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fixing to deploy

jasonc14jasonc14 Member Posts: 383 ✭✭✭
edited September 2009 in US Military Veteran Forum
in a few weeks, im shippin off to Afghanistan from camp lejeune.

today one of our plt sgts had a PME about deploying and asked questions like
"whos scared of deploying?" "who thinks they might freeze up?" etc etc...

then i had a thought. what am i going to do when that IED blows up either near my vic or i watch the vic in front of me get hit then an rpg flies over and the next thing you know there is small arms fire impacting near us?

i dont want anyone to recall horrible war memories but if i may ask those who are willing to share their thoughts or experiences the first time the SHTF and even some advice for a 25 year old 1 year Lcpl with a wife and newborn son.

id also like to add thank you for your service, thank you in advance for sharing and semper fidelis.

Comments

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    grumpygygrumpygy Member Posts: 53,466
    edited November -1
    Might be better to ask this on grunt.com


    Cannot be of any help for you since I was a peace time Marine. During the 1st Gulf War I was undeployable.
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    n/an/a Member Posts: 168,427
    edited November -1
    jasonc14,

    I want to thank you for your service.

    My oldest son is at Camp Lejeune right now as well (2/2) and is schedualed to deploy in Aug. or Sept. to Afganistnan.

    Don't worry about the questions as they are just SOP and they have to ask them.

    It is very normal to have some fear in you and you really would not be human if you didn't. Nobody really knows how they will handle themselves under fire untill they have been faced with it. They can give you all the training in the world but when it happens for real it is totally different. Yes your training is needed and will help you get through whatever comes your way but there just isn't the reality factor durring the training exersises.

    You will be fine and I'll keep you in my prayers as I keep all our troops who are in harms way.
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    n/an/a Member Posts: 168,427
    edited November -1
    When the SHTF, I was momentarily scared to death. I asked the Lord for His protection and did my job. You will do the same. May God watch over you, protect you, and bring you home unharmed. Thank you for your service!
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    wittynbearwittynbear Member Posts: 4,518
    edited November -1
    Anyone who tells you they are not scared is either a liar of just plum nuts. I was scarred but I only remember being scarred when I had time to think about it. When you would think you will be most scarred you won't. You may freeze up your first time in a firefight, maybe even your second but you'll snap out of it. Keep in mind what you have to do not what could happen. Most of the time in a firefight you won't feel fear, you just don't have time to think about it. Afterwards you'll look back on things and be scarred for what could have happened, and get real nervous, start shaking and thinking about things. Its normal to do this just don't let fear control you..

    You'll act on instinct and training, you'll fight for your brothers to your left and right. Keep in mind their * is in their hands and your * is in theirs. Take care of each other. You will find out what it truly means to be a Marine, they will take care of you and you will take care of them regardless of rank, just like brothers.

    As poopty as it sounds you need to put your wife and kids into the back of your mind, a firefight is no time to be getting scarred of never seeing them again, you could get yourself and others killed. Keep their pictures in a bible in basecamp with letters from home. Write often, and don't worry about them too much. Don't write home about the details of things but keep in touch it will help your morale.

    Get to know some really good NCOs and SNCOs who have been around the block a few times and learn as much as you can from them. You'll do some strange things that may seem odd to anyone else like praying one minute, and yelling and cursing the next, don't worry its normal in that situation. Get right with the Lord, and make sure your family has other family and friends to lean on while you are away.

    You'll develop your own theory on religion, life, death, and other important things while you are there. In the meantime I will give you my personal observation. There is no such thing as an atheist, they just don't know and are afraid of the truth, there is especially no such thing as an atheist in combat. When you are born you have a certain number of days you are going to live whether you choose to be a Marine or a barber it doesn't matter, no matter what you are doing when your number is called your time is up. Hope this helps, If you have any questions you can email me I'll be glad to help if I can.

    Semper Fidelis.
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    jasonc14jasonc14 Member Posts: 383 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by ECC
    When the SHTF, I was momentarily scared to death. I asked the Lord for His protection and did my job. You will do the same. May God watch over you, protect you, and bring you home unharmed. Thank you for your service!




    thats so true. sometimes i forget i have the good Lord watchful eyes over me and my comrades. thank you for reminding me!
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    jasonc14jasonc14 Member Posts: 383 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by wittynbear
    Anyone who tells you they are not scared is either a liar of just plum nuts. I was scarred but I only remember being scarred when I had time to think about it. When you would think you will be most scarred you won't. You may freeze up your first time in a firefight, maybe even your second but you'll snap out of it. Keep in mind what you have to do not what could happen. Most of the time in a firefight you won't feel fear, you just don't have time to think about it. Afterwards you'll look back on things and be scarred for what could have happened, and get real nervous, start shaking and thinking about things. Its normal to do this just don't let fear control you..

    You'll act on instinct and training, you'll fight for your brothers to your left and right. Keep in mind their * is in their hands and your * is in theirs. Take care of each other. You will find out what it truly means to be a Marine, they will take care of you and you will take care of them regardless of rank, just like brothers.

    As poopty as it sounds you need to put your wife and kids into the back of your mind, a firefight is no time to be getting scarred of never seeing them again, you could get yourself and others killed. Keep their pictures in a bible in basecamp with letters from home. Write often, and don't worry about them too much. Don't write home about the details of things but keep in touch it will help your morale.

    Get to know some really good NCOs and SNCOs who have been around the block a few times and learn as much as you can from them. You'll do some strange things that may seem odd to anyone else like praying one minute, and yelling and cursing the next, don't worry its normal in that situation. Get right with the Lord, and make sure your family has other family and friends to lean on while you are away.

    You'll develop your own theory on religion, life, death, and other important things while you are there. In the meantime I will give you my personal observation. There is no such thing as an atheist, they just don't know and are afraid of the truth, there is especially no such thing as an atheist in combat. When you are born you have a certain number of days you are going to live whether you choose to be a Marine or a barber it doesn't matter, no matter what you are doing when your number is called your time is up. Hope this helps, If you have any questions you can email me I'll be glad to help if I can.

    Semper Fidelis.


    that really puts things into perspective. it reminds me of situations where ive been in car accidents or other potentially dangerous situations. when it gets down to it your instincts take over and so far they havent let me down obviously because im still alive.

    that re instills more confidence in myself because in those situations i didnt panic or get nervous. id always take a breath after that huge initial shot of adrenaline and do what God is guiding you to do regardless of what might be at stake.

    i appreciate the comments.
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    wittynbearwittynbear Member Posts: 4,518
    edited November -1
    Now is the time to train, if something scares you bring it up and train on it. When you get in a firefight move with a purpose, but move deliberately, calculate everything, and follow your training. Just remember smooth is fast and fast is smooth. That means don't get in a rush and load an empty mag, or do something stupid, halfassed, or sloppy. Move with a purpose as fast as you can but as slow as you must. You should have some good NCOs and SNCOs, listen to them, especially the ones who have been there before. You'll do fine. When you get back don't expect things to be normal imediately, it can be just as stressful as when you left, things will return to normal it just takes some time. I know when I came back I had some very serious anger and aggression issues, still do sometimes. If you need it there is no shame in asking for help, talk to a chaplain, a headshrink, or go talk to someone at the local vetcenter, don't be hardheaded like I was. When you get back home take some time away and have a few beers you earned it. Best of luck to you, and God bless. Semper Fidelis.
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    oldwolf49oldwolf49 Member Posts: 73 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Being afraid is ok, IF you only allow yourself a few seconds to be panicked and then do what you have to do. Just a few seconds no more.
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    jinxkatjinxkat Member Posts: 1 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Been there done that! I finished my 2nd tour in the sand box. 1st was durring the original gulf war. When you here those bullets zip by it kind'a makes you mad but scared for a second. Then you fight back! Not for the President or the General but for your buds.
    This last go arround I spent more time outside the wire than inside the FOB. 36 catistropic kill recoveries southwest of Bagdad, AKA the triangle of death. You name it you'll see it, the good,bad,ugly. Rember that you matter and your buds matter. You can get too wraped up in it all.
    Listen to those that know NOT the wann'a be Rambos. Keep cool,keep your head and never forget where you are and where you want to be when it's all over.
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    SpotterSpotter Member Posts: 74 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    First off, thank you for your service, I'm proud of you. Second, I'm sure ALOT of people have the same question in their head.

    What to do? Can't tell you that.

    Me? I learned to breathe. A simple thing really but I concentrated on my breathing and did my job. Amazing how clear that front sight post is with super oxygenated blood or fast you can move for that matter.

    Afterwards, I had a few select songs that I would settle myself down with. I like the oldies and Dusty Springfield/Otis Redding/Marvin Gaye brought me back and I wasn't so 'gungy'. Did I cry? Hell yeah, I did but I didn't sob and rack dramatically, just did the manly weeping thing and after awhile I got 'hard' and stayed that way for a very long time.

    It's been a lot of years but I think I'm better and I hope this helps.

    Spotter
    USMC 84-02
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