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DNA testing

MobuckMobuck Member Posts: 12,664 ✭✭✭✭
edited July 2018 in Politics
I heard a report last night that ICE is using DNA testing to re-unite the illegal family units. WHAT??? Don't the kids know their parents or vice versa? Wouldn't a simple picture during the early stages of the fluster cluck have sufficed?
Talk about a foot dragging, money wasting process. Heck, I've seen Mother/kid pairs re-establish after weeks of separation---AND THIS WAS GOATS. Are the illegals that jumped the river dumber than goats? Just open the gate and they'll "pair up" quicker than you can say "shut the gate". If there's any problem with two mothers claiming the same kid--just offer to split the kid and give each mother 1/2.

Comments

  • NeoBlackdogNeoBlackdog Member Posts: 14,356 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Quite often the person claiming to be the parent, isn't.
  • bpostbpost Member Posts: 31,944 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Sex traffickers use the parent ruse to great effect. The threats of death for the real parents makes for some fine acting on the kids part.

    While they are at it why not clear up the huge backlog of DNA tests in our prisons where possibly innocent men are incarcerated and expedite the crime lab DNA testing to find the guilty.
  • US Military GuyUS Military Guy Member Posts: 3,573 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    DNA comes in really handy - when you are trying to solve crimes - at a later date. [;)]
  • serfserf Member Posts: 8,859 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I predicted that illegal immigrants would be the first people in The USA to have mandatory DNA Tests and remember this when they come for you and your family and require DNA tests to receive any government benefits soon.

    It's always criminals and other undesirables that get to go through new government controls first so the sheeple can get used to it!

    serf
  • serfserf Member Posts: 8,859 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Barzillia
    quote:Originally posted by serf

    I predicted that illegal immigrants would be the first people in The USA to have mandatory DNA Tests and remember this when they come for you and your family and require DNA tests to receive any government benefits soon.

    It's always criminals and other undesirables that get to go through new government controls first so the sheeple can get used to it!

    serf



    And you were wrong.


    Yeah and I am sure you know because you can't tell me why. The NWO order can only work if everyone is classified and monitored by the all seeing eye. Bet on it! Resistance is futile, You will be assimilated!

    serf
  • serfserf Member Posts: 8,859 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Barzillia
    Of course I can tell you why you are wrong.

    States as well as the feds have been collecting dna for years from people other than immigrants.

    Before you try telling me I can't give a reason why, perhaps your should do a minimum of fact checking.


    All I know of is if you get arrested by The Fed's In Texas only. But I can believe our Glorious Government is ready to violate your/our rights any way they can to instill their order and rule of Law.

    serf


    https://codes.findlaw.com/tx/government-code/gov-t-sect-411-146.html

    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/your-dna-police-database-flna6C10617124

    he international police agency Interpol listed 54 nations with national police DNA databases in 2009, including Australia, Canada, France, Germany and China. Brazil and India have since announced plans to join the club, and the United Arab Emirates intends to build the world's first database of an entire national population.

    The biggest database is in the United States ? the FBI's Combined DNA Index System, or CODIS, which holds information on more than 11 million people suspected of or convicted of crimes.

    It is set to grow following a May Supreme Court ruling that upheld the right of police forces to take DNA swabs without a warrant from people who are arrested, not just those who are convicted. (Policies on DNA collection vary by state; more than half of the states and the federal government currently take DNA swabs after arrests.)

    The court's justices were divided about implications for individuals' rights. Justice Anthony Kennedy, for the five-judge majority, called the taking of DNA a legitimate and reasonable police booking procedure akin to fingerprinting.

    But dissenting Justice Antonin Scalia argued that it marked a major change in police powers. "Because of today's decision, your DNA can be taken and entered into a national database if you are ever arrested, rightly or wrongly, and for whatever reason," he said.

    A similar note of caution has been struck by Alec Jeffreys, the British geneticist whose 1984 discovery of DNA fingerprinting revolutionized criminal investigations. He has warned that "mission creep" could see authorities use DNA to accumulate information on people's racial origins, medical history and psychological profile.

    Erlich agreed that scenario was possible, if not likely.

    "If it's not regulated and the police can do whatever they want. ... They can use your DNA to infer things about your health, your ancestry, whether your kids are your kids," he said.

    Police forces have already tracked down criminals through the DNA of their innocent relatives, a practice that is both a goldmine for investigators and, according to skeptics, an ethical minefield. Charles Tumosa, a clinical assistant professor in forensic studies at the University of Baltimore who is wary of the potential for genetic surveillance, says relatives of suspects could be identified through DNA and leaned on for information about their family members.

    "There's got to be a debate," said Tumosa. "Nobody has talked this out.

    "At what point do you say, enough is enough? Do we want to have a society where 5 percent of the crime is unsolved, or do we want to have a society where 100 percent of the crime is solved" but privacy is compromised. "What's the trade-off?"

    And yet familial DNA searches have helped solve terrible crimes. In Kansas in 2005, police identified Dennis Rader as a serial killer known as "BTK" through his daughter's DNA obtained, without her knowledge, from a pap smear in her medical records.
    Recommended
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    Investigators in Massachusetts say advances in DNA technology may finally establish beyond doubt the perpetrator of the 1960s Boston Strangler slayings. They plan to exhume the body of longtime suspect Albert DeSalvo ? who confessed to the crimes but was never convicted ? after DNA from one of the crime scenes produced a familial match with him.

    Both supporters and critics of DNA databases point to Britain, where until recently, police could take the DNA of anyone 10 or older arrested for even the most minor offense ? and keep it forever, even if the suspect was later acquitted or released without charge.

    Police say the database has helped solve thousands of crimes, including murders and rapes. On the other side of the coin are hundreds of thousands of innocent people, including children, who feel shamed and tainted by inclusion on a database of criminal suspects ? a status some legal experts say undermines the presumption of innocence.

    "A lot of British people were very shocked to find themselves or their children ending up on the database for minor alleged offenses such as throwing a snowball at a car," said Helen Wallace, director of the privacy group GeneWatch, which campaigns for restrictions on collection of DNA and other personal information.

    After a long legal battle ? waged in part by a youth who was arrested at 11 on suspicion of attempted robbery and had his DNA retained despite being acquitted ? the European Court of Human Rights ruled in 2008 that Britain's "blanket and indiscriminate" storage of DNA violated the right to a private life.

    The U.K. was forced to trim its huge database. Under a law passed last year known as the Protection of Freedoms Act, the government is destroying the DNA profiles ? strings of numbers derived from DNA samples that are used to identify individuals ? of a million people who were arrested for minor offenses but not convicted. People acquitted of serious crimes have their DNA profiles kept for up to five years.

    Britain also has incinerated more than 6 million physical DNA samples ? mostly swabs of saliva ? taken from suspects. Samples, which could previously be kept indefinitely, must now be destroyed after six months.

    Destroying the samples is seen as key to limiting DNA databases to crime-fighting rather than snooping, because it means stored DNA cannot be used to trace relatives or susceptibility to disease.

    The U.K. government says the curbs have restored a sense of proportion to Britain's database, but some aspects of the country's genetic monitoring remain murky.

    The U.K. DNA ethics watchdog has expressed concerns about a secret counterterrorism database, which, according to the Metropolitan Police Authority, contains "DNA obtained through searches, crime scenes and arrests in relation to counterterrorism" ? including samples from people stopped and questioned at ports and borders, even if they are not arrested.

    The Home Office, which oversees police and the DNA database, said there was a "robust regulatory framework" for the counterterrorism database. But it would not disclose how large it is, who has access to it or whether the information is shared with other countries.

    Related stories

    Scientists demonstrate how hackers could unlock your genetic secrets

    Who's keeping your genetic keys?

    Some authorities on DNA say fears of genetic intrusion are misplaced.

    Chris Asplen, a former assistant U.S. attorney who now heads the Global Alliance for Rapid DNA Testing, argues that DNA is not dramatically different from other information the authorities already hold about millions of people, such as fingerprints, Social Security numbers or automobile registrations.

    But he does see avenues for abuse.

    "There is an argument to be made that because that biological sample exists, the government could go back and do other things with it that are not authorized by the law," he said. "It's a constant tension between government and people, particularly when technology is applied."
  • serfserf Member Posts: 8,859 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by us55840
    Found this:


    CODIS
    CODIS (Combined DNA Index System) is an electronic database of DNA profiles that is maintained by the FBI. To date, there are more than 56,200 individuals DNA that have been entered into the South Dakota DNA database. This DNA database is an investigative tool for South Dakota law enforcement. To date, over 600 criminal investigations have been aided by database hits. There are ~ 15,000,000 samples at NDIS. Nationally, over 275,000 investigations have been aided by CODIS.

    This DNA database is comprised of the following categories of DNA records:

    Offenders - DNA profiles of persons convicted and/or arrested of crimes
    Forensic - DNA profiles from samples recovered from crime scenes
    Unidentified Human (Remains) - DNA profiles from samples recovered from unidentified human remains
    Missing person
    Relatives of Missing Persons - DNA profiles from samples voluntarily contributed from relatives of missing persons
    Every state in the nation participates in the National DNA Index System (NDIS). Each state's collection law differs as to arrestees/convicted and the qualifying offenses. Offender DNA profiles are entered into the DNA database. Upon entry into CODIS a DNA profile may be compared to DNA profiles obtained from Crime Laboratories across the country for potential matches. This exchange of information allows a DNA profile from one crime scene to be linked to a separate crime scene or an offender in a different jurisdiction. Therefore, law enforcement officers have the ability to identify suspects when no prior suspect exists.

    When a DNA match is found in CODIS and it provides information that the case officer previously did not know, it is called a hit. When a CODIS hit occurs, a CODIS match report may be issued to the agency or agencies involved. Two types of CODIS match reports are the Forensic hit report and the Offender hit report. A forensic hit report is issued when a DNA profile from a crime scene matches a DNA profile obtained from a separate crime scene. This report will contain the information regarding the agency and potentially the investigator who was in charge of the case. An Offender hit report is issued when a DNA profile from a crime scene matches a DNA profile obtained from a convicted offender. The offender hit report will contain the offenders name and information such as date of birth, social security number and any alias information.

    Currently the SDFL outsources all DNA offender testing for the database. It is one goal of the SDFL that this testing will be performed solely in house. The new Copan CPA200 puncher will assist in this process.

    The forensic lab provides the Department of Corrections, regional jails, and law enforcement with directions and material used in collecting biological samples, cheek (buccal) swabs, from felony adult arrestees and adjudicated juveniles who have committed qualifying offenses that will be tested for DNA and incorporated in the Offender DNA Index.

    https://atg.sd.gov/LawEnforcement/Forensics/codis.aspx






    Just hope you don't have a relative who is criminal, illegal or sign up voluntarily for DNA testing, You see someone in an evil lab could make a designer weapon just to kill you or common relatives all the way up to killing a certain trace race of humans.

    As the future gets more sophisticated and complicated then new tools are created to kill as well as save human lives.

    serf

    Could President Trump be the first on the list?

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2012/11/hacking-the-presidents-dna/309147/?single_page=true

    The U.S. government is surreptitiously collecting the DNA of world leaders, and is reportedly protecting that of Barack Obama. Decoded, these genetic blueprints could provide compromising information. In the not-too-distant future, they may provide something more as well?the basis for the creation of personalized bioweapons that could take down a president and leave no trace.


    The range of threats that the Secret Service has to guard against already extends far beyond firearms and explosive devices. Both chemical and radiological attacks have been launched against government officials in recent years. In 2004, the poisoning of the Ukrainian presidential candidate Viktor Yushchenko involved TCCD, an extremely toxic dioxin compound. Yushchenko survived, but was severely scarred by chemically induced lesions. In 2006, Alexander Litvinenko, a former officer of the Russian security service, was poisoned to death with the radioisotope polonium 210. And the use of bioweapons themselves is hardly unknown; the 2001 anthrax attacks in the United States nearly reached members of the Senate.
  • serfserf Member Posts: 8,859 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Barzillia
    quote:Originally posted by serf
    quote:Originally posted by Barzillia
    Of course I can tell you why you are wrong.

    States as well as the feds have been collecting dna for years from people other than immigrants.

    Before you try telling me I can't give a reason why, perhaps your should do a minimum of fact checking.


    All I know of is if you get arrested by The Fed's In Texas only. But I can believe our Glorious Government is ready to violate your/our rights any way they can to instill their order and rule of Law.

    serf


    https://codes.findlaw.com/tx/government-code/gov-t-sect-411-146.html

    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/your-dna-police-database-flna6C10617124

    he international police agency Interpol listed 54 nations with national police DNA databases in 2009, including Australia, Canada, France, Germany and China. Brazil and India have since announced plans to join the club, and the United Arab Emirates intends to build the world's first database of an entire national population.

    The biggest database is in the United States ? the FBI's Combined DNA Index System, or CODIS, which holds information on more than 11 million people suspected of or convicted of crimes.

    It is set to grow following a May Supreme Court ruling that upheld the right of police forces to take DNA swabs without a warrant from people who are arrested, not just those who are convicted. (Policies on DNA collection vary by state; more than half of the states and the federal government currently take DNA swabs after arrests.)

    The court's justices were divided about implications for individuals' rights. Justice Anthony Kennedy, for the five-judge majority, called the taking of DNA a legitimate and reasonable police booking procedure akin to fingerprinting.

    But dissenting Justice Antonin Scalia argued that it marked a major change in police powers. "Because of today's decision, your DNA can be taken and entered into a national database if you are ever arrested, rightly or wrongly, and for whatever reason," he said.

    A similar note of caution has been struck by Alec Jeffreys, the British geneticist whose 1984 discovery of DNA fingerprinting revolutionized criminal investigations. He has warned that "mission creep" could see authorities use DNA to accumulate information on people's racial origins, medical history and psychological profile.

    Erlich agreed that scenario was possible, if not likely.

    "If it's not regulated and the police can do whatever they want. ... They can use your DNA to infer things about your health, your ancestry, whether your kids are your kids," he said.

    Police forces have already tracked down criminals through the DNA of their innocent relatives, a practice that is both a goldmine for investigators and, according to skeptics, an ethical minefield. Charles Tumosa, a clinical assistant professor in forensic studies at the University of Baltimore who is wary of the potential for genetic surveillance, says relatives of suspects could be identified through DNA and leaned on for information about their family members.

    "There's got to be a debate," said Tumosa. "Nobody has talked this out.

    "At what point do you say, enough is enough? Do we want to have a society where 5 percent of the crime is unsolved, or do we want to have a society where 100 percent of the crime is solved" but privacy is compromised. "What's the trade-off?"

    And yet familial DNA searches have helped solve terrible crimes. In Kansas in 2005, police identified Dennis Rader as a serial killer known as "BTK" through his daughter's DNA obtained, without her knowledge, from a pap smear in her medical records.
    Recommended
    Thai diver dies amid cave rescue of trapped soccer team
    Outrage after white man calls police on black woman at North Carolina pool

    Investigators in Massachusetts say advances in DNA technology may finally establish beyond doubt the perpetrator of the 1960s Boston Strangler slayings. They plan to exhume the body of longtime suspect Albert DeSalvo ? who confessed to the crimes but was never convicted ? after DNA from one of the crime scenes produced a familial match with him.

    Both supporters and critics of DNA databases point to Britain, where until recently, police could take the DNA of anyone 10 or older arrested for even the most minor offense ? and keep it forever, even if the suspect was later acquitted or released without charge.

    Police say the database has helped solve thousands of crimes, including murders and rapes. On the other side of the coin are hundreds of thousands of innocent people, including children, who feel shamed and tainted by inclusion on a database of criminal suspects ? a status some legal experts say undermines the presumption of innocence.

    "A lot of British people were very shocked to find themselves or their children ending up on the database for minor alleged offenses such as throwing a snowball at a car," said Helen Wallace, director of the privacy group GeneWatch, which campaigns for restrictions on collection of DNA and other personal information.

    After a long legal battle ? waged in part by a youth who was arrested at 11 on suspicion of attempted robbery and had his DNA retained despite being acquitted ? the European Court of Human Rights ruled in 2008 that Britain's "blanket and indiscriminate" storage of DNA violated the right to a private life.

    The U.K. was forced to trim its huge database. Under a law passed last year known as the Protection of Freedoms Act, the government is destroying the DNA profiles ? strings of numbers derived from DNA samples that are used to identify individuals ? of a million people who were arrested for minor offenses but not convicted. People acquitted of serious crimes have their DNA profiles kept for up to five years.

    Britain also has incinerated more than 6 million physical DNA samples ? mostly swabs of saliva ? taken from suspects. Samples, which could previously be kept indefinitely, must now be destroyed after six months.

    Destroying the samples is seen as key to limiting DNA databases to crime-fighting rather than snooping, because it means stored DNA cannot be used to trace relatives or susceptibility to disease.

    The U.K. government says the curbs have restored a sense of proportion to Britain's database, but some aspects of the country's genetic monitoring remain murky.

    The U.K. DNA ethics watchdog has expressed concerns about a secret counterterrorism database, which, according to the Metropolitan Police Authority, contains "DNA obtained through searches, crime scenes and arrests in relation to counterterrorism" ? including samples from people stopped and questioned at ports and borders, even if they are not arrested.

    The Home Office, which oversees police and the DNA database, said there was a "robust regulatory framework" for the counterterrorism database. But it would not disclose how large it is, who has access to it or whether the information is shared with other countries.

    Related stories

    Scientists demonstrate how hackers could unlock your genetic secrets

    Who's keeping your genetic keys?

    Some authorities on DNA say fears of genetic intrusion are misplaced.

    Chris Asplen, a former assistant U.S. attorney who now heads the Global Alliance for Rapid DNA Testing, argues that DNA is not dramatically different from other information the authorities already hold about millions of people, such as fingerprints, Social Security numbers or automobile registrations.

    But he does see avenues for abuse.

    "There is an argument to be made that because that biological sample exists, the government could go back and do other things with it that are not authorized by the law," he said. "It's a constant tension between government and people, particularly when technology is applied."




    serf, like all too many in these forums, you are all too ready to seize onto and believe anything that reinforces your delusions.


    All governments are deluded with powers over people lives. The USA is no exception. You would have to be living in a vacuum not see how it progresses & infringes on people's rights and with the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

    All these illegals have been poring into our cities from Central America now for over forty years violating Federal law as The Government did nothing to stop it and now we have dumb down the nation into poverty and with massive debt.

    It's a joke to see how our leaders have sold out our country to illegal foreigners and greedy central banks so they can vote Us into The NWO and slavery.

    serf
  • serfserf Member Posts: 8,859 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Barzillia
    All governments are deluded, serf, on that we can agree.

    Neither one of us can do a single about that, nor about the one who is to come.

    But the subject was your delusions.


    Yeah giving your DNA profile to the government is not delusion and I know you are all for it so have a nice day In your Utopia fantasy.

    serf
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