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Mauser 8x60 Norm

interarmsinterarms Member Posts: 22 ✭✭
edited February 2014 in Ask the Experts
Hello to all the experts,
I have an early Mauser sporting rifle barrel that I would like to learn a little more about. According to what I have been able to find so far, it is a product of the Treaty of Versailles after WW1. The barrel is clearly marked 8x60 Norm (.318 I'm pretty sure)with the number 94U under that followed by an antler and eagle (proofmarks)followed by a J. The serial number preceding 8x60 is 80504. I would like to know what year it is & if anybody could put a value on it. The condition is very good. Not sure if or how to attach a picture of it. Any additional information would be greatly appreciated.

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    charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 6,579 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    How to post pic's the sticky above http://forums.GunBroker.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=259294

    J makes it a .318 bore.

    added. Very interesting, sights and sling indicate a sporting rifle. Perhaps a custom rifle for someone important that was allowed to be finished.
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    nononsensenononsense Member Posts: 10,928 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    interarms,

    The antler, signifies the Ulm proof house, was introduced after WW2.

    The Eagle over N was for Nitro proof.

    The 8x60 cartridge was the answer to not losing your rifle because it was chambered for the 8x57 military cartridge.

    The serial number is in that wishy-washy period of time of approximately 1914. Mauser's manufacturing was devoted virtually 100% to the war effort during those years.

    The .318 bore had been phased out about 1905 so this brings in another oddity.

    Good, sharp, detailed pictures including some from the bottom of the action and barrel.

    Best.
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    MobuckMobuck Member Posts: 13,863 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I think I've read somewhere that .318 bores were available in commercial made rifles later than the military change over.
    "Cartridges of the World" lists an 8x60"S" Mauser which is shown as .323 bore.
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    interarmsinterarms Member Posts: 22 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hello again,

    I am including the following link to some pictures I uploaded to photobucket. Hope that they are accessible & shed some light on the subject.

    http://s1320.photobucket.com/user/MIK_Investments/library/?sort=3&page=1
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    rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,650 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The eagle proof with the horizontal wings dates to 1939. It's a commercial proof mark that wasn't used after 1945. In post war West Germany a eagle with drooping wings is used. "940" is the date 1940. The "antler" is the mark of the Ulm proof house.

    It's very unusual to find commercial sporting guns or even barrels. Made after the start of the Second World War in September 1939. Don't recall every seeing a Ulm proof on a W W II gun either.

    I have never seen one for sale, making it difficult to value?






    P1020042_zpscd3a92de.jpg
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    interarmsinterarms Member Posts: 22 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I just added a few more pictures. I didn't realize that the serial number and 8X60 NORM was not pictured initially. Thanks for the info rife-snow.

    http://s1320.photobucket.com/user/MIK_Investments/library/?view=recent&page=1
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    interarmsinterarms Member Posts: 22 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Correction, Rufe-Snow (my bad)
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    nononsensenononsense Member Posts: 10,928 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    interarms,

    The serial number is still from 1914 approximately.

    The numbers:

    7.85 and 8.1 are the bore and groove dimensions in millimeters. These translate to .309" and .318897" which is usually rounded up to .319 but will suffice for the .318 groove dimension.

    Best.
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