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73 Winchester

arkansascontrolsarkansascontrols Member Posts: 5 ✭✭
edited May 2013 in Ask the Experts
I have an opportunity to buy a 73 Winchester in .32-20. It's not a primo specimen but it's not junk either, I'd say 15-20% range based on pics. However I have some concerns that I was hoping someone here could help with.

It's a 3rd Model Carbine. 20" Oct bbl, with a short mag tube (extends just a little beyond the forestock). I've not personally seen any carbines with that short tube, but it's possible it was an option.

The buttplate appears to be correct for the Carbine model, however the forestock hardware looks to me like that of of the Rifle model and not the carbine. Rather than a barrel band style fixture, it has the full forestock end cap which is common on the 24" model, but again I've never seen one on the 20" carbine.

Can anyone confirm or deny that this configuration was possibly a factory configuration, or is this a Frankenstein?

73Win-full_zps728b6b7d.jpg.html

http://s1284.photobucket.com/user/arkansascontrols/media/73Win-full_zps728b6b7d.jpg.html

Comments

  • arkansascontrolsarkansascontrols Member Posts: 5 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have a 73 with a stripped screw hole on the side plate. Prefer not to replace the sideplate: expensive and will never match. The hole is beyond peening to tighten it: looks like someone already tried that.

    Am I better off retapping the hole to a larger size and using a larger screw, OR welding the hole shut and drilling and retapping for the original screw. And if I opt for the last method, WHAT is the thread size of that screw? It APPEARS to be a 10-36! Don't know why these gunmakers had to use such exotic threads.

    Any idea where I could find a tap the correct size? Buying a repro screw from Dixie Gun Works and turning it into a "tap" with a DREMEL tool IS a possibiliy.

    Any suggestions or opinions?
    Thanks
  • Hawk CarseHawk Carse Member Posts: 4,296 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    That looks like a crescent rifle buttplate to me, not a carbine butt.

    I am not a collector but a short rifle with a short magazine would have to be either a rarity or a gunsmith alteration.

    Oh, Bert...
  • Bert H.Bert H. Member, Moderator Posts: 11,274 ******
    edited November -1
    It appears that it is a cut down Rifle (both the barrel and magazine tube). Nothing about it is "Carbine". The butt stock is severely undersized to the lower tang, suggesting it has been replaced or that it was heavily sanded and refinished. The overall condition is < 10%.
  • arkansascontrolsarkansascontrols Member Posts: 5 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Hawk Carse
    That looks like a crescent rifle buttplate to me, not a carbine butt.

    I am not a collector but a short rifle with a short magazine would have to be either a rarity or a gunsmith alteration.

    Oh, Bert...


    Hawk I think you're probably right. It would appear the Buttplate and Forestock are that of the Rifle model (24"). The lack of a saddle ring would also imply Rifle not Carbine. I suppose it could be a special order rifle, but the combination of features doesn't add up to a factory gun.
  • arkansascontrolsarkansascontrols Member Posts: 5 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Bert H.
    It appears that it is a cut down Rifle (both the barrel and magazine tube). Nothing about it is "Carbine". The butt stock is severely undersized to the lower tang, suggesting it has been replaced or that it was heavily sanded and refinished. The overall condition is < 10%.




    Thanks Bert, I'm certainly not an expert on Winchesters, but I've seen enough of them that it just didn't feel right to me. I don't think Winchester can give much on history other than Mfg Date, anyone know much about the Letter service from Cody on these old rifles?
  • Bert H.Bert H. Member, Moderator Posts: 11,274 ******
    edited November -1
    The Cody Firearms Museum (CFM) research office can provide a factory letter that will contain the pertinent dates, and the as built configuration of the gun. For a non-member, the cost is $70.

    There is no "Winchester". The current entity that calls itself "Winchester" is a division of the Browning Firearms company, which is owned by Fabrique Nationale (FN). Olin Industries (the owner of the original Winchester Repeating Arms Company) got out of the firearms manufacturing business in early 1981. The CFM is the only available source of correct (authentic) information in regards to all of the original Winchester models.
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