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Guilt Complex?

codenamepaulcodenamepaul Member Posts: 2,931
edited November 2006 in US Military Veteran Forum
Many times after my return from DS, I felt guilty after all the hubbub and parades, etc. that were recieved afterwards. Guilty that you guys had not recieved treatment in kind. Different circumstances, yes, but still get the twinge every now and then. Made it a point at the time to ensure that every VN vet I knew, understood that alot of this was national guilt and it was a welcome as much for them as for me and I would be proud if they shared it.

Thanks, and welcome home.

Comments

  • Ray BRay B Member Posts: 11,822
    edited November -1
    For most of those that I know, it's too little too late; and generally our conclusions are that if they weren't there they neither know nor their opinion valued. any guilt that we feel is directed toward us as survivors when a lot of our brothers-in-arms fell.
  • DancesWithSheepDancesWithSheep Member Posts: 12,937 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by codenamepaul
    Guilty that you guys had not recieved treatment in kind.

    Please, not on my account. In Vietnam I didn't give squat one what the folks back home thought or did. I still don't.
  • n/an/a Member Posts: 168,427
    edited November -1
    I personally know several vietnam vets who went the extra mile to make sure we did not receive the same welcome home they did. My hat is off to this honorable generation.
  • BT3BT3 Member Posts: 1,913 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Well said ECC. Many of us helped plan the Homecomings. Sorry, DWS. [:)]
  • DancesWithSheepDancesWithSheep Member Posts: 12,937 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by BT3
    Sorry, DWS. [:)]

    Christmas 1965 got a package addressed to "A Marine In Vietnam" with candy, magazines, cookies and bon-bons dripping with rum. Christmas 1967 got a package addressed to "A Marine In Vietnam" with a can of dog food and a plastic spoon and a note saying "Eat, you animal!" Guess which one lifted my spirits more.
  • gap1916gap1916 Member Posts: 4,977
    edited November -1
    We did not serve for the parade or the medals not for honor or glory. For each individual there is a reason. Time has not changed this.
  • Grunt2Grunt2 Member Posts: 2,527 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I for one didn't care then or now...But nothing will bring a smile to my face quicker (ok there are a few other things) than seeing the honor and support our troops are getting now.... Once in a while I run across an old WWII or Korean vet wearing a unit hat...I make a point of shaking his hand and thanking him..
    Retired LEO
    Combat Vet VN
    D.A.V Life Member
  • codenamepaulcodenamepaul Member Posts: 2,931
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by gap1916
    We did not serve for the parade or the medals not for honor or glory. For each individual there is a reason. Time has not changed this.


    No one did. Not saying this.
  • codenamepaulcodenamepaul Member Posts: 2,931
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by BT3
    Well said ECC. Many of us helped plan the Homecomings. Sorry, DWS. [:)]


    Yes, well said. Good work BT. Thanks.
  • 196 lib196 lib Member Posts: 8 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Nothing but respect for the WWII Vets, but there were a lot of them that saw the VN Vets as "losers and dopers" just like society at large did. Some Vet organizations back then wouldn't support VN Vet groups when the fight for recognition of "agent orange" effects was going on...maybe the reason they're having problems getting them to join now.
  • Byron R. EnglerByron R. Engler Member Posts: 20 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Remember many of us Vietnam Vets were going because our grandfathers fought in WWI, fathers in WWII or maybe Korea. It was a family tradition and pride to make sure many of the young men went and did their duty for their country. I went and gave. I remember the WWII Veterans had a saying before I was old enough to enlist, they would talk about locals in our small town. They said that one never served because he had a yellow stripe down his back. All my three uncles, Grandfather, Dad and 8 of my cousins and myself have served since WWI.

    I had pride, and was proud to go. Came home, and being shunned, asked how much dope I smoked, why I was stupid enough to stay in when it was not recognized as a war and that American GI's were not wanted in VN. Dumb * people, did they not know that during time of this police action, you could be shot for desertion, and you just don't go AWOL with out lots of problems. Ignorant people breed ignorant kids.
  • divecopdivecop Member Posts: 778 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I went because of my Dad, Uncles and other family members before me.
    It was an honorable thing to do for your country and to protect our
    freedom. They did it and I wanted to do the same. But when I came home it wasn't the same. We didn't get the welcome home that my Dad
    and other family members got. But I still think it was the right thing to do. I volunteered to join the service and then I volunteered
    to go to VN. I thank every WWII veteran I come across for what he did for me and my generation.
  • HAIRYHAIRY Member Posts: 23,606
    edited November -1
    fb: quote: As far as the welcome home is concerned they can keep it. It is more of an insult now. When I came home after my first tour I was greeted at the airport by protesters who were throwing dirty diapers and trash. So I got back on the plane and flew back and stayed till the end. And how did you accomplish this? Surely you weren't discharged in 'Nam; you would have to purchase airline tickets and you would also have to get back into the service. What unit did you serve in?
  • Tiger6Tiger6 Member Posts: 1,707 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    HAIRY, I think your on the right track as fb's stated actions do not make sense... Something is starting to smell bad!
  • Tiger6Tiger6 Member Posts: 1,707 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Yea, and my Granny wore combat boots, and if frogs had wings they would not bump their * when the jump!

    fb... If you were enlisted and compleated basic, your records are someplace and they will detail your assignments.. The "I was in but never there" drill... and the I forget what unit I was with, is another foggy answer that ain't making it.. You were either in the Army or not.. and don't try the "its classified" act either.. there are only a few of these left, and trust me, you were not in any of them..

    Quit trying to shine us on before this gets nasty!
  • Ray BRay B Member Posts: 11,822
    edited November -1
    I have a friend that was SF. He was in a unit that was broken down into teams consisting of a US team leader, US assistant leader, and 3 montags. They would be inserted into North Vietnam, so their missions were not documented as to the actual location, and since there wasn't opportunity to transport those that were killed, the soldiers were officially listed as MIA. But the point is that listening to my friend, and reading Fuzz's comments; the latter sounds more like fiction.
  • Tiger6Tiger6 Member Posts: 1,707 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Ray B, Your friend was most likely assigned under MAC-V.. Although his mission details may not appear in the service record, his assignment and record of service would be documented.

    fb's statements appear "out there" and give cause for question.
  • HAIRYHAIRY Member Posts: 23,606
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Tiger6
    Ray B, Your friend was most likely assigned under MAC-V.. Although his mission details may not appear in the service record, his assignment and record of service would be documented.

    fb's statements appear "out there" and give cause for question.
    Yep; we were under the same "you don't exist" if you are caught rules--no military ID at all. That did not do away with the paper trail, tho.
  • Ray BRay B Member Posts: 11,822
    edited November -1
    Hairy- Correct, My friends name is Pat; His asignment was part of MACV; he was a staff sgt and wore uniform, dog-tags and was otherwise US Army, the only detail that was obscured was that they'd be flown into areas suspected of being base camps for NVA, generally a few miles into North Vietnam. But his service record and the morning reports confirm his actions.
  • alaska 207alaska 207 Member Posts: 16 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    It is not for me to judge if you were or you were'nt. If you have the need to make yourself important by shady, to say the least, stories, you just need to remember one thing. Those who did, did so for a number of reasons, most of them valid ones. Many have mentioned family traditions, as was my case. We had a duty, we did our duty, and we came home. I have never felt the need to advertise the fact I was there, quite to the contrary. I have lived in Alaska for 25 years, and aside from my wife, my two children, and my brother, I can count on one hand the number of people who know, and I like it that way.

    As far as the welcome home that is being afforded to our troops now, I can only say that it makes me feel wonderful. We cannot change what is past, but we can damn sure do our part to see that it never happens again.
  • the real fuzzthe real fuzz Member Posts: 18 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Sorry for all the stink in the forum. I came in lastnight from bootcamp and sat down at my comp and when I turned on the screen I was looking at a new message to be posted. About that time my brother walked in from the shower and saw me and ran. I am a 24 year old state trooper and he was watching my house for me while I was gone. He likes to stir up the poo . He is currently handcuffed to the top rail of the car port. Thinkin about using him as a punching bag! . He will be there for a while. Anyway I just wanted to apologize on behalf of my !@*^ing brother. I am very sorry. I have many friends that went and served there. I have the upmost respect for you guys and if any of you have any suggestions for punishment for my bro please let me know.
  • dheffleydheffley Member Posts: 25,000
    edited November -1
    Real Fuzz,

    I have deleted his posts. Please keep the children off of the computer. Everyone here knew he was a liar because of what and how he said things, but we were going to let it go a little longer before we hammered him. I don't know if you are for real or not, but if you are, you are welcome here. He's not.
  • the real fuzzthe real fuzz Member Posts: 18 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thank you for deleting his post. And I just want to say again that I am sorry for his actions. He is 21 and should know better. I did not mean for him to be able to get on here, but it saves my pw and logges him in. He is still cuffed to the the car port and will stay there till I am tired of seeing him there. Again I am truely sorry. I would like to know what it is like to go but I was classified 4F due to heart problems and a boken hip from highschool sports. I am glad that there are people like yall that will go when asked and if needed make the sacrafices asked by those who would not go. If there is anything I can do to make it up, please dont be afraid to tell me. I am still open to punishent suggestions for him. Thanks
  • TexasVetTexasVet Member Posts: 2,847 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Ray B
    Hairy- Correct, My friends name is Pat; His asignment was part of MACV; he was a staff sgt and wore uniform, dog-tags and was otherwise US Army, the only detail that was obscured was that they'd be flown into areas suspected of being base camps for NVA, generally a few miles into North Vietnam. But his service record and the morning reports confirm his actions.


    No sterile uniforms, batta boots or AK's?
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