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M44 1946 non-matching

MPinkstonMPinkston Member Posts: 799 ✭✭✭✭
edited July 2014 in Ask the Experts
I have and an thinking of selling the above noted rifle. Condition would rate at VG to fine. First question is how can I tell if it's a Izzy or a Tula? Second question is what should I ask for it? Thanks.

Comments

  • MPinkstonMPinkston Member Posts: 799 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I found the answer to my 1st question:

    Model 1944 Carbine: This carbine was introduced into service in late 1944 (with 50,000 service-test examples produced in 1943) and remained in production until 1948. They were produced from 1943 to 1948 at the Izhevsk arsenal and only 1944 at Tula. Its specifications are very similar to the M1938, with the unique addition of a permanently affixed, side-folding cruciform-spike bayonet. A groove for the folded bayonet is inlet into the right side of the stock. These were in use not only by the Soviet Union, but also its various satellite nations. Many of these were counter-bored post-war. Still need an asking price, Thanks
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,230 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Tula, large arrow inside a star. Izhevsk, small arrow inside triangle.

    I don't know about value? Post war M-N's aren't nearly as common, as wartime production?
  • beantownshootahbeantownshootah Member Posts: 13,137
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by rufe-snow
    Tula, large arrow inside a star. Izhevsk, small arrow inside triangle.

    I don't know about value? Post war M-N's aren't nearly as common, as wartime production?


    I think post war M44s are actually quite a bit MORE common than wartime ones. They didn't introduce the M44 until (yup) 1944, near the end of the war, and most of the manufacture was post-war. The design was also widely adapted outside of Russia. . .there are Chinese, Polish, and Hungarian variants of these (off the top of my head).

    For a long time, these were dirt cheap. You could buy unissued effectively brand new M44s for pennies, because these guns were manufactured, put into storage, then made obsolete by the wide adoption of semi-auto SKS and AK pattern guns. Like most milsurps, those have effectively dried up now. A lot of the guns have counterbored muzzles, even many that were barely used. . .apparently doing this was a Communist era "make work" job to keep the gun makers busy.

    Asking price. . . for a gun like you describe, maybe $200, give or take $25.
  • Dr.NippsDr.Nipps Member Posts: 642 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I'd like to see some pictures of it, but you've got me already interested in it.
  • TRAP55TRAP55 Member Posts: 7,881 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    beantown, they were first made in 1943, those are the rare ones to find!
    MPinkston, ID yours, then search the completed auctions for what they sold for. M-44's have pretty much dried up, and that's driving the price up. Of course price varies with region, but any clean, non-counter bored M44 is worth at least $200 now.
  • MPinkstonMPinkston Member Posts: 799 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    How do I tell if it is counter bored?
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,230 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by MPinkston
    How do I tell if it is counter bored?



    Use a loaded cartridge. Stick the bullet end of the cartridge in the muzzle. If it drops in with no resistance. The muzzle has been counterbored.
  • TRAP55TRAP55 Member Posts: 7,881 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by MPinkston
    How do I tell if it is counter bored?


    counterbore.JPG
    counterbore.jpg
  • machine gun moranmachine gun moran Member Posts: 5,198
    edited November -1
    I believe the Russian post-war production of M44's was about 250,000 each made in 1946 and 1948, and about 175,000 made in 1947. I don't know how many of the roughly 700,000 were imported to the U.S. but there seems to be enough of them around to make them a non-rarity, so a $200 ball-park is not out of line. Of course, rarity is sometimes gauged by whether the front action screw is within 10 degrees of longitudinal alignment at 23 pound of torque at 45% humidity [:D][:D][:D][:D].
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