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Brothers and sisters, one and all

dheffleydheffley Member Posts: 25,000
I'm very thankful that all of you were there to answer the call of our nation and serve. God bless you and yours.

Comments

  • Smoky14Smoky14 Member Posts: 503 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks boss. Over heard a discussion the other day about how much better the guys in the sand pile are than we were. The impression was that the generals were keeping a closer eye on the grunts so they would not be "baby killers".

    Thanks to my bride, I'm not in jail and had the ability to walk off.
    I'm glad the GIs of today are getting such good support, but it kinda makes me a little jealous[:(!]

    Just a thought. Smoky
  • kimikimi Member Posts: 44,609 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Same to you and your family, Danny!
    What's next?
  • guntech59guntech59 Member Posts: 23,193 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Smoky14
    Thanks boss. Over heard a discussion the other day about how much better the guys in the sand pile are than we were. The impression was that the generals were keeping a closer eye on the grunts so they would not be "baby killers".

    Thanks to my bride, I'm not in jail and had the ability to walk off.
    I'm glad the GIs of today are getting such good support, but it kinda makes me a little jealous[:(!]

    Just a thought. Smoky


    Hopefully you didn't take that crap seriously.

    The difference, if there really is any, is that todays soldiers have the support of the nation behind them. They are hailed as heroes, not treated with scorn and disgust like the soldiers returning from Vietnam.

    I had a long discussion on this subject with my ex-FIL. He was a WWII Vet and I am a DS/DD Vet. He retired in 63 or so and just never understood the whole 60's and Vietnam thing. I gave him a better understanding of it and he gave me tons of advice to make me a better NCO. Good trade.
  • River RatRiver Rat Member Posts: 9,022
    edited November -1
    My experience was in the Navy, although divided between a carrier in the South China Sea and a river assault/patrol operation on the Mekong. The 30-year-old carrier was a more dangerous assignment, generally, but I don't say that to diminish the brown water navy. Both were hazardous for the unwary.

    They were a good group of men and boys, for the most part. A few whiners who joined the Navy to avoid the Army draft, and a handful of juvenile delinquents foisted on us by well-meaning parents and prosecuting attorneys; we called those "bed-wetters." But slackers and misfits weren't all that welcome in "* country," and tended to find cushy jobs away from the action.

    I'll tell you what: we got it done. We watched out for each other, and did whatever needed doing. Sometimes that meant sleepless nights or bad food, but it got done.
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