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messed up blueing.........update

hillbillehillbille Member Posts: 14,211 ✭✭✭✭
edited March 2014 in Ask the Experts
I had on old marlin with a slight scratch on the side of the receiver, not much bigger than a hair, but all the way through the blue. I found an old bottle of cold blue and decided I was tired of looking at it, got a qtip and dipped it and swabbed the scratch, when I wiped it off it took the surrounding blue with it.

Next I tried some wonder blue I have had for a while, it didn't work much better, I now have a quarter size spot on the side of the receiver that is smeared almost case hardened looking. I cleaned the area both times with alchohol before blueing, and heated it up with hair dryer before the wonder blue.[:(!]

Has anyone had any luck with any type of cold blue that won't halo the original blueing and may match up better.The original blueing is still a deep black, with the exception of my experimental area...[V]

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well seeing as I don't have anything to lose now, I'll give it another try, do you heat it back up between blueings? before the activator??

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    p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    Sure the Blue Wonder will work, but the patch must be ABSOLUTELY clean, like acetone clean.
    Warm up the area, I use a propane torch sparingly, then apply the Blue Wonder with a clean swab. Let it set, apply it again. Let dry a bit and then apply the fixer.
    After a day come back and brush off the rust and oil.
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    p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    I do, between every application of the blue. After you apply the fixer, if it's not blue enough to your likeing, just apply the acetone again, and put more blue on and then another dose of the fixer.

    There does appear to be a finite life on the chemical, so if you have old stuff or compound that got corrupted by sticking a used Q-tip in the bottle, it may not work right.
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    XXCrossXXCross Member Posts: 1,379 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If you're using cold blue that contains Selenium, it will never match
    anything that has been "hot blue" or "rust blued". They use different
    chemical processes and the results are not comparable. Sorry for the bad news,but that's just the way it is.
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    dcs shootersdcs shooters Member Posts: 10,969
    edited November -1
    Hey Paul, get some Brownells OXPHO-BLUE it works [^]
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    aap2aap2 Member Posts: 203 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Follow dcs shooter's advice, use Brownells OXPHO-Blue. Follow the simple instructions and you don't have to de-grease with alcohol or anything; this stuff works right through oil and is great for tough-up work.
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    hillbillehillbille Member Posts: 14,211 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by p3skyking
    I do, between every application of the blue. After you apply the fixer, if it's not blue enough to your likeing, just apply the acetone again, and put more blue on and then another dose of the fixer.

    There does appear to be a finite life on the chemical, so if you have old stuff or compound that got corrupted by sticking a used Q-tip in the bottle, it may not work right.


    that may be the problem, I have had the two bottles of wonder blue for 10-15 years. I tried the heat and acetone, was a little better but still has that marbled/case hardened look. Maybe it is just too old to use.
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    hillbillehillbille Member Posts: 14,211 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    UPDATE....... never got the wonder blue to work and blend right. It continued to leave a halo around the touched up area. Ordered a bottle of Oxpho blue, (dang shipping was more than the blue), after about 3,4 applications and slight buffing with #0000 steel wool between applications and the area is hardly noticeable. With a light coat of oil the area blends together enough it is not noticable unless you knew or were to look very very close.

    blueing was only $9.99 but shipping was $15. Still for $25 total it was worth it, a lot less than a total reblue,( and except for the very picky out there who just hav e to have totaly perfect ), I think the average joe would be more than happy with the outcome.
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    machine gun moranmachine gun moran Member Posts: 5,198
    edited November -1
    Glad that things came out right for you, Hillbille.

    There is also a cold blue out there called 'Van's'. It doesn't work for touch-up with any other finish, because it will remove it. But on a completely stripped and cleaned surface, it is superior to any other cold solution that I have used. The first application produces a bright pale blue similar to that which appears on some of the earlier Colt parts. The second application will darken it, but still leave a definite blue cast, and the third application will approach black.
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    rossowmnrossowmn Member Posts: 1,959 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have used both Oxpho-Blue and Van's for several years. Van's is much fussier about surface prep. I've found that Van's works well if you take the metal down to the white and warm the metal up well before applying, but if you want to retain any of the original blue, Oxpho-Blue wins hands-down. With proper prep, either brand will produce close-to-black results.
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