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Do you wax your guns?

jimdeerejimdeere Member, Moderator Posts: 23,836 ******
I might try this on some of my lesser used firearms 
https://youtu.be/KlToim_s0c0
How to use wax to protect your firearms Larry Potterfield

Comments

  • montanajoemontanajoe Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 54,256 ******
    Never have.  But ya know, probably a real good idea worth doing. 
  • montanajoemontanajoe Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 54,256 ******
  • kimikimi Member Posts: 44,741 ✭✭✭

    I've used wax to some extent in the past. It was a spray on type. Good stuff, but I don't remember the name. Lots of different brands work really good from what I've read. Renaissance is the one that is used by lots of museums. I need to get some. Thanks for the post.

    What's next?
  • truthfultruthful Member Posts: 1,708 ✭✭✭✭
    I sure do. I have used Renaissance micro-crystalline wax polish on my guns for years. A friend at the British Museum got me onto it. They use if on everything. I put it on the entire gun, wood and metal.... I don't own plastic guns. It lasts much longer than any oil, and does not stain the wood as oil can. Brownells sells it these days I believe.
  • pulsarncpulsarnc Member Posts: 5,540 ✭✭✭✭

    I remember articles in field and stream or guns and ammo from the late 60 to early 70s talking about this . They used old fashioned Johnson’s paste wax

    cry Havoc and let slip  the dogs of war..... 
  • He DogHe Dog Member Posts: 49,595 ✭✭✭✭
    truthful said:
    I sure do. I have used Renaissance micro-crystalline wax polish on my guns for years. A friend at the British Museum got me onto it. They use if on everything. I put it on the entire gun, wood and metal.... I don't own plastic guns. It lasts much longer than any oil, and does not stain the wood as oil can. Brownells sells it these days I believe.

    What he said.
  • toad67toad67 Member Posts: 11,824 ✭✭✭✭
    He Dog said:
    truthful said:
    I sure do. I have used Renaissance micro-crystalline wax polish on my guns for years. A friend at the British Museum got me onto it. They use if on everything. I put it on the entire gun, wood and metal.... I don't own plastic guns. It lasts much longer than any oil, and does not stain the wood as oil can. Brownells sells it these days I believe.

    What he said.
    What they said...
  • Ditch-RunnerDitch-Runner Member Posts: 22,348 ✭✭✭✭
      I am about to start on the next run thru of wiping down  checking out my guns ( I do not have a lot but want to protect them )  I try to do at least twice sometimes three times a year get each one a inspection and light wipe down leave no fingerprints 
      sadly I no where shoot like I use to when younger so most all my  guns are hibernating,   I have been using break free for many years then started using the break free collector  grade I think it has wax in it to help with long term storage .
     but next time up I will be using the gun wax just in case my mind slips a cog or three the guns will have a layer of protection  ( I am sure my sons will have them by then ( when I stop running on all cylinders or just stop ) but it will not hurt to keep them protected as best I can  
  • OkieOkie Member Posts: 982 ✭✭✭
    Yes:  Especially for epoxy Glass bedded hunting rifles. Few years back (and I did not even know then that  any type of wax was ever recommended for use on guns) I found from experience that by completely de-greasing  the metal, bedding and wood and applying at least two coats of a good wax, even a good grade of automotive car wax to the epoxy bedding and metal receiver, then wipe down the metal action with a good gun oil or gun grease after applying  at least two dried polished coats of wax where the receiver and recoil lug fits into the epoxy bedding prevents severe rusting vs just using gun oil.
    I've seen hunting rifle's rust into the epoxy bedding at the recoil lug area to where the action had to be wiggled carefully to remove the action from the stock, sometimes within 2 years time if the action was of the matte finish, non stainless type.
  • FrogdogFrogdog Member Posts: 2,365 ✭✭✭
    Yep, I have used it many times before. Just used Turtle-Wax, and it worked well......especially for hunting in the rain/snow.
  • GeriGeri Member Posts: 2,004 ✭✭✭
    Hornaday one shot. wax based, works great, also as a release agent when
    glass bedding.
  • grdad45grdad45 Member Posts: 5,026 ✭✭✭✭
    I have use Johnson's paste wax for a long time, we used it on our shotguns when duck hunting back in the '70s, even inside the barrels.
  • ltcdotyltcdoty Member Posts: 4,100 ✭✭✭
    I was a curator at the NY State Military Museum for twenty-eight years. We treated our extensive firearms and edged weapons collection with  Renaissance micro-crystalline wax polish.  We broke the item down to its component parts...cleaned everything and then used the wax.  We also waxed all the artillery pieces. It took us three years. Besides controlling corrosion..it would keep the artifact relatively dust free. Oil collected dust....you have to remember these items were rarely handled, and except for exhibits or maybe used in a seminar for show and tell, they were stored in a dark, temperature and humidity controlled storage facility.  There are several rooms like the ones posted. Edged weapons in another, and artillery tubes and carriages in two more. 
  • victorj19victorj19 Member Posts: 3,643 ✭✭✭
    I made my own wax and had a giveaway on GBGD a few years ago.  

    Here's the formula equal parts wax, turpentine, and boiled linseed oil.  Don't worry about getting exact on the amounts.  Carefully heat it, mix thoroughly, and pour into a  container to cool.  Beeswax is better but paraffin (non-colored) is good.  I like the Altoids container since it is metal and can be heated to re-melt the mix with a hair dryer and the lid is attached and cannot be misplaced.   Smokeless tobacco containers work well too.   I used both for case lube also.  

    Make just a little since it will last a long time.   A Tbls or ounce of each ingredient is plenty for occasional use.  
  • mogley98mogley98 Member Posts: 18,310 ✭✭✭✭
    My Guns are not Hairy so I've never had to wax them!
    Why don't we go to school and work on the weekends and take the week off!
  • bullshotbullshot Member Posts: 13,174 ✭✭✭✭
    I use Renaissance Wax, that stuff is great.

    "Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get you"
  • bs233jlbs233jl Member Posts: 492 ✭✭✭
    edited August 2020
    Yes, I use Renaissance Wax on all guns. Also kitchen cabinets. Real wood furniture thru out the house.  It works on leather also. :)
  • select-fireselect-fire Member Posts: 69,482 ✭✭✭✭
  • kannoneerkannoneer Member Posts: 3,117 ✭✭✭
    No, but it is probably a good idea. I am continually fighting rust due to high humidity. Guns which are in long-term storage get a coating of grease from a grease gun (just the metal parts). 
  • wundudneewundudnee Member Posts: 6,054 ✭✭✭
    I have collected a whole lot of .22 rifles. So a lot of them don't get shot but rarely. I use Johnsons paste wax and do both metal and wood. If I have one out to just show it I don't get to excited about fingerprints. I have a can of Barricade on top of each safe for a quick wipe down until the next waxing. One of my safes is in the attached unheated garage with a Goldenrod and I have had no trouble with my waxed guns. I intend to buy some Ren wax, just haven't yet.
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  • BrookwoodBrookwood Member, Moderator Posts: 11,438 ******
    I practice the  Mr. Miyagi  school of wax on wax off on all my guns.  

    It not only protects but it really brings out the beautiful grain on some of my finer pieces.
  • drobsdrobs Member Posts: 22,249 ✭✭✭✭
    I don't use it but might try it.

    I visited The College of the Ozarks Ralph Foster Museum a couple months ago (pre-pandemic).
    Huge gun collection (2 floors of more) with guns rusting behind glass. Real mishmash of guns. A few mislabeled guns as well.

    They could really use someone to wax all their guns. Their edged weapon collection was closed but I looked in and could see swords rusting on the walls.


  • JimmyJackJimmyJack Member Posts: 4,852 ✭✭✭✭
    Sounds good to me,  just ordered a can,  7.8 OZ on Amazon for $25
  • mohawk600mohawk600 Member Posts: 5,154 ✭✭✭✭
    Thanks for the heads up on waxing.
  • mmppresmmppres Member Posts: 2,859 ✭✭✭
    Johnson paste wax. On metal an wood everything but scope lenses.  No worry about fingerprints, water,  dust.  It is protected 
  • Lguns20Lguns20 Member Posts: 2
    If anyone is interested i sell a great gun wax with absolutely no chemicals. Completely organic and the best waxes in the world used. Does not smell. https://www.gunbroker.com/item/876469169
  • Don McManusDon McManus Member Posts: 23,136 ✭✭✭✭
    This is my rifle, this is my gun.
    One gets some waxing, the other gets none.

    Freedom and a submissive populace cannot co-exist.

    Brad Steele
  • grdad45grdad45 Member Posts: 5,026 ✭✭✭✭
    Johnson's Paste Wax. I have used it since the early 70s, when we put it on our duck guns. Want to make a rifle or shogun bore gleam? Put some on a loose fitting patch and wipe it in, then polish with a cotton mop. 
  • mogley98mogley98 Member Posts: 18,310 ✭✭✭✭
    edited August 2020
    Never had any hairy guns no need to wax Crap didn't know I already smart aleck answered this post



    Don

    Why don't we go to school and work on the weekends and take the week off!
  • bullshotbullshot Member Posts: 13,174 ✭✭✭✭
    I also use Renaissance micro-crystalline wax on all of my guns, rifles and hand guns alike. Renaissance wax will even prevent fingerprints and it last a very long time. really enhances the beauty of the wood and the metal.
    "Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get you"
  • JimmyJackJimmyJack Member Posts: 4,852 ✭✭✭✭
    I have been since I first read this post.  Seems to work great.
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