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Removing Release Agent

midnightrunpaintballermidnightrunpaintballer Member Posts: 2,233 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited December 2010 in Ask the Experts
After bedding a few stocks, I've determined that the hardest part is cleaning the release agent from the action when it's done. Can anyone suggest an easier way to accomplish this? Maybe something that dissolves the release agent and can then be rinsed off with brake cleaner? I've tried rubbing alcohol which works. Kinda. But not quite as good as I had hoped. I'd like some more ideas to try on the next one.

Comments

  • Mike FinkMike Fink Member Posts: 274 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Midnight- If all you are cleaning is the metal parts, then you can use lacquer thinner. You don't want it to come in contact with any wood or painted surfaces. Acetone may even be better- same rules apply-Mike
  • midnightrunpaintballermidnightrunpaintballer Member Posts: 2,233 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Yep, just cleaning the metal parts. Thanks for the tip. I've got a couple more guns that are going to get pillar bedded soon. Thanks for the tip! I've been brushing/peeling it off so far but it's difficult to get to in spots. I believe this will make it a whole lot easier. I'm thinking just brush on some Acetone and wait a few seconds. Then rinse off with brake cleaner. Do you think that'll work?
  • nononsensenononsense Member, Moderator Posts: 10,642 ******
    edited November -1
    midnightrunpaintballer,

    "I'm thinking just brush on some Acetone and wait a few seconds."

    If you use acetone, simply wipe the area with a shotgun patch saturated with acetone and then repeat with a patch that is just damp. Acetone evaporates so fast, you won't have time to wait a few seconds.

    You might try wearing Nitrile gloves while handling this stuff as it's really bad for you. Besides, the gloves will save your skin from severe drying which is worse this time of year.

    Best.
  • iwannausernameiwannausername Member Posts: 7,131
    edited November -1
    What are you using as a release agent? The one stock I've bedded I used Kiwi natural shoe polish, just polished it off and hosed the action down with carb cleaner...
  • midnightrunpaintballermidnightrunpaintballer Member Posts: 2,233 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by iwannausername
    What are you using as a release agent? The one stock I've bedded I used Kiwi natural shoe polish, just polished it off and hosed the action down with carb cleaner...


    I'm not sure. I've been doing the work at a buddies house and using what he has there. I can't remember what it is, but it works REALLY well. For cleanup, it mostly peels right off. But like I said, I'm looking for a better way for the hard to reach places. The next time I'm down there, I'll check and see what it is. I know it's in a blue container and it's a blue colored liquid if that helps.[:p]
  • midnightrunpaintballermidnightrunpaintballer Member Posts: 2,233 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by nononsense
    midnightrunpaintballer,

    "I'm thinking just brush on some Acetone and wait a few seconds."

    If you use acetone, simply wipe the area with a shotgun patch saturated with acetone and then repeat with a patch that is just damp. Acetone evaporates so fast, you won't have time to wait a few seconds.

    You might try wearing Nitrile gloves while handling this stuff as it's really bad for you. Besides, the gloves will save your skin from severe drying which is worse this time of year.

    Best.




    Makes perfect sense. Thank you. I will definitely give it a shot.
  • nmyersnmyers Member Posts: 16,365 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Acetone should be used outdoors, or with positive ventilation. Do not get it on your skin. It is carcinogenic, mutagenic, & toxic.

    Neal
  • asphalt cowboyasphalt cowboy Member Posts: 8,572 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Semi-thin blue in a blue bottle. That's Brownells release agent.
    If you want something easier to work with with easier cleanup get a can of their aerosol AcraRelease. It's just as good as the blue stuff and you can simply hose it off with brake cleaner. It costs more, but is a lot more convenient to work with. To clean it out of the stock inlet you just wipe it out with a alchohol and a q-tip or cleaning patch.
  • midnightrunpaintballermidnightrunpaintballer Member Posts: 2,233 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by asphalt cowboy
    Semi-thin blue in a blue bottle. That's Brownells release agent.
    If you want something easier to work with with easier cleanup get a can of their aerosol AcraRelease. It's just as good as the blue stuff and you can simply hose it off with brake cleaner. It costs more, but is a lot more convenient to work with. To clean it out of the stock inlet you just wipe it out with a alchohol and a q-tip or cleaning patch.


    We have a well ventilated garage to work in with the acetone and wearing gloves won't be a problem. I just looked up the AcraRelease and it looks promising. I will mention it to my friend and we just might give it a try. THANK YOU!!!
  • AmbroseAmbrose Member Posts: 2,717 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If I remember right, the blue release stuff that came with the Accraglass kits cleaned off with a paper towel dipped in warm water. Try it--can't hurt!
  • stegsteg Member Posts: 871 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The best and safest (and also the cheapest) material to remove any undried oil based paint, or a release agent is 100% concentrated Isopropyl Alcohol. It can be purchased from a professional level paint store- the one in your area patronized by professional house and/or sign painters.
    Rubbing Alcohol is the same stuff, but only at a 20% concentration.
    If you can't find 100% Isopropyl, get denatured alcohol from your hardware store. It works almost as well.
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