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Reticle leveling???

toad67toad67 Member Posts: 9,937 ✭✭✭
I've always tried to get my scope reticle perpendicular with the bore to avoid inadvertent "windage" if a vertical adjustment is made. I've pretty much stuck with the 2 level method, and then used a bore sighter. It usually comes out pretty good. However, I recently came across this little gizmo, and wondered if anyone has any thoughts or experience with it. It looks like it has been out since July or so, so there's not many reviews on it. Just by looking at it, and how it rests on the barrel, makes me wonder just how perpendicular it can get with the bore since it doesn't actually level the gun. Thanks for any input.

https://www.realavid.com/product/level-right-pro/

Comments

  • BobJudyBobJudy Member Posts: 2,117 ✭✭✭✭
    It does say to level the rifle but gives no directions how. I level the gun in an adjustable gun rest pointing at a known level horizontal plane like a window frame. Using the rests adjustment screws I raise the crosshairs to the window frame and adjust the crosshairs to match, tighten rings and I am done. Bob
  • waltermoewaltermoe Member Posts: 332 ✭✭✭

    I have a leveler I bought maybe 25, 30 years ago, there is no name on it other the it says: Reticle Leveler on it.I know I would have bought it from Midway or Brownels, I think it was only around $15. It’s the only way to truly level a scope. Mine has a square bar with two plastic plates on each side, there are 4 horizontal lines on each plate, you just attach the bar to a flat surface on top of the receiver, you can even put on top of a scope mount, the bar is under the scope, you look through the scope and turn until cross hairs are level with each plate. If I knew how to post pictures I would. If over the years you have just eye balling them it may seem like the cross hairs are tilted to you when your done but they aren’t, it’s just you have been use to holding the rifle tilted in order to level the scope. This way when your done everything is lined up, scope receiver and barrel.

  • toad67toad67 Member Posts: 9,937 ✭✭✭
    waltermoe said:

     If over the years you have just eye balling them it may seem like the cross hairs are tilted to you when your done but they aren’t, it’s just you have been use to holding the rifle tilted in order to level the scope. This way when your done everything is lined up, scope receiver and barrel.

    They tend to tilt left...
  • nononsensenononsense Member, Moderator Posts: 10,575 ******
    If you are video oriented, YouTube has quite a number of amateur videos with suggested methods of scope leveling. You can set your rifle up on the bench then run and stop the videos for each step. Be aware that many are not worth the waste of electrons...

    Teaching scope leveling is far easier in the classroom as a hands on demonstration. I've even done for remote learning through video technology with live feedback which works nearly as well. But failing this, in favor of a simple list of steps, I keep this link bookmarked as a reference.

    The clue is to pay attention to the small details and to use two levels of good quality. I use Starrett Cross Test Levels and a set of machinist round bubble levels for some rifles. None of these are cheap but the dime store plastic one are usually worthless.

    Be aware that small errors in leveling will not be as noticeable at short ranges but will increase and compound dramatically at longer ranges.

    Now, if this list doesn't suit you, there are dozens of article which the magazines trot out every year before deer season. The electronic media usually archives most of them so you can see many from years back. 

    Best.



  • waltermoewaltermoe Member Posts: 332 ✭✭✭

    I found the one I have on the web sight at Brownells, the part number they show is: 100-011-731WB. I have used it for years now and it works great, you can read their reviews as well. It is very simple to use, and it will allow you to aline your cross hairs level with the receiver, and not break the bank in the process.

    Now as far as keeping the rifle and scope level when out hunting, that is where a bulb leveler would come in to play if the horizontal reference of the horizon is not level, such as shooting at a hill side or in mountainous regions.

  • brier-49brier-49 Member Posts: 6,326 ✭✭✭
     

    I've used this model for years , works great. I think this is what waltermoe is talking about 
  • waltermoewaltermoe Member Posts: 332 ✭✭✭

    Yes, that’s the one I was talking about. Identical to the one I have.

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