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Man did I buy a lemon!

Riomouse911Riomouse911 Member Posts: 3,493 ✭✭✭
edited September 2013 in Ask the Experts
I love S&W revolvers, and I saw a 2" Victory model for a reasonable price listed. I know a genuine 2" is rare, and it was listed as a refinished, cut and recrowned .38 spl., so I figured what the heck. I bid and won it. Naturally, upon picking it up at my FFL I discovered it was a converted .38 S&W. This was not in the listing, but I should have known better.

Naturally, on the first 6 shots of Rem 158 gr RNL the cases bulged and stuck in the cylinder so badly that 4 of 6 had to be pushed out with a brass rod for fear of bending the ejector rod.

I now own a paperweight ( my fault, caveat emptor! [V]) Does anyone suggest a good Smith and Wesson 'smith who might be able to make this toad into a .32 H&R or .327 Magnum? Hamilton Bowen lists a K frame conversion starting at $800+, so if he is it I will have to scrounge for many moons to pay that bill......

Comments

  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,649 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Years ago ran into the same problem. Was able to get hold of a original used, .38 Special cylinder. Nowadays obviously it's going to be quite a bit more expensive to obtain one, even if it's used. Still heck of a lot cheaper than Bowen's $800 conversion.
  • perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    Just shoot 38 S&W in your pistol you will not have to change ANY THING
  • 45er45er Member Posts: 245 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    And unless deep pockets and able to find it, better to reload those .38-S&W's.

    At least you realize, and readily admit, homework was not finished before opening up the wallet. Oh well, how many of us been there, done that, too?

    45er
  • beantownshootahbeantownshootah Member Posts: 12,776 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by 45er
    And unless deep pockets and able to find it, better to reload those .38-S&W's.

    At least you realize, and readily admit, homework was not finished before opening up the wallet. Oh well, how many of us been there, done that, too?

    45er

    I resemble that remark!

    Did exact same thing a few years ago. . .bid on a nice nickel plated Smith in .38 special, not realizing that what I had was a "sporterized" (more like sodomized) Victory gun.

    Thing looks beautiful, and action is as smooth as glass, but I've never actually shot it. I suppose I "could" have a .38 special K frame cylinder fitted to the gun, but I think the costs involved simply aren't worth it, especially since to do it right, I'd have to match the nickel plating.

    DSCN0393.jpg
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,649 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by beantownshootah
    quote:Originally posted by 45er
    And unless deep pockets and able to find it, better to reload those .38-S&W's.

    At least you realize, and readily admit, homework was not finished before opening up the wallet. Oh well, how many of us been there, done that, too?

    45er

    I resemble that remark!

    Did exact same thing a few years ago. . .bid on a nice nickel plated Smith in .38 special, not realizing that what I had was a "sporterized" (more like sodomized) Victory gun.

    Thing looks beautiful, and action is as smooth as glass, but I've never actually shot it. I suppose I "could" have a .38 special K frame cylinder fitted to the gun, but I think the costs involved simply aren't worth it, especially since to do it right, I'd have to match the nickel plating.

    DSCN0393.jpg


    You should do it shootah. Back in the 60's, during the Bangor Punta days. Smith made runs of what were called by collectors, "Pintos". These were revolvers with contrasting blued and nickel parts. Back then nobody wanted them. Because they appeared to be something carried, by one of the free lance pharmaceutical salesmen on the corner of MLK. Nowadays they are high value collectors items. Here's what they looked like.

    pinto017.jpg
  • Riomouse911Riomouse911 Member Posts: 3,493 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks guys! I will always admit my faults when it comes to impulse purchases, and this was a doozy! I went ahead and bought the K frame .38 cylinder, I have a co worker who is a Smith armorer and has the stuff for fitting and timing. Even though it will probably not be the most accurate piece due to the oversized bore, this will be way better than looking at a useless gun!

    Oh, I just got back from a Hornady ballistic workshop (I have done others with Winchester, etc) They are making some dang good defensive ammo there! In the guns that ammo is issued for, I will keep using what I am issued. But in the guns where we are tasked with finding our own ammo, it is Critical Defense 9mm in the LC9, and C-D . 38 spl in the M49 bodyguard from now on!
  • bartman45bartman45 Member Posts: 3,008 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by rufe-snow
    quote:Originally posted by beantownshootah
    quote:Originally posted by 45er
    And unless deep pockets and able to find it, better to reload those .38-S&W's.

    At least you realize, and readily admit, homework was not finished before opening up the wallet. Oh well, how many of us been there, done that, too?

    45er

    I resemble that remark!



    Did exact same thing a few years ago. . .bid on a nice nickel plated Smith in .38 special, not realizing that what I had was a "sporterized" (more like sodomized) Victory gun.

    Thing looks beautiful, and action is as smooth as glass, but I've never actually shot it. I suppose I "could" have a .38 special K frame cylinder fitted to the gun, but I think the costs involved simply aren't worth it, especially since to do it right, I'd have to match the nickel plating.

    DSCN0393.jpg


    You should do it shootah. Back in the 60's, during the Bangor Punta days. Smith made runs of what were called by collectors, "Pintos". These were revolvers with contrasting blued and nickel parts. Back then nobody wanted them. Because they appeared to be something carried, by one of the free lance pharmaceutical salesmen on the corner of MLK. Nowadays they are high value collectors items. Here's what they looked like.

    pinto017.jpg


    S&W made a few Registered Magnums to order with the two tone design. One recently sold for a boat load of money at auction. Neat look.
  • beantownshootahbeantownshootah Member Posts: 12,776 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Riomouse911
    Even though it will probably not be the most accurate piece due to the oversized bore, this will be way better than looking at a useless gun!

    I've heard that the Victory revolvers used the standard .357 caliber/.38 special barrels, so this may not be the issue you think it is.

    On bicolor revolver, actually Smith put out some two-color Airweight J frames relatively recently (just the last few years). I'm not worried so much about the appearance (you can always swap back in the original nickel plated cylinder) but the expense of getting a new cylinder and mostly having it fitted/timed properly.

    Since I don't really "need" a 4" .38 (I've got several K frame .357s that do the same thing, and better), its probably more cost-effective for me to just sell or trade this one.
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