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Natural point of aim

SixStringerSixStringer Member Posts: 131 ✭✭✭
edited May 2002 in Ask the Experts
Tell me about this idea. Why is it important, how is it practiced, how do you know you are doing it right, etc.

Comments

  • SixStringerSixStringer Member Posts: 131 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
  • leeblackmanleeblackman Member Posts: 5,683
    edited November -1
    Never really heard this term, where did you hear about it. I know that I, and most people will naturally aim at the largest part of the target because subconciously they think it will be the easiest to hit, which of coarse if probably is. Thats why I will usually aim center mass of a silouette.

    There is something called sight picture thats pretty important, like looking thru you back sights, at your front sight, with the target out of focus, but you front sight on the target, and taking a freeze from of that.

    I've been trying to train myself to properly draw, not straigh up, but starting from the holster on the tartget, and keeping the gun on the target while I bring it up.

    Sometimes I'l stand right infront of the target, and pretend that its an aggressor and shoot straight from the holster (not in the hoslter).
    Then I'll step about a foot back and do a hip shot, then I'll be 3 yards back and point shoot, and then at 7 yards back I'm just looking at the front sight and putting it under where I want to shoot, then at 9 yards back I use my proper sight picture. This way my subconcious will know where to shoot from according to how far away the taget is.

    If you've ever tried to shoot at a target that comes straigt at you while your stationary, you'd know how hard it is to aim.

    Visit me http://www.geocities.com/gunsmithlee
  • TorinoTorino Member Posts: 27 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    When shooting Service Rifle matches natural point of aim is where your sight picture is not forced or held. Example shooting from the prone position, align your sights on target, take a couple of breaths and close your eyes, when you open them are you still on target if not you shift you body alittle and go though the process again until you get the proper sight picture. A couple breaths release alittle and hold squeeze the trigger while maintaining sight picture.
  • badboybobbadboybob Member Posts: 1,658 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I too have never heard the term. IMO point of aim begins with gun selection. You need a gun that fits your hand so that when you point at a target the sights are naturally aligned. If a gun points high or low it doesn't fit your hand and is a poor defense choice. Once you've chosen the right gun you need to practice aquiring the target, just raise the gun and check your point of aim. After much practice target acquisition is automatic. For defensive shooting I focus on the target, not the front sights. That way I see one target and what the target is doing.
    Those of you who have been to Front Sight most probably can provide a better answer.

    PC=BS
  • Shootist3006Shootist3006 Member Posts: 4,171
    edited November -1
    Much as torino said, natural point of aim (POA) may be defined as body to target alignment so that when your firearm is presented (brought up and aimed) it is on target without any additional effort. The way to check this is close your eyes and raise the gun to the firing position, open your eyes and take a sight picture. If you are on target, it is your natural POA, if not - adjust your feet/body position until you are on target. Attempting to shoot at other than your natural POA causes additional strain and effort. This is more of a factor in bull's-eye or silhouette matches where muscular fatigue can be a major factor.

    In action pistol sports and skeet it is helpful to establish a natural POA for the 1st target as it allows for faster target acquisition. It can be an important technique but not in the same class as sight alignment, trigger squeeze focusing on the front sight or breath control.


    Quod principi placuit legis habet vigorem.Semper Fidelis
  • 96harley96harley Member Posts: 4,228
    edited November -1
    last post said it quite well. Close eyes while in any of the postions:
    seated, standing, prone, kneeling, or bench. Without firearm in hand,
    take a position as if holding a firearm. Make believe you are taking aim. Assist shooter by moving them around until they are in vicinity of target. This should be the most comfortable position for the shooter to be in.
  • BayouCritterBayouCritter Member Posts: 76 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I stress point shooting to my officers. As Shootist indicated a quick 1st target acquisition is very important in a real shooting situation. As previously indicated an experienced officer should be able to close his eyes, draw and hit center mass every shot at close ranges. When dealing with inexperienced shooters we use the following drill from the five yard line starting out dry firing. Draw, carefully aim, click (once), holster - repeating until they get a good steady draw. Next we have them load up, draw, carefully aim, fire (once) and holster. As they progress we go to quick aim and eventually take the aim out forcing them to draw and fire fast. By this time they should have developed a feel for this position to where they are on target every time they draw to fire from this range. This is also effective as you move further away from your target in that as you draw using this method you automatically bring the pistol on target, thus gaining a quicker sight alignment/picture.
  • leeblackmanleeblackman Member Posts: 5,683
    edited November -1
    Bayou Critter, what schools have you attended?

    Visit me http://www.geocities.com/gunsmithlee
  • DaRoostaDaRoosta Member Posts: 270 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    All good information above. Everyone is basically speaking of the same concept except with different scenarios. Natural point of aim can even come into play off a bench rest. Have you ever put your rifle on a bench and had to hold it just slightly one direction or another because you're too lazy to adjust the bench or bags to acquire the center of the bull? Instead you hold it down and to the left (for example) to acquire the bullseye in your sight picture, just to have the bullet thrown up and to the right when you fire. The firearm will naturally try to acquire the natural point of aim, which is why your bullet is thrown the opposite direction of where you were trying to force it. It's tough to train yourself to acquire a natural point of aim, but it's the only way when sighting in anything. Hope this helps.
  • BayouCritterBayouCritter Member Posts: 76 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Lee, I've been to several basic LEO instructor schools, plus I attended Glock basic instructor/armorer school earlier this year. I'm looking for an advanced school to attend this fall - any suggestions?
  • NighthawkNighthawk Member Posts: 13,100
    edited November -1
    sixstringer, these wise gentlemen answered your question in the best possible way it could be described. I cant say anything more to the subject, other than do alot of practice with your weapon empty and the mag,out or cylinder empty. Then you should practice live fire as much as possible.

    Good luck!

    Rugster
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