.

sporterize swedish mauser

ddhotbotddhotbot Member Posts: 1,426 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited March 2002 in Ask the Experts
ok guys need help here,just picked up a swedish mauser 6.5x55 .thinking about sporterizing it ,where can i get a synthetic stock ,scope mount etc.what would you do too it? its the long barrell rifle not the carbine.give me some ideas thanks donkeep on bangin

Comments

  • ddhotbotddhotbot Member Posts: 1,426 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    by the way what are these rifles going for now in excellent cond,with the bayonet?thanks again don
  • v35v35 Member Posts: 13,200
    edited November -1
    Mine is still settin in cosmoline after two years. I bought a Timney trigger to improve the pull but wont think of hackin and choppin because the rifles are supposed to be super shooters as is. The bolt would have to be chopped and rewelded to clear a scope and the receiver drilled and tapped. Making the bolt cock on opening will also cost you a few bucks. Sporterized conversions from military rifles used to make economic sense before the 50's but now you can buy good, cheaper new or used commercial bolt actions already set up with good triggers and tapped for scopes.
  • MIKE WISKEYMIKE WISKEY Member Posts: 9,259 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    brownell's has scope mts. and triggers, midway usa has good prices on stocks and scopes. get the redfield jr. base for the m-96 swede and you don't have to grind the receiver like some other mts.
  • He DogHe Dog Member Posts: 48,548 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Retail value is somewhere between $150 & $200 on a rifle in fine condition with all matching numbers. Varies somewhat in different parts of the country.
  • oneshyoneshy Member Posts: 420 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Take V35's advice. As is, it's a piece of history. Chopped, it's a Bubba.[This message has been edited by oneshy (edited 03-01-2002).]
  • He DogHe Dog Member Posts: 48,548 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I tend to agree if the numbers all match. If it does not have matching numbers, it is not collectable anyway, and if you want to go to a lot of trouble and expense to sporterized go ahead. I would slick up the trigger and not change it otherwise myself.
  • l-girll-girl Member Posts: 131 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have two of these great rifles. One is in its original length and I added a no drilling B-square scope mount to replace the rear sight and put on a Bushnell 3x9 long eye relief scope. The bolt is unaltered because the scope is far forward of the bolt. In this setup, it will shoot one MOA groups with factory ammo. Yes, it is long and unwieldy, but it is a great shooter. I also bought a cut down version that someone else had done. The barrel is 18", nicely crowned and also has a 4x LER scope.It will shoot 1.5 MOA and is a joy to carry around. The bolt is unaltered but I would like to get a turned down handle bolt if I could just so it won't stick out.I agree with the other commenatators: don't cut yours down.
  • redcedarsredcedars Member Posts: 919 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    What I-girl and He-dog said. If it is matching and nice it is collectable, and its value will only appreciate if kept in original condition. Due to the gun's age and the limitations of its design and construction, a custom gun built from it will not be worth anywhere near the cost of the customization.But Swede's are great candidates for a down and dirty "Scout" concept rifle. For minimum bucks you can have an accurate, hard hitting, flat shooting rifle (performance rivals the fabled .270 Winchester with some loads) and it won't be too pretty to get dirty. The long eye relief low power scope is great for the old straight bolts and is especially good for shorter range shots or runners. If you expect more of the 250 yd+ shots, the M38 with the bent bolt and set up with conventional mounts and a 3-9x40 is probably better, but the military stock will probably work better with a cheek piece added to keep your eye in line with the scope. If you shop around, you can probably come up with a bent bolt or shorter barrel if that is what you want, but mismatch "shooters" are cheap enough it makes sense to get one in the general configuration you want, then build your lowball special. If you are interested, I can give you some hints on picking out a shooter.If you want a custom gun, by a good receiver and work out from there. It will be a far better use of your money, and the gun you end up with will be far closer in value to your investment.redcedars[This message has been edited by redcedars (edited 03-01-2002).]
  • ddhotbotddhotbot Member Posts: 1,426 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    thanks for your replys all,when you say matching numbers ,does that mean all matching numbers ?mine has bolt and receiver matching numbers only.i gave $150 for it with the bayonet and scabbard and 2 boxes of ammo.guess i will have too comtiplate this one for awhile.oh well gives me sumthing too think about other than work lol keep on bangin don
  • redcedarsredcedars Member Posts: 919 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    About matching, there is not a bright line. For many old bolts, bolt and receiver matching is hard enough to find that it is good enough for collecting purposes. The next step is "all matching", which means exactly what it says. The older Swedes had the last three digits of the serial number on numerous parts all over the gun, the later models not nearly so many. But there are a lot of nice "all matching" swedes around, so one with just bolt and receiver matching wouldn't be very special. On the other hand, since you do have the matching bolt, I wouldn't do anything to the gun I couldn't undo.redcedars
Sign In or Register to comment.