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6.8 SPC neck up to 7.62

62fuelie62fuelie Member Posts: 1,034 ✭✭✭
Since the Valkyrie has been released and seems to have some acceptance, has anyone seen or tried to neck the 6.8 up to .30 to generate more effective ballistics than the the .300 Blackout? It would seem to be close to the .30AR, but able to work in an upper that has been set up for two existing loads. Would seem to have the potential to be a good pig round.

All this discussion about the "Niche" cartridge is interesting, especially since the ultimate "niche" cartridge is the "Sentry Silencer" a.k.a. .300 Blackout. Yet there are people out there trying to sell it as a whitetail killer. My thoughts were just wandering the day I made this post and I thought that the 6.8/.224 case would allow more volume than the Blackout, but could take the 200+ grain bullets as needed, but would certainly be driven harder than the lighter slugs.
FWIW,
B

Comments

  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,351 ✭✭✭
    edited December 2019
    My first big game rifle was a 30 Rem or a rimless 30-30 so to speak.

    added As a reloader there were a lot more choices of bullets in 7mm than 270. My second big game rifle was a Rem 721 in 270 W. When I bought my big game game rifle it's in 7mm Rem Mag.
  • nononsensenononsense Member, Moderator Posts: 10,296 ******
    edited November -1
    has anyone seen or tried to neck the 6.8 up to .30 to generate more effective ballistics than the the .300 Blackout?

    Every cartridge available these days has been necked up and necked down in the search for another 'new' cartridge leading to fame and fortune for the developer. The vague and useless 6.8SPC is no different. But there is a difference in that the new versions never showed enough improvement over the related cartridges to be worth pursuing. And this is what we usually see, similar performance but not enough improvement. Your question, the answer is no, it would not produce any 'more effective' ballistics than the Blackout.
    It would seem to be close to the .30AR

    The .30AR is actually more effective as a pig gun cartridge than many others which fit in the AR platforms.

    Dual use? Supersonic and subsonic?

    The 30 AR works for both when you use the 230 gr. A-Tips over Trailboss.

    Best.
  • WarbirdsWarbirds Member Posts: 15,267 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I would disagree that 6.8SPC is a vague and useless cartridge.

    It fills the exact niche it was intended to.
  • nononsensenononsense Member, Moderator Posts: 10,296 ******
    edited November -1
    I would disagree that 6.8SPC is a vague and useless cartridge.

    It fills the exact niche it was intended to.

    I knew there was a potential for someone to take umbrage with this statement. But I try real hard not to disparage members with my opinions too often. This cartridge, like just a couple of others, tries my patience with the U.S. government, the U.S. military and several commercial manufacturers for creating what is essentially a truly limited cartridge. As a result of these limitations, there is now not a single sub-organization in the U.S. military using this cartridge.
    By late 2004 the 6.8?43mm SPC was said to be performing well in the field against enemy combatants in Special Operations. However the cartridge was not used by conventional US military personnel. It was not adopted for widespread use due to resistance from officials. The 6.8 SPC was designed for better terminal effectiveness at the shorter ranges of urban combat experienced in Iraq. When fighting in Afghanistan began to intensify, engagements began taking place at greater distances, where 6.8 SPC begins to falter. Experiments suggested that the comparatively short 6.8 mm bullets became ineffective at longer ranges. In 2007, both the U.S. SOCOM and the U.S. Marine Corps decided not to field weapons chambered in 6.8 mm due to logistical and cost issues.

    So it was designed with a specific use (niche) for the military which now rejects it since the theater has changed. So you must be referring to the niche of close range pig shooting, which is truly a niche but not even close to the original concept which brought this cartridge into the military fold.

    But close range pig shooting has a dozen and more cartridges which are favored by those hunters who choose to shoot pigs. Heck, I've got a friend of mine who uses the .41 Magnum in a six-shooter just for pigs! And I've seen them killed with the lowly .22 LR cartridge. The newer .350 Legend, the .450 Bushmaster and many others are embraced for this niche as well. The drawback with the 6.8SPC are the factory loads which stop at 115 grains in an attempt to preserve the idea that it is a higher performance cartridge (the original sales point) which it is not. By all the factors used to analyze rifle cartridges for performance, the 6.8SPC is merely mediocre at best. Now, this certainly doesn't make it a bad cartridge but it is mediocre. If the 6.8SPC serves your need for a pig cartridge, that's great but it did not and is not serving the needs of the U.S. military which was the original intent.

    Best.
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