In order to participate in the GunBroker Member forums, you must be logged in with your GunBroker.com account. Click the sign-in button at the top right of the forums page to get connected.
Options

S&W 38/44 Heavy Duty

Big Cedar IdahoBig Cedar Idaho Member Posts: 54 ✭✭
edited February 2014 in Ask the Experts
The Feb.2014 issue of the Rifleman has an article about the S&W 38/44 Heavy Duty revolver that caught my attention. I have a Outdoorsman version of that gun with a 6 1/2 in. barrel that I acquired in 1948. I decided to try to find out what year it was manufactured. I had never noticed that there were two S/N's on it There was one on the frame (12---) and another on the barrel and cylinder (53---). I tried using the many sources for S/N ID help on the NET and got pretty confused and wound up with dates from 1913 to Post War. Couldn't get anything from S&W. Curious to see if the wealth of knowledge available here could help me out.
Thanks.

Comments

  • Options
    Laredo LeftyLaredo Lefty Member Posts: 13,451 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    William......

    According to the Smith book the frame was made in 1913 and the barrel and cylinder were made in 1938. It looks like one of the owners during it's life had it fitted with a new cylinder and barrel.

    Normally those older revolvers had their serial numbers stamped on the frame, barrel and cylinder. Your barrel and cylinder probably left the factory on a completed gun, but were later removed from that gun and mounted on the older frame # 12---.
  • Options
    rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,650 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    "12---", would put it in the "Triple Lock" serial number range. This would mean the front portion of the revolvers frame would have been machined out for the "Triple Lock" mechanism.

    Compare this photo off the net to your revolver. See if your S & W has been similarly machined?




    Nframe3-3-375.jpg
  • Options
    Big Cedar IdahoBig Cedar Idaho Member Posts: 54 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    No, the frame is not machined for that "Triple Lock'.
    Thanbks
  • Options
    Big Cedar IdahoBig Cedar Idaho Member Posts: 54 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks Loredo,
    Do you think that it may be possible that S&W just made a bunch of frames for the .44 originally in 1913 and then just used those frames later for the souped up .38?
  • Options
    Hawk CarseHawk Carse Member Posts: 4,374 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    It would be helpful to see pictures with close clear images of the various serial numbers and mechanical features.
  • Options
    rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,650 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Big Cedar Idaho
    No, the frame is not machined for that "Triple Lock'.
    Thanbks


    According to the S & W book. The first 15,000+ Hand Ejectors, were "Triple Locks".

    Being yours isn't. I wouldn't be surprised if it wasn't built up on a Model of 1917 U.S. Army frame. That had been diverted one way or another. It might have even been in the S & W parts bins, for years?
  • Options
    dg101windg101win Member Posts: 751 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    My question would be,is the Ser#12--- on the bottom of the grip? Just saying some people look at the numbers under the yoke after they open the cylinder.
    A 44 Hand Ejector Model with a # of 12--- would be 1913. A # of 53---would be 1938.
  • Options
    CapnMidnightCapnMidnight Member Posts: 8,520
    edited November -1
    I'm inclined to agree with roof=snow, it's a 1917 built over.
    W.D.
  • Options
    Big Cedar IdahoBig Cedar Idaho Member Posts: 54 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks for all of the input. I was right about the wealth of knowledge available here. Based on all of the input I am inclined to believe that the gun was manufactured around 1938 or a little later. That would make it about 10 years old when I acquired it. It was in pristine condition when I got it and is still pretty close to that now even though it has punched many holes in targets (very well).
    Thanks again
Sign In or Register to comment.