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Stock refinishing question.

Gary LGary L Member Posts: 291 ✭✭✭
edited October 2013 in Ask the Experts
I just picked up a neglected Levermatic Model 57M. The previous owner applied some sort of finish on the stock. Not sure if it is water based or some other clear coat but he id a horrible job with a coarse brush.

This is a completely plain Jane stock with no checkering at all but under the grime it does appear to be nice wood. Once I get the old finish off I am well versed in how to finish the job.

My question is how to best remove the lousy finish on it now. I can use a chemical stripper, simply sand it off or even scrape it off but I would like to hear some opinions on which way would be best to preserve the underlying wood before I begin this long process.

Thanks
Gary L

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    perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    Formby's furniture refinisher will remove most all finishes without raising grain so no need to sand However be aware some stocks are stained to make them darker from the factory and this may be a paint rather than a stain.Paint will come off with this product but not stain.
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    k.stanonikk.stanonik Member Posts: 2,109 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Gary,
    I would start with a complete strip of the stock with a finish remover of your comfort, I have used the peeler by kleenstrip on several projects that worked great, after everything is off a wipe down with MEK and a lite sand to be sure all the stripper is removed.
    Tru oil with multiple coats works great, dont forget to buff out the stock between coats till you come to the result you like best.
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    Gary LGary L Member Posts: 291 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have never tried the Formsby's stuff but will give it a go. Will also pick up other strippers I have used on furniture just in case the other does not cut it.

    I do love the Tru Oil finish and have used it many times with outstanding results. Many, many, many light coats over a long period of time and each coat lightly scuffed with 4/0 steel wool and the wood takes on a deep rich glow.

    This would be the perfect stock to try my hand at the art of hand checkering but I need another hobby like I need another hole in my head!

    GL
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    nmyersnmyers Member Posts: 16,881 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I think you want to remove the wood from the gun. And, take off any rubber or plastic, as stripper will ruin them.

    I think that you will find that Formby's stripper is as good as any product out there. Of course, all should be used outdoors with gloves & eye protection. I use a 0000 steel wool pad to gently rub the wood while in the stripper.

    If you want a matte finish, Formby's tung oil works well.

    Neal
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    Gary LGary L Member Posts: 291 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    "I think you want to remove the wood from the gun. And, take off any rubber or plastic, as stripper will ruin them."

    LOL! The previous owner who painted the wood did not do this part and instead just brushed on his finish with what I think might have been an acid brush. He did stay back from the metal and I have the entire gun stripped and the wood is naked.

    I do have one question regarding the butt plate. Should there be a plastic spacer between the wood and plate and if so was it white or black? If it matters, this gun is a J.C.Higgins/Sears branded Model 44 DML.

    GL
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    notnownotnow Member Posts: 1,817 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I refinished a Mod 70 1978 vintage. Chemical stripper ruined the buttplate and the whiteline spacers but had no effect on the black fore end. I used 3M green pads to remove the stripper then a wash with denatured alcohol. Did this twice because I could still see small bits of finish. It's a good idea to have a supply of supplies. I ended up using 3 toothbrushes for instance to deal with the checkered places. It was the first time for me to do a gun with a value over 100 dollars. It needed done really bad. The finish was flaking and the wood in those spots was fading. I could have done a better job, and I may do it over again someday.
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    notnownotnow Member Posts: 1,817 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I've had good results with a spray can of semi-gloss Deft on smooth stocked guns. After I've stripped, sanded and prepped them well of course.
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    00scoots00scoots Member Posts: 410 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I wanted to try doing an "English hand rubbed" stock on a Winchester Model 50 that had been neglected. I had to raise a few dents, do some sanding and whiskering, and take some time doing the finish. With a lot of elbow grease the stock turned out like a pair of spit shined boots! [:D]

    This is what I used and I'm going to do a few more stocks with it:
    http://www.csmcspecials.com/Warthog_Stock_Finish_Kit_p/f0205.htm

    F0205-2.jpg?1378993476
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    11b6r11b6r Member Posts: 16,588 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I also use Formby's Refinisher. It is not a stripper, but dissolves old finishes, spreads them out. Use outdoors, and be careful- stuff is flammable as hell.
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    Okie743Okie743 Member Posts: 2,615 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Gary L
    I have never tried the Formsby's stuff but will give it a go. Will also pick up other strippers I have used on furniture just in case the other does not cut it.

    I do love the Tru Oil finish and have used it many times with outstanding results. Many, many, many light coats over a long period of time and each coat lightly scuffed with 4/0 steel wool and the wood takes on a deep rich glow.

    This would be the perfect stock to try my hand at the art of hand checkering but I need another hobby like I need another hole in my head!

    GL


    Good luck with the checkering idea. I suggest you practice on something else FIRST and get yourself and set of magnifying glasses.

    I also use hot water on some stocks during the final strip process so as to get the old stuff out of the wood, then let it dry for several days before applying tru oil. I use 1000-1500 grit wet dry sandpaper to apply the additional coats, the xxx fine tru oil wetted sandpaper levels the other coats as the new wet coat is being applied.
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