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Increasing M1 Carbine Accuracy

victorj19victorj19 Member Posts: 3,643 ✭✭✭
edited December 2011 in Ask the Experts
I know the carbine will never be highly accurate. However, what can be done to the rifle to improve accuracy? I'll work up the loads. The bore and crown are good, it has an adjustable rear sight, made by National Postal Meter.

This is an import. [V] It was neglected and had some external rust and light pitting. The rifle is just a shooter made up of parts from at least 4 companies. I'm currently refinishing a replacement stock original was badly cracked. I plan on removing the rust, polishing the pits a little and using Gun Kote on it. I don't plan on dumping a lot of money into this project.

Comments

  • nmyersnmyers Member Posts: 16,798 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Many original carbines were assembled with parts from different companies, so that is never a problem. It's usually a good idea to get a technical inspection from a service trained armorer on a carbine that is "new to you", especially if it's well worn. My gunsmith is able to quickly look at each part & determine if it is good or needs replacement.

    The only thing that might improve accuracy is barrel replacement. But, you first have to measure the Muzzle Wear to see if that is bad enough to cause a loss of accuracy. If you don't have a Muzzle Wear gauge, you can use a single round of USGI M2 ball (.30-06), stuck point first in the bore; if any copper jacket can be seen, the barrel is good enough that you don't need replacement. If you can't see any jacket showing, you need a real MW gauge; a MW measurement much > 3.0 usually means the barrel is worn out.

    Neal

    EDIT: Well, since you plan to make this a project, you might want to buy a copy of US M1 Carbines, Wartime Production by Craig Riesch (available from Amazon for $16.33); this book helps you identify parts, & is a good general read. Your test group probably translates to a 100 yd accuracy of minute-of-pie-plate, normal for carbines & the practical limit for the cartridge. Sadly, the scarcity of parts has made rebuilding carbines too expensive to be worthwhile.
    M1_carbine_j.jpg
  • Maxx424Maxx424 Member Posts: 719 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If I remember I will verify tonight but I think there is a super section in the book "M1 Carbine Owners guide". You can get it from Fulton Armory. If I recall, and it has been a while since I read it, the two big deals are case length and the type of front lug.
  • iceracerxiceracerx Member Posts: 8,872 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    A trigger job will aide in accuracy.

    The front 'barrel band' screw can be adjusted (trial and error) for accuracy and bedding the front of the stock/barrel interface also helps.

    One inch groups @ 50 yards are possible.

    Lead bullets w/ gas checks worked for me. I'll try to dig up the load data.

    MVC-001S.jpg
  • Emmett DunhamEmmett Dunham Member Posts: 1,418 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The stock is one of the best ways to make sure the rifle shoots it best. The U S Army manual shows how to fit the barreled receiver into the stock. The recoil plate is used to raise the barrel above the stock and tension is put on the assembly when the front band is slid on. I think the barrel needs to be about one eight on an inch above the stock to get the right tension.

    Emmett
  • b0400879b0400879 Member Posts: 256 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Uhmmmmm .....

    Have ya ever fired this rig for a prelim eval?
  • Maxx424Maxx424 Member Posts: 719 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Maxx424
    If I remember I will verify tonight but I think there is a super section in the book "M1 Carbine Owners guide". You can get it from Fulton Armory. If I recall, and it has been a while since I read it, the two big deals are case length and the type of front lug.


    Okay - I did look at the book and they only have a paragraph or two but the key points are Case length - you should toss any cases under spec which is 1.2" I think but look it up. That will eliminate any flyers. Second is to get the later generation rear mount. It helps to hold the action and barrel in place and finally get the later generation front lug. Those two will suspend the barrel above the stock.
  • victorj19victorj19 Member Posts: 3,643 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I did shoot the carbine. About 2.5" group at 25 yards, cracked stock, etc.

    Max, you mentioned getting a later generation rear mount. Do you mean the recoil plate? How can I tell the difference? The only thing up front is the barrel band/bayonet lug. I assume your calling this the front mount. Is the later stle the one with or without the bayonet lug? I'll measure each case.

    I'll have to try and find a M2 bullet to check the bore and check the things others mentioned. This is going to more fun for a winter project that I imagined.
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