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Keystone barrels for Ruger 10/22

Dave45-70Dave45-70 Member Posts: 637 ✭✭✭
edited April 2014 in Ask the Experts
I tried the search forum first but no info. Has anyone had experience with aftermarket bull barrels by Keystone (KSA) for the Ruger 10/22? They are modertly priced and I'm just a part time target shooter so I'm not going to spend hundreds on a barrel.Any info is appreciated. thanks

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    D@DD@D Member Posts: 4,407
    edited November -1
    I have no experience with them. Seeing how your just target shooting here & there buy a good replacement trigger like a Kidd, etc. The difference in accuracy between barrels is minimal.
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    llamallama Member Posts: 2,637 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Adams & Bennet (the "store brand" for midway) has a good reputation for accuracy on a budget for 10-22 barrels.

    Another alternative is to have a 'smith snip the tip and recrown, and set back and re-cut the chamber.
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    charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 6,579 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
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    Dave45-70Dave45-70 Member Posts: 637 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    After watching the U-tube video I would have been more impressed if he had adjusted his scope.It does prove that quality ammo does make a difference. thanks guys
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    beantownshootahbeantownshootah Member Posts: 12,776 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Never tried a Keystone barrel.

    Based on advice from the 10-22 forum, as having excellent bang/buck, I put a 16" blackened stainless fluted Green Mountain barrel on mine. If I remember right, I paid about $130 for this, but this was a few years ago. They cost a little more now, but they're still only a small amount more than the Keystone barrels.

    Anyway, last week I put 10 shots into one ragged hole at 25 yards using (older) standard Remington target ammo. Entire group could be covered by a dime. Never actually tried grouping this outdoors with quality ammo, but at 50 yards, I basically can't miss a 1" target; even with lousy bulk pack ammo I'll hit it ten times in a row to the point where its sort of boring.

    Not sure if this would or wouldn't be competitive for "serious" match shooting with actual match ammo, (my guess is probably not), but its certainly accurate enough for anything I want to do with the gun, and I would definitely buy another GM barrel.
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    holewholew Member Posts: 1 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Noticed that one of the posters here mentioned replacing the trigger on the 10/22 as having the biggest influence on getting better accuracy. The KIDD trigger was mentioned. What trigger pull poundage would you recommend? For target use I am thinking that a single stage trigger set at 2 to 2.5 pounds trigger pull would be best.

    Would not want this light setting for hunting for fear a slight touch on the trigger would fire before gun was properly aimed.
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    md1634md1634 Member Posts: 644 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Two pounds on a hunting gun is pretty light. I think take up and creep are more important. The majority of my hunting guns are plus ore minus 4lbs.
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    beantownshootahbeantownshootah Member Posts: 12,776 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by holew
    Noticed that one of the posters here mentioned replacing the trigger on the 10/22 as having the biggest influence on getting better accuracy. The KIDD trigger was mentioned. What trigger pull poundage would you recommend? For target use I am thinking that a single stage trigger set at 2 to 2.5 pounds trigger pull would be best.

    Would not want this light setting for hunting for fear a slight touch on the trigger would fire before gun was properly aimed.


    "Best" trigger weight is subjective, and largely a personal preference. Some people think 2 lbs is "too light", others will crank the thing down to 2 ounces, if they can. If the trigger itself is safe, and it does what you need it to do, and YOU like it, then its good.

    That said, I do agree that 2.5 lbs is a good weight for a plinking/target type rifle. I'd say 2.5lbs is OK for hunting too, though I can definitely see why you might want to go up to more if you're hunting in cold weather where your finger may be numb from cold, or you may be wearing gloves.

    Traditionally "combat" type guns have 5lb triggers to reduce the chance of accidental discharge under life-or-death type stress situations. For "serious" match-type target shooting, a lot of competitors will dial down the trigger weight basically as light as they can, down to just a few ounces, if the rules let them.

    In terms of units, again at the recommendation of the 10-22 board, I got a "Power Custom" drop in trigger tuning kit a few years back. This comes with a pre-fitted sear, hammer, and trigger with aftertravel adjustment and is VERY good, giving a nice clean crisp break of about 2-1/4 lbs with aftertravel adjustment. These run just under $100 now and are easy to install. I think it took me about 1/2 an hour, and I had literally never even looked at a 10-22 trigger before.

    Kidd now does make a similar "trigger job" kit, and the price is comparable. My guess is the performance is probably about the same too.

    If you want an ADJUSTABLE trigger, then you could look at one of the various drop in units. Kidd has one, as do others (Volquartsen, etc). These cost more, but they drop right in. If you spring for one of the better (ie more expensive) ones you should be able to adjust not only trigger pull weight, but also aftertravel AND pre-travel. You can also go for a two-stage trigger, if you liked.
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