In order to participate in the GunBroker Member forums, you must be logged in with your GunBroker.com account. Click the sign-in button at the top right of the forums page to get connected.
Options

Was this too much for a private sale?

hxm1982hxm1982 Member Posts: 65 ✭✭
edited April 2011 in Ask the Experts
At a gun show, late last year I sold a handgun to a person who was in the US Military. I was the seller and, the buyer felt that he needed to make a copy of my Driver's License in order to help ensure a legal sale because he had to register it with the Military. He got a show crew member to copy my DL and I bought what he told me as he seemed like an honest citizen.

Was the copy of my DL too much?

Comments

  • Options
    GuvamintCheeseGuvamintCheese Member Posts: 38,932
    edited November -1
    If you think it was, you should have told him to get bent.
  • Options
    hxm1982hxm1982 Member Posts: 65 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Well,

    My understanding is that he did not need to do that yet, a friend told me that the Militaries registration process may be different due to different requirements, I don't know...
  • Options
    11b6r11b6r Member Posts: 16,588 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Strikes me as reasonable to EXCHANGE identity information between buyer and seller. I would want to know who I sold to, and he would want to know who he is buying from. Not REQUIRED, but a courtesy. Others will have different opinions.
  • Options
    tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I believe for the sake of safety, and sanity, you both should have exchanged that information.

    Best
  • Options
    nmyersnmyers Member Posts: 16,881 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I would never buy a gun from someone without recording his identifying information.

    Suppose the gun turns out to have been stolen? Suppose it was used to commit a crime? If the police ever knock on my door with a question about the gun, I need to be able to tell them more than "I bought it from some guy at a gun show."

    Neal

    EDIT: Well, actually, personal information IS required. You may only sell a gun to resident of your state, so you need to see a drivers license, military ID, or some other evidence. Selling a gun to a nonresident is a federal felony, so it could be an expensive mistake if you fail to make a good faith effort to determine that such a transfer is legal. It's unclear whether or not the buyer could also face legal action.
  • Options
    FEENIXFEENIX Member Posts: 10,559 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    +1 on tsr1965's comment.

    On my installation, all that is required are S/N, make, model, caliber, and a section for notes.

    If you're in-processing ...

    On base residents:
    - dorm residents: must register all firearms but not allowed in the dormitories - can check in at the base armory or off base storage.
    - base housing: must register and armory storage highly encouraged

    Off base residents:
    Registration and armory storage highly encouraged.

    This is my 7th military installation where I brought my weapons with me but I was never asked of how my weapons are acquired.
  • Options
    perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    I always get Drivers Lic. information unless I know the person well .
  • Options
    airmungairmung Member Posts: 579 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Originally posted by hxm1982
    At a gun show, late last year I sold a handgun to a person who was in the US Military. I was the seller and, the buyer felt that he needed to make a copy of my Driver's License in order to help ensure a legal sale because he had to register it with the Military. He got a show crew member to copy my DL and I bought what he told me as he seemed like an honest citizen.

    Was the copy of my DL too much?


    Yes.

    I would never ask for or give out personal information in a FTF transaction. It is not required by federal law, or state law in my srate. And it is certainly none of anyone's business.
  • Options
    rsnyder55rsnyder55 Member Posts: 2,526 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I steal a gun, use it in a crime, and take it to a gunshow to sell. I sell the gun FTF to someone else and refuse to show ID.

    A couple years later he sells it through an FFL or has to register it in his state after he is out of the military and it turns up in the NICS as stolen.
  • Options
    andrewsw16andrewsw16 Member Posts: 10,728 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    While not LEGALLY required, getting a copy or at least writing down the info is highly recommended. No, it doesn't get turned in for any kind of government registration. You put that piece of paper in YOUR files, just in case. If for some reason (use your imagination) anyone ever runs the gun and it comes back as being listed STOLEN, guess what, you are "in possession of stolen property". In many states, simple possession IS a crime. It would be real nice to dig out that paper and show the authorities who you bought it from to back up your claim that YOU didn't steal it and that you are in good faith possession. I keep my own personal records, just in case. Any seller that won't identify himself to me isn't getting my money. Something isn't right. Honor those little hairs standing up on the back of your neck and walk away.
  • Options
    wpagewpage Member Posts: 10,204 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I dont think it was too much to ask.
  • Options
    Pistollero1050Pistollero1050 Member Posts: 1,197 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Its not a bad idea for you to get someone Else's info. He probly fibbed a little to encourage you to comply.
  • Options
    givettegivette Member Posts: 10,886
    edited November -1
    When it involves sales/transfers of any goods, the 'chain of custody' may be broken. Happens with every item sold, loaned, bartered..etc.

    However, in re: firearms, I'm not going to be involved with the break in the chain. I'll document where it came from, and of where and how it was disposed. Best, Joe
Sign In or Register to comment.