The danger with that method is that some may tend to "ride" the slide closed a bit, and thereby be counterproductive in the search for a more forecful slide closing.
  • BayouCritterBayouCritter Member Posts: 76 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I was told at Glock Armorer school either method was acceptable on a Glock.
  • CS8161CS8161 Member Posts: 15,419 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I was told by a police dept Glock armorer not to use the slide stop as a release, but instead to pull back on the slide slightly and then let it go into battery. I guess there is no right answer for this question, so whatever is comfortable for the individual shooter and works best for them, is the way to do it.

    Chris8161
    Admit nothing, deny everything, demand proof!
  • cliffdropover1cliffdropover1 Member Posts: 136 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Either method is acceptable. Reread JudgeColt, he is correct. If one is not supposed to use the slide stop, then why is it there???
  • William81William81 Member Posts: 20,756 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hey I never said the guy that I learned from was correct. He was a thirty year vet. in the Marines, did a couple tours in Viet Nam, retired a full bird Col. and has been a avid shooter all his life.

    He's the guy that taught me to shoot pistols almost 30 years ago. Right wrong or whatever, I will continue to handle my firearms the way he taught me....Heck I have been doing it that way for so long, even if it was wrong, I am not sure I could retrain myself this late in the game.

    On the flip side, I think the Judge is right, there should not be any friction once the stop is released...To each his own I guess....
  • BayouCritterBayouCritter Member Posts: 76 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    There is a third method of releasing a locked slide on a Glock, but it is not used as a law enforcement tactic since odds are greater that a round may not be chambered and therefore rarely acknowledged as a method of release. If the gun is held at a certain angle and a full magazine is quickly loaded, the slide will release automatically.

    Per my agencies policy for the reasons giving by JudgeColt, I instruct my officers to pull back and quickly release the slide.
  • gundummygundummy Member Posts: 281 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Judge, I agree that people do ride the slide when they pull it back to release, thus possibly not chamering a round completely. Alot of newbies at the range do that and I try to correct it right away if I can. They seem to think that it will hurt the gun. I also agree that there is little or no friction once lever is depressed. The wear I was talking about is where the stop and the slide lock up, no where else.

    And Cliff, I think the stop is there to hold the slide open (to stop the slide from going forward). All the different gun manuals I have either calls this lever a "slide catch lever" or a "slide stop". None of the ones I have actually calls it a "slide release". My Sig manual actually says you can use lever to release slide or pull back slightly then release, so either way is acceptable to Sig. Sounds like it really does not matter and is a personal preference. Keep it coming, however, some of the reasonings are very interesting. GD
  • cliffdropover1cliffdropover1 Member Posts: 136 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Yes the "slide stop" is used to hold the slide open. But all of these also have as a part of the "stop" a lever, button, etc. that when pushed is used to release the slide. If the manufacturers didn't want you to use it as such, it wouldn't be made this way. Anyway, either method of releasing the slide is acceptable.
  • binderbinder Member Posts: 242 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    When there are citizens around you and you have to fire your weapon, the way to close the chamber is the way YOU feel is the SAFEST.
    Ultimately if you shoot, or fire your weapon and hurt an unintended
    target, you are the one responsible. Find the way that works best for you and practice it on the range so if the gun accidentally discharges no one gets hurt.
  • JudgeColtJudgeColt Member Posts: 1,802 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I still disagree with gundummy that the slide stop causes drag on the slide. If the slide stop is pushed down to release the slide, it ceases to be in contact with the slide at all. True, it will have friction until it clears the notch, but then there is no contact, unless you can let up on the release before the slide goes all the way forward. I am not sure my reaction time is that fast, and I would see no reason to try to do it.

    As far as the "slide stop" not being a "slide release," the brakes on a car are not identified as "car release" either, but, to let the car go forward (or backward), they are released. The purpose of the slide stop is to release the slide when desired. If it were not so, all guns would be like a PPK or other guns with no external slide stop release.

    Edited by - JudgeColt on 05/01/2002 13:33:06
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