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357 MAGNUM LOAD

RosieRosie Member Posts: 14,525 ✭✭✭
How does 4.5 grains of red dot behind a lead swc sound? Or what is a good load using red dot?

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    bpostbpost Member Posts: 32,664 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Up that charge by 1/2 a grain unless you want wimp loads.
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    RosieRosie Member Posts: 14,525 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    OK 5 grains for 357. How about 38 special? 3.5 grains of red dot? Same bullet.
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    bpostbpost Member Posts: 32,664 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    3.5 to 3.8 grains would be a nice mid-range fun plinking load with 158 grain bullets. You could shoot a whole coffee can full of them and not spend 20 bucks on ammo!
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    RosieRosie Member Posts: 14,525 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks a million bpost. I have about 11 pounds of red dot left over from my trap shooting days and a couple of thousand bullets from when I reloaded pistol calibers. I want to use some of it up without buying powder. Be a good chance to teach grand sons about reloading!
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    Rocky RaabRocky Raab Member Posts: 14,230 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    RedDot is a very good choice for handgun loads, being "fluffy" as well as easy to ignite, insensitive to position within the case, and fairly clean-burning at the moderate pressures involved. Except for maximum loads, you can confidently use RedDot at the same charge weights as Bullseye, Clays and several other very fast powders, also.

    One good but unsuspected use is in rifle loads. As Ed Harris wrote some years ago, 13 grains makes an excellent practice load in a wide variety of rifle loadings. See http://members.shaw.ca/cronhelm/TheLoad.html for exact details and cautions.
    I may be a bit crazy - but I didn't drive myself.
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