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Browning 22 takedown questions

FenrisFenris Member Posts: 12 ✭✭
edited June 2007 in Ask the Experts
Hello all. First post.

My father gave me a Browning 22 Takedown when I was a kid. It is still my go to squirrel rifle and plinker. I love this gun. I've got the scope sighted in to shoot clays at 100 yards and it's a tack driver at 25-50.

I've deciphered the serial number. It is a grade I manufactured in 1978. While giving it a good thorough cleaning, I'm noticing some small rust spots on the metal which I plan to touch up with some 000/0000 steel wool and some degreaser/cold blue.

I don't really plan on selling this gun; too many memories, but I *do* want to protect the value of it as best I can.

How much would it decrease the value of this gun to add a sling to it? To get it professionally reblued? I've seen similar Grade I's NIB got for $5-600. What's the approximate value of a gun with normal use?

Thanks for any input.

Comments

  • RCrosbyRCrosby Member Posts: 3,702 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Around here (northern New England) sounds like a $300.00 gun, give or take. '78. Is that a Japanese or Belgian? Either way a nice little rifle. It's so light that I probably wouldn't sling it, but if that would increase it's value/utility for you, and you don't plan to sell, then go for it. Just a thought; you might consider a barrel stud that wouldn't involve drilling the wood, then get a second butt plate and drill that for a rear facing stud at the extreme end of the toe. Never seen it done but it might work.
  • FenrisFenris Member Posts: 12 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks for the reply. It is Japanese. I believe that around '74-75 they stopped making them in Belgium. My grandfather passed along a similar rifle that was Belgian made to a cousin, but I don't have the serial number.

    The sling is more because I tend to cross some creeks and such when I hunt and i feel better having both hands free when I'm walking a log [:)].

    I will try to avoid drilling the wood. I looked up replacement stocks and the forward wood piece and they look a bit pricey. I may just leave it as a carry gun.
  • FenrisFenris Member Posts: 12 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Sorry I didn't ask this earlier (It's been a long day and my brain is a bit fried)

    I've noticed that after a few rounds in the 22 the barrel screw and to some degree the scope screws become loose. The barrel screw I can retighten with my fingers, but I don't like taking the scope off the mount, tightening the screws and then putting the scope back on.
  • RCrosbyRCrosby Member Posts: 3,702 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If I'm understanding you right it sounds like 2 different, but both easy to address, issues.
    It seems a little strange that the scope mount screws would loosen that easily. Maybe the screws are a bit undersized? Try a new set of screws and/or some Lock-Tite and snug them down. (But don't try to turn the heads off.....)
    On the barrel screw it sounds like 1 of 2 things.
    First, after you reassemble the rifle are you pushing the small "locking lever" forward to prevent loosening? You shouldn't be able to simply unscrew the barrel without first retracting this lock.
    Second, if the lock is functioning properly try turning the main locking ring 1 or 2 clicks until you are just able to align the barrel and reciever for setting the lock.
    Good luck.
  • FenrisFenris Member Posts: 12 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks for the reply.

    The locking lever is pushed forward, but it will slide back halfway on its own. After reading your post I looked at the gunsmith manual for this gun online and it could be that I am missing a part called the "following spring" I can't recall. The gun is disassembled in my neighbors garage right now. I will check later.

    Aside from the locking lever, what's happening is that the Locking ring works its way loose after it is finger tight. You mentioned clicks. Is the ring supposed to physically click, or were you using that as a general term?
  • DokeyDokey Member Posts: 872 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have a couple of brownings that I've mounted slings on. Uncle Mikes has a barrel mount that clamps on the barrel. I put a piece of scotch tape under the clamp so as not to mar the barrel. On the butt end I simply remove the bottom screw and replace with a stud, works like a charm
  • FenrisFenris Member Posts: 12 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks, Dokey. That's a great idea to replace the screw of the buttplate.
  • RCrosbyRCrosby Member Posts: 3,702 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Gee, I was feeling proud of myself for thinking of tapping the toe of a second butt plate, but I REALLY like Dokey's solution!
    As for the "clicks", I no longer have my Browning, so I'm not positive, but pretty sure that when you turned the knurled ring one way or the other there was a definate click involved. Again, relying on memory (a dangerous prospect at best) it seems that if the barrel would move into position easily, but not be outrageously loose, about 2 clicks usually put me in "having to give it a good snug two *" turn to bring things into alignment.
    By the way, and don't ask me how I know this, it is possible to back off on the ring so much that you come back to a tight fit, but leaving a sizable gap between barrel end and breech. I was ready to send mine off to a pro before I finally realized why I was suddenly experiencing malfunctions galore.
  • FenrisFenris Member Posts: 12 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks RCrosby, when I get it back together I will take special care of that. I might even take some pics to make sure we're talking about the same pieces :-)
  • Jim RehmJim Rehm Member Posts: 102 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    The sliding barrel lock should be held in position by a spring and plunger arrangement that operates at 90 degrees to the sliding barrel lock. The barrel side of the sliding lock will have a tooth that engages the serrations on the barrel adjusting ring and prevents it from turning. Apparently some Brownings used a second spring backed plunger instead of the integral locking tooth which would allow the locking ring to be turned without having to remove the fore end and sliding the barrel lock out of engagement.
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