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Marine's TO

GeriGeri Member Posts: 1,724 ✭✭✭
edited March 2014 in US Military Veteran Forum
What is a Marine's personal T.O.?

Comments

  • 1911builderMarine1911builderMarine Member Posts: 48 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    What do you mean by "T.O."???

    Charles.
  • GeriGeri Member Posts: 1,724 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    That is what I am trying to find out.
  • Sky SoldierSky Soldier Member Posts: 460 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    It could be any number of things.
    Theater of Operations.
    Tactical Operation.
    Tactical Officer.
    Try helping us out with a little more info, maybe the sentence you heard it in or what was being discussed when it came up.

    SS
  • kimikimi Member Posts: 44,675 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Probably the type of weapon used according to a Marine's position and table of organization.
    What's next?
  • GeriGeri Member Posts: 1,724 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I think Kimi has it. This former marine mentioned that the scope sighted bolt rifle was his T.O. I am not familiar with the term so had to ask. Thanks.
  • Ray BRay B Member Posts: 11,822
    edited November -1
    It's going waaay back, but it seems to me that TO was followed by Weapon, as noted; for a given rank and MOS, e.g. an officers "TO" would have been a 1911 .45.
  • ignats555ignats555 Member Posts: 7 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    My TO weapon was an M1911 A1 pistol as a 2531 radio operator.
  • MMOMEQ-55MMOMEQ-55 Member Posts: 13,134
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by ignats555
    My TO weapon was an M1911 A1 pistol as a 2531 radio operator.



    I started out as a 2531 back in 1970. Went to San Diego for school. Later went 0321 when radio operators were in such short supply in VN with 3rd Recon Bn. Found out later why they were in such short supply. Hell we were the first targets the VC went for. Something about that antenna sticking up being a target, just follow it to the bottom and shoot. I can actually say a Prc-25 saved my life. A round hit my 25 and glanced off.

    Hated when I had to carry a KY 38 along with that Prc-25. That meant extra batteries and the code book along with incinerator grenades to destroy the Crypto in case we were over run. Total weight was about 80# of radio, batteries, crypto gear.

    My TO was a 1911 but carried an M-14 and later on picked up a M-79 just for luck.
  • ignats555ignats555 Member Posts: 7 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    KY 38 was hooked up to a PRC 77 which looked just like a PRC 25. I carried a 25 using a rifle sling over my left shoulder so I could get it off me ricky-tick if need be. It's true that the NVA normally tried to take out the radio operators for obvious reasons. I can still remember the bumble-bee buzz as a round went past my gourd during a ambush fire fight in the Arizona. I was the company 1-4 or FAC. I could talk to helicopters and OV 10's using the 25. The jets were on UHF and we didn't carry that gear on a company lever. So, we had to relay instructions through the OV10 guys. They all had call signs with the word "hostage" in it, i.e. Hostage Snake or Hostage Jack etc. They helped us out beau coup.
  • Rick S.Rick S. Member Posts: 33 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I got medevaced out of the Arizona Territory on May 2, 1969.
    Never got back. (Which was OK with me!)
    Grid was 825457. West across the river from An Hoa.
  • TombstonejimTombstonejim Member Posts: 196 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    It stands for Table Of Organization and Equipment. It is the document that specifies exactly what pieces of equipment each organization has and goes down to individual soldiers.

    https://www.google.com/#q=table+of+organization+usmc
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