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Remington 511-P any value?

dblodgettdblodgett Member Posts: 15 ✭✭
edited December 2010 in Ask the Experts
Hello, I've rcvd a few firearms as part of an estate and I'm looking for some guidance as my knowledge in this area is very limited.

One of the rifle's is a 511-P - I believe my father-in-law used it to shoot squirrels back in the day, but it hasn't been used in at least 10 years. I'd like to sell the gun but 1st determine if the rifle has any value, and if so, is it worth reconditioning (a local gun shop is asking $50 to clean it up) or if it should be sold as is.

I also have a Remington 521-T Junior Special, a .357 magnum 19-5 4", and a pair of Belgian made 'pocket pistols' from the ~1860's - I'll post those when I get the pics.

Below are some pics of the 511-P - If there are any other pics I should take to better show the rifle, pls let me know. TIA for any advice,
-dave

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Comments

  • HerschelHerschel Member Posts: 2,035 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Paying to have the rifle cleaned by a gunsmith will add no value to it. The 511-P (with the aperture rear sight) is a little more uncommon than the other rifles of the 511 series that have only open sights. That makes it a little more valuable but we are talking about a value of $100 to $150.

    The 521-T, if in similar condition is a more valuable rifle than the 511-P.

    The S & W model 19 is by far the most valuable of the guns, assuming the Belgium pistols are not something special.

    The quality of picture are good and perfectly adequate to determine the condition of the gun.

    Avoid trying to clean the guns. Just apply a thin layer of oil with a small cloth to prevent further rusting.

    Additional: dblodgett, don't be misled by the $310 price brought by a like new gun. The condition your gun is in will keep it from bringing near that, IMA. Many people price their guns too high as they hear of a similar, but in much better condition, gun selling for a high price. Condition is the most important factor in valuing a gun.
  • dblodgettdblodgett Member Posts: 15 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    wow thanks Hershel - thats great advice - I appreciate it! I assumed having the gun shop clean them was the best thing to do. I'll get pics of the others online this eve - the 357 is still in it's box wrapped in paper - I'm not sure it's ever been fired. The antique pistols appear to be Lefaucheux knock-offs and carry the Leige stamp. One has detailed engraving the other has less - but more on those later when I get the pics - I have a feeling there's a story behind them that we'll never know...
  • perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    I agree with Herschel but might add one thing most oils will soften wood .However one product Ballistol is non toxic and will help to protect both wood and metal if you get some of this and wipe the guns down They will look much better and bring more money. Check online or call around any gun stores . wet down the whole gun and leave wet for a few hours and then scrub with rough cloth like burlap. DO NOT use any sand paper or polishing compound. This gun is not that bad. [^][:)]
  • NwcidNwcid Member Posts: 10,674
    edited November -1
    I had a 511P like that. Mine was in as close to new condition as you could get. It sold from a NR opening at $310 this spring.
  • TRAP55TRAP55 Member Posts: 7,995 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Wasn't the rear screw suppose to be a spare aperture? Or was that only on the earlier "P" model Rems?

    sm1.jpg
  • 336marlin336marlin Member Posts: 199 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I'm pretty sure they all had the spare apperture at the back. If you look closely you can see where the blue is lighter on the indicator plate around the back screw where the shoulder on the apperture contacted it. Can't imagine why anyone would go to the trouble of putting another front screw in when a replacement apperture is just as obtainable.
  • dblodgettdblodgett Member Posts: 15 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    thats amazing TRAP55 & 336marlin - I didn't notice that but there certainly was something else screwed in there at one time. My father-in-law was very frugal - I guess if he lost the aperture somehow, it would be less expensive to purchase a screw than a new aperture.

    -dave
  • TRAP55TRAP55 Member Posts: 7,995 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    336marlin must have better eyes than me, I can almost make out the marks around the screw head where the spare was screwed in.[:I]
    One FYI I'll add on these "P" (peepsight) Remington models, the front globe sight inserts are the same as the ones Anschutz made for their .22 rifles.
    They're an oddball size, and made of spring steel, so they stay in with a friction fit. Trying to find original Remington inserts is near impossible, but there's plenty of the Anschutz inserts floating around.[;)]
    It's too bad Remington doesn't make em like that anymore.
  • 336marlin336marlin Member Posts: 199 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    As Mr. Slumlord posted in your question about the 521-T, "Joe" at "apperturesnmore.com" will make you an apperture for probably any receiver sight you have. These sights originally were furnished with a .040 and a .080 opening apperture that is 3/8" in diameter. The ones he makes as replacements are exact replicas and over time will not be discernable from the original. As is visible in one of your photos, the sixth one, there is a little light on each side of the aperture that is distracting when trying to acquire the opening. I have one of these sights that had the same problem and he made me a set that was 3/4" in diameter and blocked this side light out. This may be of no concern to you since you're going to sell the guns but I just thought I'd let you know. Joe's price can not be beat and he is quick.
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