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decapping???

Was reading on line  about using a universal decap die rather than a f/l resize die to decap cases. Stated that it put less neck stress, and decreased run out. Would this be due to the slight bind the decap pin puts on the neck while trying to find the flash hole, or is it a bunch of bs? Thoughts welcome... 

Comments

  • OkieOkie Member Posts: 370 ✭✭
    I use a Lee universal decap die quite often and the main purpose I use the die for is to de-cap cases fast that the brass needs to be ran through a polisher before sizing and also to remove the primers fast before actual sizing if I have a bunch of fired cases that I want to match the weight of the cases using a powder scale. (when working up a accuracy load or testing the accuracy of a rifle I use matched weight cases) A brass case that weighs more usually produces a higher velocity due to small inside capacity and will result in a flyer if the rifle is a contrary critical type barrel. (need consistency for accuracy usually)
    What you mention is not the main purpose of a UNIVERSAL de-cap die. Maybe someone knows something about their type of reloading that I'm not aware of???????????????
  • JustCJustC Member, Moderator Posts: 16,038 ******
    most runout occurs during the seating process, not the sizing/decapping process.  You can place your decapping rod in a drill, and use a fine grit sand paper to polish the expander ball for less friction when sizing/decapping also.
  • navc130navc130 Member Posts: 776 ✭✭✭
    I have never read of that being an issue when using a standard rifle sizing / decapping die.  The inside of the case neck is sized by the sizer withdrawn thru it and should be concentric.  The outside of the case neck may not be concentric due to a variation in brass thickness.  This would call for neck trimming by those who load for top accuracy.  Hardly necessary for we who load for hunting at normal hunting ranges.
  • nononsensenononsense Member, Moderator Posts: 10,657 ******
    toad67 said:
    Was reading on line  about using a universal decap die rather than a f/l resize die to decap cases. Stated that it put less neck stress, and decreased run out. Would this be due to the slight bind the decap pin puts on the neck while trying to find the flash hole, or is it a bunch of bs? Thoughts welcome... 
    First of all, please remember that the words you read are constructed in a manner such that you will WANT to buy the product.
    Second, the words may not be exactly true... close but lawyer proof.

    I have probably made nearly every mistake possible during the reloading processes. I try to learn and continue to be aware of each of the problems and the resultant solution(s). This can add to the amount of time you need to spend at the reloading bench until you determine exactly how much work it takes to achieve the quality of ammunition you want to shoot. Some don't require much while others require every possible nit-picking adjustment and expensive piece of gear to make themselves happy. In the long run though, straight chambers and straight ammunition will win the day for most general shooting.

    Trimming and turning necks are two different processes. One is for length while the other is for diameter. Most commercial hunting rifle don't necessarily benefit from either until the case grows in length and requires trimming for safety.

    Load yourself some dummy cartridges just like you were loading for shooting. Find a flat, smooth surface and slowly roll these cartridges in front of your eyes, watching the tip of the bullet. Yes, you may have to crouch down or sit in a chair to see at this level. Excessive runout will be noticeable. Determining the cause can require forensic methods. There are books written about all the causes and solutions. Remember, your cases wiggle around in the shell holder until they center up in the die. But not all dies are created equal nor does the excessive price of some guarantee top quality and straight ammunition.

    Best.


  • Smitty500magSmitty500mag Member Posts: 12,900 ✭✭✭✭
    edited August 24
    I do the least amount of steps possible when I reload. I see no advantage to using a universal die to deprime when you can do it in the process of resizing and priming. The only cases I deprime separately are the ones that need to be swagged. 
  • nononsensenononsense Member, Moderator Posts: 10,657 ******
    I do the least amount of steps possible when I reload.
    I see no advantage to using a universal die to deprime when you can do it in the process of resizing and priming.
    The only cases I deprime separately are the ones that need to be swagged. 
    The bold sentence is a very fair statement. That's my feeling also. I certainly don't attempt to make benchrest competition ammunition when trying to manufacturer plinking, short range fun-type ammo.

    However, I do see an advantage of the Universal depriming die in situation mentioned above. Some of my brass costs in excess of $3.00 per piece and I sure am not going to waste it! I like to deprime before cleaning my brass so the primer pockets get clean. I DO NOT attempt to resize and deprime when I have dirty cases since this has a huge detrimental effect on both the cases and the dies as you force the carbon and dirt through the dies.

    But if you take the time to wipe off each case before resizing and depriming then you should be in better shape.

    Best.

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