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Coyote value

JimmyJackJimmyJack Member Posts: 5,426 ✭✭✭✭
edited October 2013 in Ask the Experts
Mobuck stated no value? I beg to differ! Fur Fish and Game lists coyote value from $80 to $100 and it has been there for a couple of years. Fur prices are up. Its a shame to not properly handle the hides.

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    yoshmysteryoshmyster Member Posts: 21,295 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Saw me one of those "Hollywood" Robet Redford type catalog with a coyote hides made in to a blanket going for $5K and change. Kind a made me want to get me a mess of 'em and stitch 'em together.
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    beantownshootahbeantownshootah Member Posts: 12,776 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The list price is an OK point to start the discussion, but I think the best way to determine the true value is to look at actual current sales.

    As some food for thought, if you take a look on Flea-bay (for example) recently sold decent quality tanned full coyote pelts are going for around $50 shipped, give or take a bit.

    Its not so obvious, maybe, but a significant proportion of this value is from the work involved in turning it from a raw skin into a finished pelt, ie, not ruining it during hunting/trapping, skinning it correctly, tanning it correctly, etc.

    So, while they're definitely not worthless by any stretch, I don't think actual raw skins taken off the animal are worth as much as FF&G suggests.

    Edit:
    quote:Originally posted by yoshmyster
    Saw me one of those "Hollywood" Robet Redford type catalog with a coyote hides made in to a blanket going for $5K and change. Kind a made me want to get me a mess of 'em and stitch 'em together.

    So how many pelts do you think are in this blanket? 12? 20?

    Again, the catalog list price isn't just the value of the actual pelts here, but also the skill involved in trimming them down and sewing them properly into a professionally made commercial grade blanket, plus of course, a generous amount of retail markup!

    Demand for these blankets at $5000 is also probably pretty low, meaning that even if you were to churn out 20 of them, you're probably not going to be counting out your $100k for a long, long time!
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    JimmyJackJimmyJack Member Posts: 5,426 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    FF and G prices are determined by last years auction prices and Chinese demand. Ill put more faith in their forcast than your guess.
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    tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by JimmyJack
    FF and G prices are determined by last years auction prices and Chinese demand. Ill put more faith in their forcast than your guess.


    You are looking at the top end range for the FF&G prices, for the western, with mostly light tan. The average price, especially after being shot with a bazooka, is around $20.00-30.00 at best, for a raw hide. Dry them, and stretch them, and you might get an extra $15.00-20.00.

    There is a whole list of characterization, and values for each species, and sub-species.

    Kinda like a fella about 15 years ago, asked me for a price range on an "Old Winchester 1892". I told him I needed to see it. "Well, can you give me a price range", he said. So, I showed him the blue book. His next words, so it could be worth $1300.00??? I said, if it was new in the box, as that is what 100% means. A week later, I stopped by his home to look at it. It had notches out of the stock, screw heads all buggered up, big splinter out of the forearm, bore was frosty, sights not correct, etc... I told him it is a 50% gun at best, but most likely a 30-40%. "But it is old", how much do you think it is worth? I told him $400.00 max, if it is a shooter, with that bore condition. He said, he would take nothing less than $1500.00 for it...because it was "old".

    Moral of the story...he had not a clue about the subject.

    Best
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    tocamohatocamoha Member Posts: 271 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I snared 6 coyotes last winter here in NW Kansas.They were all so mangy there wasn't enough fur to make a false moustache.
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    MobuckMobuck Member Posts: 13,848 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If you get $15-20 for an unskinned coyote in the Midwest(from the eastern 1/3 of Kansas to Ohio) you're lucky. FF&G prices don't mean squat unless you're handling prime "western coyotes" with no blemishes.
    I didn't see a full furred coyote at all last winter. The local buyer won't even start looking at coyotes until late December and he quits buying about mid February.
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    RobOzRobOz Member Posts: 9,523 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Trapperman.com is the place to get info on fur prices. Also your state trapper assoc is great too.
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    beantownshootahbeantownshootah Member Posts: 12,776 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Here's that coyote fur blanket for the "Bargain" price of only $2200:

    http://www.fursource.com/full-pelt-coyote-fur-blanket-throw-p-363.html?gdftrk=gdfV21056_a_7c474_a_7c5141_a_7c363&gclid=CKzslpSKj7oCFUmY4Aod2zYAxA

    In general, prices for furs are cyclical, depending on supply and demand. It so happens that right now prices are fairly high because of demand from Asia, but fur is a fashion trend that goes up and down, and it remains to be seen how long this stays true.

    quote:Originally posted by JimmyJack
    FF and G prices are determined by last years auction prices and Chinese demand. Ill put more faith in their forcast than your guess.

    Its not a "guess", its the actual sale price of actual pelts sold at open public auction last week. If you, me, or anyone else can buy a whole bunch of these finished pelts for $50 a pop, then why isn't this the "real" price? If you really think these are worth $80-100 instead of the $50 that people are actually paying, I'll be happy to sell you as many as you'd care to buy for $75 a pop. Deal?

    As mentioned, the issue with the numbers you cite is that FF&G gives the price for the "western" pelts, which are the biggest. heaviest, and best quality ones on the market. The prices are legit but in reality only a small fraction of coyotes have pelts of that quality, and in most of the country NONE of them will.

    Also, the FFG price is the value of professionally skinned and tanned hides from mostly trapped (not shot) animals. Whole carcasses from SHOT animals are only going to be worth a fraction of that amount; again, a significant proportion of the final value comes from post-kill processing, and pelts with bullet holes in them aren't as valuable as ones without. If the fur in question isn't of good quality (and lots aren't) the potential final value of the finished product simply may not be worth the effort and expense of skinning, stretching, and tanning it. That's why people shoot these animals and let the bodies rot. . .the few bucks they might get for the carcass isn't worth the effort of trudging out there, hauling the bloody thing back, wrapping it up, and taking it for sale.

    Bottom line is, while a finished top quality coyote pelt *could* be worth as much as $100 right now, value of just a freshly shot coyote in the field probably ranges from about $0 - 30, depending on specimen quality.

    Edit: FWIW: Apparently right now the State of Utah offers a $50 bounty for coyotes. Don't know if you can keep the pelt AND the bounty, but even if you can't, the bounty is still probably worth more than the raw pelts in many cases.
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    yoshmysteryoshmyster Member Posts: 21,295 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I reckon head shots would save the pelt and get even money as snared ones.
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    tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by yoshmyster
    I reckon head shots would save the pelt and get even money as snared ones.


    You recon, incorrectly...they like the whole head in tact. The BEST coyote gun is the 204 Ruger, that putd a tiny hole in, and does not usually exit. That is followed closely by the 22-250 with a very explosive 40 grain ballistic tip, type bullet.

    Best
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