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Rustoleum Rocksolid -

KenK/84BravoKenK/84Bravo Member Posts: 8,967 ✭✭✭✭
edited March 2019 in General Discussion
Deck Refinish. "6 times thicker than paint."

Dried mix (includes Aluminum Oxide) for filling cracks in wood and traction. Mix with water and "Tint." Applied with a 3/8" nap roller.

Got a screaming good deal on about 8 buckets. (Each bucket, will "double coat 100sq. ft.") I can grab a couple more if need be. (Think I will in order to be safe on coverage.)

Two questions:

#1, Has anyone used this?

#2, What type of "Tint," is used to mix in with a water based coating?


Thanks in advance.


-Ken-

Extreme NE TN/W NC ya'll. 😁

Comments

  • jimdeerejimdeere Member, Moderator Posts: 23,820 ******
    edited November -1
    Wow. Looks like some good stuff. I?d like to try it on my oil stained garage floor.
    https://www.rustoleum.com/product-catalog/consumer-brands/rocksolid/
  • KenK/84BravoKenK/84Bravo Member Posts: 8,967 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks for the link, Jim.

    Extreme NE TN/W NC ya'll. 😁

  • hillbillehillbille Member Posts: 13,124 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Ricci could send you some brown tint.........
  • KenK/84BravoKenK/84Bravo Member Posts: 8,967 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    hillbille wrote:
    Ricci could send you some brown tint.........




    Why Yes, yes he could.

    How silly of me. :) :P :x

    Extreme NE TN/W NC ya'll. 😁

  • Smitty500magSmitty500mag Member Posts: 13,597 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    jimdeere wrote:
    Wow. Looks like some good stuff. I?d like to try it on my oil stained garage floor.

    I believe I would give that a second thought. If the paint starts flaking over time it'll look worse than oil stains. Then there's no way you can ever go back bare concrete because you'll never be able to get all the paint up.
  • KenK/84BravoKenK/84Bravo Member Posts: 8,967 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    jimdeere wrote:
    Wow. Looks like some good stuff. I?d like to try it on my oil stained garage floor.

    I believe I would give that a second thought. If the paint starts flaking over time it'll look worse than oil stains. Then there's no way you can ever go back bare concrete because you'll never be able to get all the paint up.




    Or, you could properly prep the floor, coat it, and not have to worry about it in the future. :o

    Extreme NE TN/W NC ya'll. 😁

  • KenK/84BravoKenK/84Bravo Member Posts: 8,967 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Bump.



    Anybody?

    Extreme NE TN/W NC ya'll. 😁

  • DirtyDawgDirtyDawg Member Posts: 1,076 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Not an expert, but in my 30 years of working on machinery & equipment, setting up manufacturing facilities, assembly, and service bays........anything you put on concrete will chip, fade, or de-laminate with time. Drop something on it, and it will fracture and accelerate the integrity of the coating. My best suggestion, polished concrete. It shines, reflects the light to enhance room brightness, can be mopped more easily, and, requires less overall maintenance. Sure, epoxy coatings look GREAT, until you use them, drive on them, drop stuff on them, drag pallets across them, etc.

    In a museum it would be perfect. In a working shop.....hope you have the money and time to constantly patch and repair.
  • NeoBlackdogNeoBlackdog Member Posts: 14,784 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Some friends of mine used it on their deck. Looked great the first year, the second season it started chipping and peeling. By the third year they had to sand it all off. This was on a Douglas Fir deck with a lot of exposure to the sun. What kind of wood is yours built out of and how exposed is it to the sun?
  • KenK/84BravoKenK/84Bravo Member Posts: 8,967 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Some friends of mine used it on their deck. Looked great the first year, the second season it started chipping and peeling. By the third year they had to sand it all off. This was on a Douglas Fir deck with a lot of exposure to the sun. What kind of wood is yours built out of and how exposed is it to the sun?


    Well that is disappointing to hear.

    Thanks for the post.


    (Pressure treated pine.) The ideal scenario is to rip it all off and build a deck properly. This one has too many issues to save I am afraid. Getting a couple more years out of it would be okay.

    Extreme NE TN/W NC ya'll. 😁

  • Smitty500magSmitty500mag Member Posts: 13,597 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Or, you could properly prep the floor, coat it, and not have to worry about it in the future. :o

    Yep that's what they tell you in the advertisements. To bad it doesn't work.
  • babunbabun Member Posts: 11,497
    edited November -1
    DirtyDawg wrote:
    Not an expert, but in my 30 years of working on machinery & equipment, setting up manufacturing facilities, assembly, and service bays........anything you put on concrete will chip, fade, or de-laminate with time. Drop something on it, and it will fracture and accelerate the integrity of the coating. My best suggestion, polished concrete. It shines, reflects the light to enhance room brightness, can be mopped more easily, and, requires less overall maintenance. Sure, epoxy coatings look GREAT, until you use them, drive on them, drop stuff on them, drag pallets across them, etc.

    In a museum it would be perfect. In a working shop.....hope you have the money and time to constantly patch and repair.

    +1000
    After 30 years you ARE an expert.
    I always tell people that look to coat concrete floors to think like the concrete is a living
    thing. It "sweats. pees, shittts, and moves". Nothing put on concrete that IS used, will last long.
    For decking, I just use a stain with no "coatings". You can re-stain right over it when it fades or changes.
  • Edspdog1Edspdog1 Member Posts: 231 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hate to bring it up but be prepared for a disappointment in a year at the most.
    The pressure treated wood has two types of grain, one soft an one almost glass hard on the same board.
    Nothing solid sticks to the hard grain very long.
    Maker and first time users think it is the finest thing since sliced bread and it is for a short while.
    Hope it works for ever.
  • KenK/84BravoKenK/84Bravo Member Posts: 8,967 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Edspdog1 wrote:
    Hate to bring it up but be prepared for a disappointment in a year at the most.
    The pressure treated wood has two types of grain, one soft an one almost glass hard on the same board.
    Nothing solid sticks to the hard grain very long.
    Maker and first time users think it is the finest thing since sliced bread and it is for a short while.
    Hope it works for ever.



    Thank you for your input.

    I appreciate all information presented.

    Extreme NE TN/W NC ya'll. 😁

  • jimdeerejimdeere Member, Moderator Posts: 23,820 ******
    edited November -1
    There is a product called Stonhard (https://www.stonhard.com/your-industry/general-manufacturing/) available for industrial/commercial use only.
    The plant where I worked put it down in several areas. The concrete has to be extensively prepped, but after 30 + years it never cracked or deteriorated. In machine shops, production areas, etc where heave stuff was rolled and maneuvered 24/7, it would barely scratch.
    It?s very expensive and not available to the general public.
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