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Zastava vs Norinco

seb1999seb1999 Member Posts: 343 ✭✭✭
edited July 2014 in Ask the Experts
Is there any difference in quality between Zastava & Norinco when considering a Tokarev type pistol?

Would parts be intechangeable?

I hsve resd favorable reviews on Norinco 1911's

Comments

  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,240 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    It would be best to qualify which exact pistol you're referring to?

    I have always felt that pistols made for the military. Like the Yugoslavian Model 57. Would be made to a higher standard than older commercial Norinco imports from the 1990's.

    Before Bill Clinton cut off the import of handguns, from China in the 90's. Almost all of the commercial Norinco Tokarev's, were really rough condition wise. Although they did have a reputation for reliable function.




    EDIT #1,

    The aftermarket safety. Added for legal importation and sale in the U.S.. Has caused function problems in some of the imported Tokes, as Skyking noted. My earlier post wrongly ignored, this aspect. No matter which Toke you decide to buy. Make sure the safety functions OK and doesn't screw up the trigger pull to much.

    One of our members has removed this aftermarket safety, in a number of imports. And just uses the original half * safety.
  • p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    Being somewhat of a classic pistol snob, I prefer the Norinco as it is made in the style of the original TT-33 Soviet design. The addition of the American required safety (not on the original as the hammer was used as a safing device) is at the rear of the pistol and unobtrusive unlike the Eastern European versions.

    The Norinco's are a bit rougher and that is in keeping with Soviet wartime production. I have never had any 7.62 Tokarev fail to fire and cycle in any manner and long as the cartridge primer functions.
  • drobsdrobs Member Posts: 21,727 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I picked up a Norinco 9mm Tokarev cheap. The added safety was removed by the previous owner.

    A surplus Eastern European Combloc 7.62x25 barrel dropped in and worked perfectly, no fitting require.

    And for those interested. A buddy talked me out of the gun and I sold off the 9mm barrel a good 10 years ago.

    I'd like to pick up another Tokarev one of these days. 1st thing I'd do is remove the safety.

    EDIT: P3 - a gaping hole was left.
  • p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by drobs
    I picked up a Norinco 9mm Tokarev cheap. The added safety was removed by the previous owner.

    A surplus Eastern European Combloc 7.62x25 barrel dropped and worked perfectly, no fitting require.

    And for those interested. A buddy talked me out of the gun and I sold off the 9mm barrel a good 10 years ago.

    I'd like to pick up another Tokarev one of these days. 1st thing I'd do is remove the safety.


    Drobs, I have considered removing my useless safety. Did you buddy leave a gapping hole or how did he fill it?
  • machine gun moranmachine gun moran Member Posts: 5,198
    edited November -1
    On the Chinese Tokarevs, I made a cover plate for the hole which was secured by the two screws that were the safety stop screws that the Chinese added. The biggest problem with the Chinese safety was that with very little wear, the recoil would throw the safety forward, to the 'on' position with every shot.

    The Yugo safety is retained by the left grip panel, and characteristically has a short tumbler, resulting in real marginal support on the right side. Additionally, many are mis-fitted, sometimes resulting in a gun that won't fire even with the safety 'off'. I replace these with plugs cut from good-quality roundstock, cut on top so they are locked in by the hammer housing (and which also prevents rotation), and then cut on the front for trigger clearance. That leaves the gun with the original safety device only, the half-* position (which also locks the slide).

    The Chinese guns are a bit crude, but entirely serviceable. The Yugo military guns are excellent, and incorporate internal changes which simplify takedown with a captive recoil spring. They also use a firing pin retaining system similar to the 1911, although a little more complicated, and they have a magazine safety, larger magazine release, dovetailed front sight, and other different elements. I also have Commercial Yugo Tokarevs in 7.62 and 9mm, and these have a well-engineered slide-mounted safety. There is no provision for half-* on the commercial Yugo Tokarevs.
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