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45acp

peddlerpeddler Member Posts: 881 ✭✭✭✭
edited August 2012 in Ask the Experts
I just started reloading again after 15 years. I noticed some of the cases Im reloading for the 45acp use small pistol primers & some use large pistol primers. This is new to me, I only remember using large pistol primers for the 45acp. Is this a new trend toward using small primers in handgun ammo. Are these reloadable? All the cases appear to be brass. So far the only ones I've run into using small primers are the "Federal NT 45 Auto".----Thanks Rich

Comments

  • peddlerpeddler Member Posts: 881 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    When did they start making 45s with small primers
  • peddlerpeddler Member Posts: 881 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Will the extractor leave a mark on the rim of a 45acp shell casing? Just started seeing this with a new Kimber I bought. Was wondering if this is a problem. Thanks
  • Emmett DunhamEmmett Dunham Member Posts: 1,418 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    With out knowing the type of weapon could make a difference in the extractor mark. I have gone throug thousands of 45 ACP rounds and most of them have the marks on them.

    Emmett
  • 62fuelie62fuelie Member Posts: 1,068 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The extractor will have a mechanical interface with the outer edge of the case rim when chambering the round and will exert force on the inside of the rim when extracting a fired case. These will usually leave a tool mark on the rim. The ejector will also leave a mark when the case strikes it. Unless these marks are so severe that they cause a concern about the reliability of the case I would go ahead and use them. If you are concerned about the severity of the marks a gunsmith can stone the sharp edges for you.
  • perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    My opinion is "a cartridge fired in a 1911 type pistol MAY be marked in a number of ways" A as a cartridge is fired pressure increases this expands the case and more or less locks the case to the chamber walls Then as the pressure starts to decrease the slide starts moving to the rear . The extractor Hook is over the rim of the base of the case. Then the other side of the case head slams into the Nose of the Ejector. This causes the case to twist to the right and move out from control of the pistol. At this time it MAY hit the ejection port. SO we can mark the case with the ejector The extractor Or even the ejection port.Military firearms are not designed to allow the case to remain UNMARKED. Rather they are designed to function with very little regard to the condition of the fired case. One can reduce marks by varying the load /polishing both the ejector and ejector as well as opening up/enlarging the ejection port. I have shot 1911 pistols for a number of years reloaded over 300,000 rounds. Some cases have been so many times it is hard to read the HEAD-STAMP and still function and group their bullets within 3" at 50 yards . AS they sometimes say about cars used for competition "CHROME DON"T GET YOU HOME" [;)] Don't worry about some marks only worry if the empty case does not get out of the ejection port. "Praise The Hard-Ball Gun"[^]
  • v35v35 Member Posts: 13,200
    edited November -1
    What part of the case are you talking about, inside the rim, the rim proper or the rear which can be marked by the ejector, extractor or both?
    A rough chamber will place a heavier load than necessary on the extractor and should be polished. That would account for marks inside the rim.
    Polishing an extractor carelessly can make it unserviceable.
    Hot loads will increase case marking.
  • peddlerpeddler Member Posts: 881 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    the rim proper
  • v35v35 Member Posts: 13,200
    edited November -1
    A heavy extractor spring will cause the rough front and sharp edges of an extractor to mark the rim of a semiauto as it forces itself over the rim.
    In addition to lightening the extractor spring on a Kahr TP45 recently, I polished the extractor. The pistol now feeds with much less spring force in chambering.Ejection is unchanged. Cases aren't noticeably disfigured.
    As has been said, rim marking isn't in itself a problem.
    If you screw up the parts, they are cheap enough to replace.
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